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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 25, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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PPLY STORE ULAN ANU AUVB5UH5
iversity Ave. END JOINT SESSION
:hitects' Materials DEANS BURSLEY AND EFFINGER
ns .Loose Leaf Books RETURN FROM MEETING
IN RENTUCKY
d Supplies
'Joseph A. Bursley, dean of students,
agency Tobaccos Dean J. R. Effinger, and Vernon F.
Hillery, '23, returned Saturday from
the University of Kentucky where
they attended the joint session of the
deans and advisors of men in Midwest-
ern colleges and universities. There
were in attendance at the students'
conference approximately 40 dele-
dates representing 27 colleges, and at
cleaned. the conference of deans faculty repre-
)u no more. sentatives from 20 institutions.
All sessions of the deans' confer-
ences were informal, their purpose
being to enable the deans and advis-
i "Unlucky ' ors'of the various schools to come to-
, gether and discuss the various prob-
for Spos" lems confronted in their departments.
At the students meetings all phases
of academic life and of student >adinin-
istration were discussed.The meet-
ing opened with a discussion of college
publications. In this meeting was also
brought up various methods of com-
bating the adverse publicity being.
given the universities throughout the
country by the press. H. H. Ander-
son, managing ;editor of the North-
western Daily, led this discussion. In
subsequent'Ieetings, musical and dra-
matic activities, as well as all other
matters of importance, were discussed.'
The conference was closed by a
joint session of the deans and dele-
gates, in which the student delegates
brought up various methods of co-
operation between students and facul-
ties.
Discussions Lack
1 work by making atdueast
"Lack of initiative on the part of the
.ha student body has caused the group
discussions to be a failure so far," is
a statement made by James G. Frey,
'22, chairman of the Union commit-
tee in charge of that work.
s and satisfying meal, but The plan placed on the Oxford sys-
tem by which a group of 10'or more
harm. It is 100 per students could petition any member of
nd baked, and good to the the faculty and various outside people,
to meet informally to discuss topics
uilding carbohydrates and of common interest originally provid-
i1 in vitamines.' A favorite ed that initiative must come from the
student body. This was thought neces-
leading item on the menu sary to insure the success of the plan
/ for it was to be primarily an expres-
sion of student interest and any at-
the training table of tempt to bolster up the plan by out-
side aid would defeat the end in view.
college in thii counltr~y. The committee appointed by the
Union to get the plan started, secured.
Niagara Falls, N. Y. the cooperation of the leading mem-
bers of the faculty, made provisions
for meeting places whenever desired,
and provided blank petitions to be
signed by the students desiring the dis-
cussions. Up to date only one such,

discussion has been asked for and
held.
In case t here are still any groups
of students who desire such discus-
sions they are urged to get in touch I
with James G. Frey.
String Quartet
To Play Th ur.
The Detroit Symphony String Quar-
tet composed of Ilya Schkolnik, first
violin, William Grafing King, second
violin, Herman. Kolodkin, viola, and
Philip Abbas, 'cello, will give next
Thursday's twilight concern at 4:15
o'clock ini Hill~ auditorium. The
quartet will take thme place of the
regular Thursday afternoon organ re-
.cital.
This concert, like the organ recitals,
will be complimentary to the public.
The organization ranks as one of the
finest string quartets in the country
and has made a remarkable impression
wherever it has appeared. It has been
highly commented upon by leading
critics in Chicago, New York, Boston
and in other cities.
The quartet gave an evening con-
cert on the rMatinee Musicale series
last year, a concert which was judged
one of the most popular of the entire
series. The work of the artists in the
.organization is also known from their
solo work with the Detroit Symphony
orchestra, which hps just completed
the Extra concert series.
ORs SUNO LLAOR
WOULD HAVE SHELL C0MLPETI-
TION BETIWEEN CLASSES
ON BARTOX POND
Although rowing as an aquatic in-
tercollegiate sport at Michigan seems
to be an unlikely project at present,
the installation and use of several
shells in intramural activities seemrn
to be a possibility worth serious con-
sideration, according to Dr. John
Sundwall, director of Students' Phys-
ical Welfare department.
Barton pond, explained Doctor
Sundawll, "is well suited for the sport,
and the objectons to rowing as an in-
tercollegiate affair, including the tre-
mendous expense, would not have to
be met. It is also pointed out that
the strain under which the men com-
peting in intercollegiate rowing are
forced to work, would be eliininated,
and much beneficial exercise would be
obtained by the men , on the intra-
mural teams."
Prof. Cestre to Lecture Here
Prof. Charles Cestre, of the Univer-
sity of Paris, who will deliver several
lectures in Ann Arbor this -week, will
speak on Walt Whitman at a semi-pri-
vate meeting of the Graduate English
club and members of the French de-
partment at 8 o'clock on April 28 in
Helen Newberry residence.

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