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April 25, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-25

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hi

:43 AL-

V

PRE
DAY AND N
SER1

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN TUESDAY, APRIL 25, 1922 PRICb

SMITH CRITICIZES
DAILY EDITOBRL

U'

Declares "Making tile Faculty
in Sunday's Issue Tl
Misleating

Pay"

Os-

v

to

Vi

Y OF TEN PEAKS, ONE OF THE SCENES TO
a Best, well known lecturer, who will speak at

BE SHOWN BY DR,
8 o'clock tonight in

stand the
ersity take.
to observe
ssed at the
sterday in
at the re-
the fresh-

Pattengill auditorium.

it was
se Louis
:fused to

lowing reso-
I such cases
ling that: In
who refuse
traditions as
ncil shall be
'd by. their
he Michigan
blish the pic-
reasons for
ed for in ar-

u
y Vernon
he coun-

1 to
Hil-

e same
discus-

heard and the
ad in all its
aker' attempted
.mpion Orr and
ds employed in

roved in vain, however,
Ity were plainly of thd
some action should be'
class as' a unit to make
iples and show its dis-
r's conduct. Some were
,ed as to suggest a com--
Lbers visit Orr in order
impress forcibly upon
nse disapproval of his

Dr. Cora j. lBest
Lectures Tonight
"Adventuring" is the subject of a
lectuie to be given at 8 o'cl'ock to-
night in Pattengill auditorium by Dr.
Cora Johnstone Best, widely known
lecturer and international traveller,
for the benefit of the Ann Arbor
Teachers' club. Slides covering ter-
ritory of more than. 600 square miles
and- motion pictures taken 'among
some o the highest mountains of the
world will be used as a supplement
to the talk.
Special government privileges
granted by the secretary of the inte-
rior, including the right to collect
specimens and use government guides
off the 'regular trails have been of
great assistance to Dr. Best in her
long travels. Canadian government
officials have granted similai privi-
leges.
Dr. Best gave a similar lecture here
last year on the subject, "Bringing
the Mountins to Mohamed." Her col-
lection of slides to be used tonight is
altogether new, a large part being
taken from the far-stretched ranges
of National park.
VAN TYNE APROES SON'S
REfUSR TO_ WEAR,,TOQUE
PROFESSOR BACKS FRESHMAN'S
'.ACTION BECAUSE HE WAS
COERCED'
Editor The Michigan Daily:-
Because of the unfortunate inter-
pretation that some of my friends
have placed upon The Daily's com-
ment upon the matter of wearing the
freshman cap, I feel it necessary for
me to explain the facts in regard to
my son in that particular matter.
Tr Had Worn Pot
In the early part of the colleg year
when my son was pledged to a fra-
ternity and when he thought some-
body would be interested in whether
he worea freshman cap or not, he
wore it and later, the toque. When
for reisons which I heartily approve,
he handed in his resignation to the
fraternity, he reasoned that there was
nobodyawho would beconcerned -as
to 'what he did in the matter, and
when the change was made from the
toque to the cap, he began wearing
a hat. When this fact was noticed
by the student discipline committee,
some oficious fellow threatened my
son with violence if he did not wear
his freshman cap. Had a representa-
tive .of. the committee come to him
like a gentleman, and reasoned with
him that his conduct made it difficult
to enforce the traditions with other
freshmen, and that his acquiescence
would help the committee, I am sure
that he would have agreed to fall in
with the custom. Being a boy of
spirit, he naturall.y refused to be co-
erced by threats.
Committee Tries Force
The vigilance committee then at-
tempted in the most vowdy and law-'
less way to force obedience. While I
was away from home and they felt
safe, they came to my house,'
rang the bell, and when my son ca ie
to the door, four or five big rowdies
tried to seize him and drag him out.
He escaped them and ran into the
house and then my wife met them and
told them what she thought of their
oonduct. They threatened her with what
would happen, but she laughed at
them, and when she asked for their
names which they refused to give, she
told them she could identify every
one of them, as, indeed, I am sure she
could. Alarmed at the idea of being
identified, they left at once.
Upon my return, I learned these
facts, and meeting the chairman of
the Stdent council, I told him frankly
my opinion of such conduct. He

asked me to have a talk with my son,
which I arrnged, and whet they met,
a plan was fixed upon which we sup..
posed ended the matter. My son re-
(Continued on Page Six)

