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April 29, 1922 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.1 A £L.. AVLL%'A a&~.ar'LI~ &.fdiL

ALL-CAMPUS TENNIS NOTICE

I

11

m

rook

TEAM

ichigan opens its tennis schedule
afternoon with a practice match
h the Pontiac Tennis club on the
tiac courts. -Four men have been
cted to represent the Varsity in
opener. They are Capt. Charles
kel, George Reindel, Jr., Johann
ich, and Federicogancilez. This
rtet has shown to best advantage
ng the past week and Coach Wes,
)k has named them as his choice
the first match of the year. .
Pontiac Is Regular Opener
Or the past three years Pontiac
been first on the Varsity list of
.es. The club has two of the fin-
concrete courts in the country and
this reason play is made possi-
as soon as the snow leaves the
md. Paul Leidy, who captained
Michigan net team in 1909, heads
list of players who will repre-,
Pontiac. He has had wide tour-
.ent experience- since leaving
>ol and has found time from his
ness to keep in' trim. He has al-
s been a strong man in tourna-
ts around .this part of the coun-
Robert Currie is another mem-
of the Pontiac team who plays)
'editable game. Paired with Lei-.
the two make a strong doubles
bination. Little is known of the
r two members of the Pontiac
1. In a match with M. A. C. a
k ago. Pontiac won six of the nine'
Ches. The match today will con-
of but four singles and two dou-

Results of all matches in the
first round of the All-campus
singles tennis tournament must
Ibe in by MVonday noon or the.
matches will be considered for
feited.
A luni lasebazll
,Stars Lxpect To
Tr ample Varsity
Norman Hill, '11, member of the
track team of 1909 and at present
managing editor of the Sault Ste. Ma-
rie Evening Sun, has charge of gath-
ering the Alumni bseball team which
will give battle to the Varsity in the
two "special attraction" "games of
Commencement week. The games,
which will be held on June' 16 and
17, will be played before record
breaking crowds so the Alumni team'
will be bound to put forth its best ef-
forts to prove- that "has beens" can
come back..
Letters have been sent to all for-
mer winners of the "M" in baseball,'
urging them to be on the field ready
to take up the cause. Special efforts
will. be made to secure such m'en as
George Sisler and Johnny Lavan, but
all former players and would-be play-
ers are invited to forget their busi-
n'esses for a couple of days and come
back to help win from the Varsity
as they confidently boast they will do.
FALLON HANDLES TRACKl
IN FARRELL'S ABSENCE

MORE_

INNESOT LINE COAC
SAYS SPRING MATERfIA
IS WILLING ANO TOUGHi

THAN 100 ENTHUSIASTS
REPORT TO GOPHER
COACHES

Minneapolis, Minn., April 28. -
"Green, but willing and awfully
tough," is the manner in which Boles
Rosenthal, newly appointed line coach.
at the University of Minnesota, de-
scribed the candidates for the 1922
football team wblo have been working
out at spring practice.
Rosenthal last season was assist-
ant to Andy Smith at the University
of California and perfected a line' de-
fense which heldo back all attacks sent
against the Bears.
Giving Men the Rudiments
Working with Rosenthal is George
Hauser, one of the greatest linemen
ever developed at Minnesota, and the
pair are putting line candidates
through the rudiments of play in the
various forward positions.
More than 100 line candidates have
reported and are said to furnish W.
H. (Bill) Spaulding a weallth of ma-
terial, which should develop into real
football stuff. Both Rosenthal and
Hauser praise the physical develop-
ment of the men after a little per-
sonal contact, and expect to be able
to work off a large amount ofd the
greenness before the close o f the
spring season.
Stars in Othier Sports
Coach Spaulding is loking over the
backfield material. Several of the
men who were on last season's squad
are busr in other 'branches of ath-
letics. Martineau, the best ground
gainer of last season's winless team,
is out for track. Gilstead and Brown,
also backfield men, are out for base-
ball. However, Coach Spaulding be-
lieves that these men will be ready for
the fall work,. without the spring
training.
Considerable time is being given to
the development of kickers and some
promising material has been uncov-
ered.
Orders for engraving placed now
will insure prompt delivery. 0. .
Morrill, 17 Nickel's Arcade.-Adv.

