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April 29, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

iTCH CHANE I
ERATUIRE TODAY

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No. 150

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 1922

...

LA

WS

GIVEN

CLUB,

D RMIi

SPLENDOR OFWA
IS DOMANT AT
GUNS, FLARES, "N. P." UNIFORMS
GIVE MARTIAL NOTE TO
DANCE
DECORATIONS RIVALED
ONLY BY JUNiOR HOPS
Prominent Army. Officers and Univer-
sity Officials Are Present at
Reception
Veterans appearing in uniform aft-
er a three year period in civilian life,
decorations in 'colors reminiscent of
America's great military effort, and
dance music by thee orchestras in the
open spaces of Waterman and Barboir
gymnasiums were the chief marks of
the second annual Military ball last
night that;promised to zlhake it a per-
manent affair for Michigan's veterans.
Military promptness in I the night's
arrangements and the decorations
have only been rivaled at University
dances by the splendid effects seen at
the J-Hop in past years.
Field Guns Guard Entrance
Guests were met on their approach
to the gymnasiums by red flares, field
-guns near by, and service men as their
attendatits, guarding the entrances to
the gymnasiums. "M. P.'s" in full
uniform stood at the door to receive
guests, and were stationed around the
dance floor, lending color to the ar-
ray. Nearly half of the men again
wore uniforms used in the World war,
sailor blue and khaki brown appear--
ing at every turn,
The reception, headed by prominent
members of the faculty and guests
from the military corps area of the
Middle West, strted promptly at 8:30
o'cloc . The grand march, led by the
first squad consisting of Warren V.
Gilbert, '22E, of Detroit, and Miss Car-
oline McGraw, also of Detroit, Newell
( Chamberlain, '22E, of Lakewood, O.,
and Miss Doris Williams, of Swarth-
more, Pa,, George M. Lott, '22, of Den-
ver, and Miss ielen Weher, of Chica-
go, and Gordon Gale, '23L, and Mrs.
Ggle, sdarted at 9 'clock .and the
ignal picture of all . the assembled
dancers' was taken frpm the balcony
pf Waterman gymnasium at 9:30
o'clock, Dancing was started immed-
iately and continued until 2 o'clock.
Natonal Colors Dominant .
Decorations were done in a predom-
inating color scheme of red, white,
and blue, with American flags and
r'egaMental linsignia hanging every-
where fronm the upper beams. Guns
aur rifieS placed at prominent points
a#e battleship turrets with rays of
light emanating added a stronger
touch of martial effect. Olive drab
programs, with -the insignia of the
Veterans of Foreign Wars and red,
white, and bile ribbons, were also
provided as svenis o the dance.
Music was alternately provided by
the two orchestras placed in Water-
man gymnasium, Kennedy's and
Wright's dance orchestra, and War-
ing's Pennsylvanians playe'd in the
smaller room. Refreshments were
servetj from 11 to 1 o#cloc.

A"lm"aArrne
Solitary 'Reunions
For Radio Night
Wilfred .B. Shaw, secretary of the
Alumni association, has received word
of what will probably be the strang-
est reunion of the many groups of
Michigan graduates who will listen to
the "Michigan Night", radio program
tonight.
Catherine Baillio, Alexandria, La.,
-the only graduate of the University in
her city, has announced her intention
of procuring the services of the radio
outfit in that city and taking part in
the nation-wide gathering all by her-
self.
'
Mary Ives, '23, Takes Lead in Chinese
Play in 1il Audi-
.toriumin