CAMAIN LEADERS
WILL MEET TODAY1
Plans to Be Completed for "Fresh
Air Camnp" Drive; Will Also
Solicit Faculty
LELAND KIRKPATRICK, '23E .
HEADS TAG-DAY COMMITTEE
Fraternity representatives for the
campaign to raise $1,500 for the
second Michigan "Fresh Air Camp"
will meet at 3 o'clock today in the 'up-
per reading rpom of the Union to
complete all plans. Sorority repre-
sentatives will meet at 4 o'clock in
Newberry hall,
Will Solicit Faculty
A' complete solicitation of members
of the faculty will be started today
under ┬░the direction of James Hume,
'23. It is the intention of this com-
mittee to call on every member per-
sonally to give them. an opportunity
to provide, some happiness for city
kids.
Plans for the tag-day to be held
Thursday are practically completed
according to the committee headed by
Leland Kirkpatrick, '23E. These
plans call for a number of booths on
the campus so that everyone can
have their chance to contribute. All of
these committees are. operating under
the direction of Duke Dunne, '24L,
general chairman, and Jack Kelly,
'24L, assistant chairman.
Plan to Double Attendance
: The plan this year is .to double the
attendance at last year's camp by
providing accommodations .for 300
boys. This number will not begin to
take care of the number of applica-
tions which are already being receiv-
ed, but it is hoped to give the camp
a continuous growth.'
The money which is to be gathered
from the students and faculty will be
used only for the maintenance of the
camp and the transportation of the
boys. Alumni will take care of the
equipping of the camp 'and will pro-
vide the site.
ARMS REDUCTION
LEADER TO SPEAK.
Fredeick J. Libby, executive secre-
tary of the National Council for Re-
duction of Armaments, will give an
address on "The Washington Confer-
ence, the Kelley Naval Bill, and Perm-
anent Peace," at a public meeting at
7:30 o'clock tonight in Lane hall,
The movement represented by Mr.
Libby is alco-operative effort on the
part of 40 women's, religious, and
farmer's orgaiizations.
Mr. Libby has 'traveled in many parts
of Europe and Asia and in 1918 he
served with the Quaker relief commit'
tee in Europe. $ie graduated from the
Andover Theological seminary, and lat-
er studied at Oxford and in Germany.
FORMER FOOTBAL MAN DIES
AFTER MASTOID OPERATION'
Harry B. McCallum, '21M, of Mid-
land, died Sunday morning in the Uni-
versity hospital from complications
following a mastoid operation. He was
taken ill while completing his interne
training in Detroit. He was 26 years
old.
MacCallum was a member of Beta
Theta Pi and Nu Sigma Nu fraternities.
He belonged to the Owls and Galens,
and was on the Varsity football squad
in 1919.
The funeral will be held this after-
noon at his home in Midland.
Whipple to Attend Council Meet
Prof. Guy M. Whipple, of the School
of Education,'will attend the National
Research Council meeting in Wash-
ington, D. C., this week.

Don't forget your athletic book or
treasnres receipt, for registration.

SAYS PAY OFTEN INCREASED (
WITHOUT' MAKING -PROMOTION
Eitor of Michigan Daily:
Your editorial column on Sunday,1
April 23, contained an article to which1
it is necessary officially to take ex-F
ception. The article was headed
"Making the Faculty Pay." The read-
ing thereof raises one of those recent-z
ly rather frequent and very moving
pictures of young editorial shoulders(
bowed with the weight of responsi-r
bilities which the people of the statej
in their constitution and statutes en-
deavored to lay upon the Regents and9
faculty.
Without pausing here to consider
whether if University affairs go wrong,t
the public will demand an accounting
from the editors of The Daily and
their fellow students, or from the Re-'
gents and faculty, may I make'certain
statements which have the advantage
of those appeaiing in your editorial
in that they are blunt rather than in-
ferential, and they are true rather
than misleading."
I will make no reference to your
caption "Making the Faculty Pay,"
beyond observing that it seems to be
intended to suggest an idea of evil
and yet leave an ample hole for 8dl
)rial retirement should its sinister
inference arouse effective opposition.
One-third Get Promotion
There ,are this year 577 faculty mem-
bers, to which fact your statement of1
600 members is fairly close. But ofi
these, 153 are already full professors
and not open to further promotion in
rank; so there are but 424 men instead
of 600 eligible to advancement in
rank. Thus promotions in rank rise
from 1 in 30 to 1 in 21. But promotion
in rank is not the only recognition
which may come; in addition there'
are increases in salaries within the
four grades of professor, associate
professor, assistant professor, and in-
structor. Aside from advancement in'
rank there were 156 increases in sal-
ary in ranks below that of full pro-
fessor, plus' 22 increases in salary
'within the grade of full professor.
Thus for the total faculty roll of
577, 198 persons, or 34 1-3 per cent,
received ;promotion in rank or ad-
vancement in salary; while if consid-
eration be ,limited to faculty members
below the full professorship, 176 per-
sons, or over 44 per cent, received
recognition in the way of promotion
in rank or, increase in salary. With
the exception of one case, 1 believe,
each promotion in rank included an
increase in salary.
Some Reach Limit3
There are usually numerous post-
dttons in anytbusinss, certainly in any
institution, the incumbents of which
have reached the limit of saary which
the position can pay. Where disap-
pointment recurs year after year, as
when funds are limited, disappoint-
ments must recur even to those whose3
efforts deserve better, the. wise 'man
will improve his status by going else-..
where. If deans and department heads
have been too kindly in breaking the
news of- disappointment to men of an-
other class, - the misfits in univer-
sity faculties, - and have not made1
sufflcien.tly plain their lack of pros-
(Continued on Pae Eight) 1
REGISTRATION INSTRUCTION
Date-Tuesday, April 25.
} Hours-8:45 to 4:15 o'clock. j
Places-
All lits-In front of the Li-
brary.}
f Engineers and architects -
Engineering arch.}
Laws-Law Bldg.}
Medics-Medical Building. j
l Education-Tappan hall. j
Combined-Dents, pharmics, 1
. homoeops, and Grads.-
1 'Waterman gymnasium.
Each student will fill out a I
I card supplied at the registra- 1
I tion place, and must present j
I with it, his University treasurer's j
I receipt or athletic book. Reg- I
j istration is a condtiion precedent I
j to the exercise of the right to I