Johnny Mohardt, of Notre Dame
football fame, who has been with the
Detroit Tigers so far this season, will
play in the outfield for the Denver
baseball club for the remainder of the
season.
George Askar, nine year old cue ex-
pert of Port Huron, recently made a
run of 43 in pocket billiards. This
youngster has been playing the game
but seven months.
Jack Dempsey Thursday received
an attractive offer from a group of
prominent English sporting promoters.
to meet George Carpentier, the French
champion, in London sometime during
the summer, provided Carpentier de-
feats Ted "Kid" Lewis on May 11.
Neither Dempsey nor Manager Kearns
. would disclose the terms of the affair,
but Kearns said that it involved an
immense purse and that Dempsey
would probably accept.
In addition to its efforts to capture
the Davis cup next summer, the Aus-
trialasian lawn tennis team intends to
make a serious effort to win the lead-
ing tournament honors of the game in
both England and in this country.

fits Of Sports

Evidence of the earnestness of the
desire of the Detroit alumnae for a
Women'2 building is shown in the
fact that the proceeds of the.Univer-
sity Girls' Glee club concert to be
given this evening under the auspices
of the. Detroit Association of Univer-
sity Women, at Northern high school,
Detroit, will be contributed to the
building fund.-
STheGlee club will be directedby
Miss Nora Crane Hunt, of the faculty
of the School of Music, and will be
accompanied by Florence Shirey, '22.
The Doll dance, fro'm "Septres and
Serenades," the 1922 Junior Girls'
play, will be given..
Offer features are 'cello solos by
Avon Rich, '23, solos by Esther Hol-
lands, School of 17usic, and the Glee
club quartet. Arrangements for the!
concert are being made by Marguerite
Chapin, '20. .
Lost something? A Classifled Ad in
The Daily will find it for you.-Adv.
Patronize Daily A£dvert,.er.-Adv.

DETROIT CONCERT
SET FOR TONIGHT

In the issue of The Daily
28, Prof. Charles W. Edmunds
ferred to as a member of the
sity Health service. Profes
munds is a professor in the
school and-is not connected
Health service.
Uniforms for Cheerleadi
Any one having an Idea
uniforms for cheer leader
requested to describe same
letter and send to A. 0.
bert, 1016 E. University
ANN ARBOR CUSTOM 1
FACTORY
We make all kinds of shoes
ure. Sport shoes our specia
Forest Avenue. Satisfaction
teed.-Adv.
Something for ,sale? A
A&d in The Daily will fnd a
Adv

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EVENTS TO BE LISTED
The Michigan Daily desires tp
compile for publication a calen-
dar of all important campus
events between May 1 and the
end of school. TIhe dates and
names of all such events must
be sent to the Calendar Editor,
Michigan Daily, at once.

\)

i _.

d Cut Is Made
ook has announced an-
he squad. The follow-
continue to report for
arles Merkel, -George-
ohann Rorich, Federico
an Zemon, Frederick
ward Kline, and Rich-
This leaves the squad
e it will contniue for
Eventually it will' be
x, where it will stand

While delegations of Michigan's
Varsity track men are representing
the school in both Eastern and West-
ern track meets this week end, the re-
mainder of the squad, numbering
about 10 or 12 men, are working out
at Ferry field under the .guidance of-
Billie Fallen, trainer.
The workouts are light and are be-.
ing held only in an effort to keep the
men in ,as good condition as possible
for next Saturday when Ohio State
univ'ersity sends her track .team here
for a dual meet with Farrell's men.
Yesterday afternoon the men merely.
Jogged around the track and did but
little work in their respective events.
Fallon said that he would not put the
men through a very strenuous work-
out this afternoon, but rather would
let them put in a little time limbering
up to keep in condition for the com-
ing meet.
Yesterday's Games
American League
Chicago 9; Detroit 6.
Cleveland 2, St. Louis 3.
Washington 9, Philadelphia 4.
B oston 3, New York 10.

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New Suits!
rHEY'RE here! Reg-
ulatiojn models and also
the newest versions of the
three and four button sacks.
Ira twCeds, worsteds, serges,
homespuns and cassimeres.
Wih tailored-in distincti.-e-
ness. In patterns you won't
Se e commonly hawked
about. At prices that hardly
rspresent their worth I

B.B. PIPES
Standard of the wrld and
always tihe favorite with
Michigan men.
We have been Ann Arbor
distributors for 16
years.
Class Pipes and Pipe
Repairs a specialty.