ANNUAL - "MASQUES" PRODUC-
TION PRESENTS STRONG CAST
An unusually strong and varied cast
will be found in Masques' presentation
of "Yellow Jacket" at 8 o'clock to-
night in Hill auditorium, there being
nine leads and more than 30 people
in ithe production.
The leading part, that of the young
prince destined for the imperial Yel-
low Jacket, is played by 'Mary Ives,
'23, who last year was Toady Gwendp-d
len in "The Importance of Being in
Earnest," and Miss Ives, according to
Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, director of
the play, mares one of the best
"leading men" in Masques' history.
Salisbury Takes Heroine's ert
Shirley Salisbury, '34, plays the
heroine, and Joyce MaCurdy, '22, the
Cecily Cardew of "The Importance of
Being in Earnest," plays the part of
Chee Moo.
Isabella Kemp, '22, has a fantastic
and grotesque part in Yin Suey Gong,
the heat merchant. Portia Goulder,
'23, the red-bearded professor cf the
last Junior Glirls' .piay, has the role.
of Wu Sin Yin the Great. Lee Sin, whp
is onfe of th'e commanding figures in
the play, is Anne Mushkin, '23, the
Magis of "Scepter ant Serenade."
Chow Wan the. siren. is velyr} oclt-
well, '22, the Selina of last year's
"Selina". Sue, Virginig frodell, '24,
takes the part of the Thunder go4,
and the role of Ling Wong is taken
by Carribei Schmidt, '2.
To Giye Uhilese Dagpe '
A feature of -the play is a Chinese
dance by Hortense Hoad, ,24, and
Mildred Henry, '22, Two strong parts
which are very unusual ill that they
have no real aotign are those f the
Chorus who cpmnets and egplains
the play as it 'moves algng, .ar the
Property INan. The 'itter h
unique part inasmr1pch as hek ias u9
a single line bu$ is. o} the stage
throughout the entjr play, supposed-
ly, to the eyes of the audience, tq be
"intensely invisible'" and really the
center of constant initerest ant comicI
relief at all times.' This unusual r e
is played by B{lsie Townsep4, ' 22

~OLYEINESDOWN
MAR OONS,3-1, IN
TEAM SCORES IN MAJORfITY OF
INNINGS; CHICAGO SECURES
LONE TALLY IN 'FIFTH
WORK OF LIVERANCE ON
MOUND IS BIG FACTOR
Strikes Out 10 Men and Gives Chicago
Men Only One Baso on
Balls
(Special from 'the Daily Maroon)
Chicago, April 28. - Michigan
thoroughly outclassed the Maroons in
the contest at Stagg ield this after-
noon, easily winning 9 to 1. Weak in
all departments, the Maroon offensive1
and defensive provea no match for1
the Wolverines, who were never press-
ed during the entire contest,
Knode's homer, two base hit and
three bagger were the feature of the
game. A home riu clout by Shac-
kleford in the first frame was disal-
lowed when the umpire decided that
he had not touched second base. Liv-
erance was found for but two weak
hits, and Michigan gained 13 off Chi-
Liverance's performance on thet
muoun4 wgas one of the ost thenome
nal in hiscareer de atr}ck out 10
men and held the Staggmen httas
until the latter part of the contest,
(Continued on Page light)
I ,
ASSISTANT CA1kP SUPERVISORS
NEEI EI ; EXPEVTE1D TO CARE
SOR #00 BOYS_
With funds cotinuing to stream in
from members of the faculty and
townspeople, the total for the second
t'niversity of Michigan Fresh Air
camp last night reahed Y$1,600. It
will be seieral more days before the
work of solicitIng is completed.
Seven niPn signed up yesterday to
hel'b supervise at the amp. More
students ar' needd to stay either part
of the time or ll of the time during
the tife of the camp. All interested
should report at Lane hall
With substantial subseritions com-
ing ii from alumni for the mainten-
ance ot the camp, it looled yesterday
as thugh 300 boyS can be taken care
of this year. The number last year
was 1W -
Des Moines, Iowa, April 28.-Sinions,
and Burle qualiied in the 1.00 y ar
dash, 5argeat in the high hurdle and
Mcilveu in the high jump here today.