vote at the All-campus election. I
The class officers of the vari-
ous classes will secure tables "
C and be in direct charge of the I
( registration. No other person will I
be in charge except where au-
I thorized by the election commit- i
tee. At the close of the regis- I
tration, the class offcers will I
I place the registration- cards for I
I each separate class in alphabet-
ical order, and deliver them to
I the bletion committee at the
( Michigan Union. [
I _______________________________i f

New Round Trip
Rate To Detroit
Students can now 'make four day
trips to Detroit at a saving of 80 cents
in carfare over the old round trip rate,
it was announced yesterday by A. J.
Wiselogel, station agent for the Mich-
igan Central railroad.
The new rate is $1.80, while the
former round trip fare was $2.60.
The rate becomes effective Thurs-
day, and applies to any four day per-
iod, not necessarily to week ends only.
Exta coaches will be run at rush times
Extra coaches will be run at rush
creased crowds.
A special rate was discontinued four
years ago. Previous to that time the
company made a special rate, but the
limit was three days and was In force
only during week ends. Negotiations
were made by the Union with the rail-
road company which led to the restor-
ation of the old system with several
improvements.
BOURTON TO SPEK
"University Morale" Will Be Subject
of President's Talk at Second
Meeting
CLASSES WILL BE SUSPlENDRD
AT 11 O'CLOCK TOMORROW
"University Morale" is the subject
chosen by President Marion L. Bur-
ton for his address to members of
the University at the second monthly
convocation which will ,be .held at 11
o'clock tomorrow in. Hill auditorium.
All University classes except Dental
ana Medical clinics will be dismissed
for the convocation. Deans and fac-
ulty members will be provided with
seats on the stage, and the stuent
body will occupy thd seats on the main
floor and in the balconies.
This is the second of the monthly
convocations which are being held at
the request of the Student council for
the remainder of the year. The first
was held on March 29, when Dr.
George E. Vincent, president of the
Rochefeller foundation, gave an ad-"
dress on "The School and Public
Health." This first convocation was
attended by a capacity crowd.
DAVID WILKIE TO TALK
AT PRESS 'CLUB DINNER
NOTED NEWSPAPERMAN TO TAKE
ASSOCIATED PRESS AS
SUBJECT
David J. Wilkie, Michigan manager
of the Associated Press, who will
speak at t'he' Students' Press club din-
ner at 6:15 o'clock this evening at
the Union, has chosen for his subject'
"What the Associated Press Is, and
What It, Is Not."
Mr. Wilkie started as an errand boy
in the newspaper world and has'
climbed up to his present position. Hei
has held almost every position that{
the Associated Press could provide for
him in his 20 years of newspaper
work.Y
All persons interested in journal-
ism and newspaper work are welcome
to the dinner. The adniission is 75
cents. Tickets can be secured from
Wahr's, the Union, and in the corridor
of University hall from 3 to 5 o'clock
today. The semester's dues of the
club, which amount to- 50 cents, are
also payable at this time.