I

run into
tches will
ith M. A.
comes to
.e Univer-
is sched-

vim~r' ~w~wm

FM

'"98LITS NOTICE
All members of the 192. liter-
ary class who have'not yet paid
their class dues of $2 are urged to
do so at once. Checks are to be
mailed to the class treasurer at
2107. Washtenaw avenue. Names
of senior lits whose dues are yet
unpaid are now posted in the reg-
istrar's office, according to Walt..
er B. Rea, president of the class.

L
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Las# Times Today
-
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^.- i -n~
JrD - ~ I-_ n _., r_

Featurina

by

.3 , 2.

Custom tailored garments
ready - to - wear
HICKEY-FREEMAN
HIRSH-WICKWARE

'U'
15.
al
IRI

[Y} try #n t-~ea.tye~ iU , :

WAGNER

&

COMNY
Since 1848

ma

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IWUE

p:
B RU v s id ii Ill f dt

Far Aieis

National League
New York 10, Boston 6.
St. Louis 11, Chicago 3.
(Cincinnati 5, Pittsburg 3.
Philadelphia 10, Brooklyn 7.

- _ ' . 1
0 ~.,,.

I

TAis
CLOSES
IAT 3 P,M.

ADVERTISING

WANTEF'
rED-Several canoes for one day
i. Will pay $5 for each. Call.
; 870-W. 146-5
TED-Theses neatly typed and
nd. Accuracy guaranteed. Miss
rk, 1443-M. 149-3
TED-Furnsihed house for rent
fraternity of twenty men. Call
rk, 280-W. 149-2
TED-Boys for table waiters for
ummer, at Summer Resort. Call
7-M. 150-2
FOE SALE
SALE-Brass Buescher C. Melody
aphone. Best offer takes it. Call
, 1619-R. - 149-3
MISCELLANEOUS
FULLER BRUSH CO. desire the
vices of a few more college men
Summer Vacation. Applications
uld be made at once. Call Satur-
r at 301 First ' National Bank
lding. 150
[IGAN MElN are now signing con-
cts to sell "Wear-Ever" aluminum
ipment during their summer va-
on. No canvassing. College men
raged $950 profit for last sum-
r's work. Call Townsend, 1122-M
Irwin 2372 and get the facts.
145-6

S MISCELLANEOUS
>- OW ABOUT your summer work?
Last year students at Michigan av-
eraged $1,000 per man selling brush-
es. This spring vacation they aver-
aged $75.00 for their .one week's
work. If this interests you drop in
and see me about territory before.
it is all taken up. Mr. H. J. Leader,
. 232 Nickel's Arcade. Phone 600-M.
149-21
REAL USED CAR VALUES-Liberty
Sport, Cadillac Sedan, Columbia
Touring, Hupmobile Touring, Max-
.well Demonstrator.' Cadillac Gar-
age, 321 So. Main. Phone 1625.
150-21 ,
LOST-Conklin fountain pen between
School of Music and cience build-
ing. Finder please leave at U. Hall,
Secretary's office. 150
LOST- Will the finder return gold
fountain pen with initials, "Z. T. Z."
to 1328 Washtenaw. Reward of $5.
149-2
LOST-Between the Surveying build-
ing and Boulevard, silver watch .
case. Liberal reward. Call 2742.
160-4
LOST-One 30x3 1-2 fabric tire on rim.
Finder please call 1104. 149-2
FOR RENT .
FOR RENT-Room for rest of school
- and summer school, if desired.
Phone 1348-J. 150

Mario Chamlee

Cyrena Van Gordon

'In

FOUR DA YS-MAY 17, 18, 19 20-SIX CONCERTS
f
Singers -Pianists
Orchestra = Choruses.
MICHIGAN'S GREATEST MUSICAL EVENT
limited number of course tickets still available at $4.50 and $5.00.
UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC
CHARLES A. SINK,
Secretary

Rolli -Pease

.3JurL .c .AJ4LVAR

- Gold and
Phone 919.
e Co., 205 E.'

silver
White
Wash-
149-3

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