Secret Service
Agent To Sp eak
On Red Russia
Sir Paul Dukes, who has been se-
lected by the Oratorical association* to
give the final number in the lecture
course series, will deliver his lecture
on" Secret Service in Red Russia," at
8 o'clock Tuesday night, May 2, in
Hill auditorium. He will take the
place of Irvin Cobb, who cancelled his
engagement because of illness.
Sir Paul, the younger sn of a dis-
tinguished English family, spent his
early years in Russia, and later was
a student in a Russian conservatory of
music.
When the war began in 1914 he ob-
tained an appointment in the Anglo-
Russian commission and later, after
the murder of Captain Crombie, Brit-
ish intelligence officer, he assumed
charge of the intelligence service. It
is on this adventure that his lecture
is based.,
SCAT1TERED ALUMN
AWA I iNGPOGRAM
' tcBhiigean Night" Radio Numbers to
BeT Receved by Graduates
Throughout Country v
CONCERT WILL BE RECEIVED
AT TWO PLACES IN ANN ARBOR
Students of the University will be
given the opportunity of hearing the
"Michigan Night" program, wlieh
will be broadcasted from the Detroit
News radio station at 8 o'clock to-
night, in the second floor reading
room of the Union. A complete re-
ceiving set has been installed by Wal-
ter R. Kreinheder, '23, and 'C. H. Kat
zenberger, '25, of the K. & K. Radio
Suply company. The room has been
provided with a large amplifier and
preliminary tests yesterday we're suc-
cessful. \,
Arrangements have also been made
by the management of the Majestic
theater for "listening in"' at times
to the program during the regular
performance tis evening. Amateurs
should tune their instruments to a
wave length of 360 .meters as this
length will be used by the broad'cast-
ing stations,(WW'J).
The event is the first of its kind in
the history of the University, and
thousands of alumni scattered in every
section of the country'will'"listen in"
on the. program. Many letters have
ben received from both individual
alumni and alumni associations stat-
ing how enthusiastically the event is
being anticipated by them.
The program as announced will be
representative of the finest Michigan
spirit, ,including talks by President
Marion L. B urton, Coach Fielding H.
Yost, prominent athletes and aluinni.t
selections by . the Glee ,and Mandolin
clubs and the Varsity hand and Mich-
igan yells. 4t least two hours wil
be reqwired for the entire event, at
the completion of which the partiot-J
pants will be the gnestta of honor o
the Detroit Alumni association at lo'
tel Sxat -

Proceeds'of Davis Gift to Be Used by
Students in Geodesy and
.Surneying'
A resolution expressing regret at
the resignation of ]ean William H.
Butts, assistant dean of the College
of Engineering and Architecture, was
passed yesterday afternoon at" the
meeting of the Board of Regents. The
resolution follows:
"Whereas, Prof. William H. Butts,,
assistant dean of the College of En-
-gineering and Architecture, after 24
years served on the teaching staff- of
the University and has by his fidelity
to his duties, fairness in his dealings
with students, courytesy to his col-
leagues, and never-failing loyalty to
the University won the respect -and
admiration of all with whom he has
come in contact, and
"Whereas, Professor Butts now,
feels that the time has come for him
to retire from the active and exacting
duties of University life,
V'Therefore, resolved, that in ac-
cepting his resignatipn the Regents
of the University do so with regret
and that they desire to record their
appreciation of a service so well ren-
dered and to wish Professor Butts a
full enjoyment of the rest he has so
well earned."
At this meeting there was estab-
lished by the Davis family a trust fund
to be known as the J. B. and Mary H.
Davis Trust fund, amounting to $10,-
000, the income to be devoted to the
aid of students, of either sex in any
class in the department of geodesy
and surveying in the College of En-
gineering ind Architecture. -The fund
will be administered by a committee
consisting of members of the Board
of Regents, and the dean of the enis-
gineering college and a professor of
surveying. t
Dr. L. M.. Warfield, of Milwaukee,
was appointed t6 be professorpof in-
ternal medicine in the medical school.
Dr. Warfield graduated from Johns
Hopkins university in 1901, taught at
Washington university in St. Louis,.
and was professor of clinical medicine
at Marquette university medical school
until three years ago.