PROF. HAYDEN LEAVES TODAY
FOR PHILIPPINES AND ORIENT'
Prof. J. R. Hayden, of the political
science department, leaves early this
afternoon on the first lap of his' jour-
ney to the Philippines and other points
in the East. Professor Hayden will
act as exchange professor at the Uni-
versity of the Philippines during the
next session and will then tour the
Orient, making a study of colonial
governments. He will return by way
of Paris in time for the opening of
school in the fall of 1923.
Northwestern and Wiseonsin Win
Columbus, April 24.--Northwestern
defeated Ohio State 9 to 7 in a West-
ern Conference baseball game here to-
day. Two home runs by Dempsey and
one by Johnston figured largely in the
Purple victory.
South Bend, Ind., April 24.-Wiscon-
sin'defeated Notre Dame by a 9 to 1
score in a baseball game here, today.
Don't forget to register for campus

EACH CLASSI MUi
REGISTER To['
PRIOR TO V
BOOTHS WILL BE ESTABL
FOR PURPOSE IN SEVER
BUILDINGS
L P.BULL WITHDRAW
AS UNION CANDID
Students Must Present Either
Book or Treasurer's Receip
Certification
Registration, which will be
the various class booths on th
pus from 8 to 4:15 o'clock
will be done on officialsly printe
with distinctive colors for won
men.' These cards will be alpJ
and 'will form the voting list
coming All-campu election
Tuesday. The registration is
solute prerequisite to voting.
Students who have mislaid
treasurer's receipt and also th
letic books, either of which n
presented at the time of regis
may obtain duplicates of their r
at the treasurer's office.
Blanks for the registration
furnished the class oficers w
have charge of the booths at .tl
the work is to begin. No one'
thorized persons will be permi
be at the booth and all cards r
collected, alphabeted, and.-turn
to the election committee tonig
booths ,will be located on the,,i
as follows: all lit classesn
the Library, all engineers in t
gineering arch, laws in the Lam
ing, medics in the Medical fi
combined classes in Watermia
nasium, and educational cla
Tappan hall. In case of unfa
weather, the lit booth will be
to the first fidor corridor of t
brary.
S. C. A. Ballot Changed
-All nominations have been
in to the election committee a
candidates' names have near
been announced. Due to the
drawal of both Edward T. Ra
'23, and Paul Goebel, '23E, as
dates for president of the. S. C.
nominating committee held a
meeting Sunday afternoon and
Julius Glasgow, '23, and Paul
mus, '23, to run for the' office.
Nominations for offices i the
en's League have been made
cordance with the information
lated on the point system card
out by all Universt women.
nominations- are as follows:
dent, Frances Ames, '23, ario
23, and Sadye Harwick, '23;
president, Katherine Kuhlima
and Laura Mills, '24; treasurer,
Delbridge, '24, and Elizabeth t
'24; corresponding secretary, I
ine Stafford; '24, and Doris
'24;"recording secretary, Mario:
lor, '24, and Suzan Fitch, '24;
director, Margaret Kraus and B
Champian; junior director, I
Wiemer, Dorothy Wylie, Blan
nast, and Frieda Diekhoff; an
omore director, Helen Brace a
na Kadow.
Oratorical Board NNominal
Edward T. Ramsdell, '23, an
ald. J. Roxburgh, '24, were th
inations for president of the q
sity Oratorical board. Wilfrid
ing, '24L, and Paul A. Rehmn
were nominated for vice-pr
The other nomilations were
lows: secretary, Marion F.
'24, and Catherine J. 'Staffo
and treasurer, Harold M. Dorr,
Ross A. McFarland, '23.
L. Perkins Bull, '23, has wit

his name from the list of nomi
for president of the Union. H
tering the Law school in the I
will. therefore have only a
amount of time to devote to ac
and feels that he could not do
to any further work at the Uni
PLAYERS CLUB WILL ELE(
OFFICERS TOMORROW
- Presentation of "The G1
Gate," "The Philosopher of
biggens,"' and "Cooks and Ca:
by the Players club which wc
inally scheduled for May 4, he
postponed unil May 16.
The annual business meet
the election of officers for ne
will be held at 7:30 o'clock to
Might in room 204 Iason ha
THE DAIL

meeting with
ich he stated
tions need be
Josselyn Van
ised to refrain
and faithfully
itions in the

rule.

Prs To JMeet
orrohv Night
advisors and men who
3 in the work will meet
ht at the Union to dis-
Its of the past year and
policy for the coming
eeting will be short and
that over 700 men will
this is the number nec-
ry out the plans for next
.ittee this year was ex-
uccessful in view of the
tions under which it was
is with the hope of off-
conditions and gettingE
rt that the meeting to-
has been called. Be-
iors and Juniors who
freshmen this year, Jun-
omores are asked to at-
etig to hear the plans
aims and policies of thel
BE GIVEN TONIGHT
ORS. OF LAW REVIEW
to be given tonight-at
r the editors df the Law
he faculty of the law de-
which Charles L'Hom-
litor 16 years ago, and'
at, also an ex-editor, will

There wil

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