An addition of utmost
anil importance to the
and the' University as a
sisting of a gift of a cor
and dormitory building f
dents, was authorized yest
'ing at the meeting of tl
Regents.
SThe gift is to take the
l building to be known as t
club, located on South
avenue between State stre
pan avenue, which will
headquarters for a club I
ized and made up of grad
Law school and of other 1
may be elected to member
students in the Law sch
Name Withhel
The building will also c
rooms and studies for 1
and. a dining hall to ,a
more than 300. The dono
ls a graduate of the lite
and of the Law school, -b
is not announced. He se
purpose of the gift and th
made of it in the letter wh
Apri
"To the Board of Regen
University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, Mich
"Dear Sirs: - If agree
I will erect on the two
South University avenu
South State street and '
nue, a law students' cor
and dormitory building,
same advantages as yot44.
ed to other buildings, ni
University to furnish free
and power. The $uildin
I knon as 'The Lawyers'
governed' by five governor
of the dean. of the law I

DONOR PROVIDES FOR LEGAl F
IN PROFIT FRO MOPERTINGP

RESOLUTiON .OF REGRET OVER
BUTTS' REIGNATION
ADOPTED
WARFIELD ,APPQINTED
TO MEDICAL FACULTYf

AUTHORITIES S
IN LEGAL El
RESULT
NAME OF BE
ALUMNUS, K
New Structure Wil
150 and il
for

E

FOR NE FIELD HOUSE
CONT1 AUT WILL BR LET WHEN
ARCHITECTS COMPLETE
DETAILS -

:,
;,'
,a
'.
'I

shall be president), and I
governors to be selected by
of Regents from the law fac
State Lawyers Eligli
"All members of the Li
are to be eligible to memw
the proposed club, subject
conditions as the club aufha
prescribe. All lawyers, w
siding in. the state or not, at
previously connected with tl
sity or not, shall be eligibl
bership, subject to being
the governors.
"All occupants of the bui
be members of the club and
such annual dues as the
may determine, and are to 1
by the dean of. the Law sc
the senior law class. Memi
club not living in the gu-il
also pay such annual dues a
ernors may determine. Ga
shall be charged for rooms
"The proposed building w
sleeping and study rooms fc
students and dining accom
for 300.

GIFT FR OM AN ALJMN1J A 1EP'TED BY REGENTS YESTERDAY

WOORAY ESSENTIAL.
TO PUC E S CEST RE
ANGE PLACES HER TRUST IN
AMERICA," HE TELLS
AUDIENCE
)emocracy is the necessary con-
n for a world peace" is the
ement in which Prof. Charles Ces-
of the University of Paris, sum,
up the history of the development
rance in a lecture on "France and
ce," given in Natural Science and-,
ium yesterday afternoon. 'rofes-'
Cestre traced the history of great
'emaexts toward this gqal from the
ipning of the eighteenth 'century

Approval of the geniieral plans fort
the new field house, and steps toward;
its immediate- constructionwere tak-
en by the Board in Control of Ath-
letics at its meeting yesterday at the
Union.
The plans, hlch -have been prepar-
ed by Smith, Hinchman and Grylls,
DetrO t architects, were presented at
tlhe, meeting and 'were found to suit
every' need for which the field houisej
was conceived. , As soon as the arch-
itects have the details workedI out
bids for the construction of the field
house will be received and the Board
will meet within a short time -to let
the contracts
The Board drew a contract with.
Whitehead and Kales, Detroit con-F
tractors, for the structurat- steel work
on the building. The contract states
that the steel work must be completed

,t

's referred to as a
," even did his
noV'ement of pe.ce,
ated. "Not only did
he divine right P
i4eals that were'
French through the
elped in the unlf -
i in other projects
d throughout they

within three mOnths from date, ap-l
proximately Aug. 1.
SWith the letting of this contract
members of the board are able to
predict that the building will be com-
pleted and ready for use by Oct. 1.
The location 'of the new field house
will be 350 feet south of the present
club house, on the east side of Ferry
field. When the building is complet-
ed it will "form part of the eastern
wall.,
Colldege ase ll
',Purdue b, Iowa 1.

Provision for Rese
"All dues and all profit
operation of the building
used. exclusively for lega
work, to be expended fro
time as-the governors may
This legal research work
possible the study of comp
isprudence and legislatio
and state, and also of fo:
tries, ancient and modern.
should be of use in propo
tion, and besides leading
duction of reliable law tr
studies, would help to syst
law as a science.
"The European plan of
ure time to professors to
studies and produce origi
may well be applied ip
professors of law, who at
absorbed too exclusively it
work. A -legal research
be used to pay part of th
thus giving them time#
research.
Responsibility of La
"The character of the I
sion dep~endla~brgely n tY

he

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