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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 23, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN SUNDAY, APRIL 23, 1922

-.-'----~'-.~" - -----,-- ----4

,.

ERINES HUMBLE INDIANS,

BLICATIONS APPOINTS
ILY BUSINESS MANAGER;
16 EDITOR TO BE CHOSEN

ND BROWN
E OF 'ENSIAN
e Given Chimes;

Student members. of th Board in
Control of Student. Publications were
nominated also at the meeting. Elght
men were named from which number
four will be chosen at the spring elec-
tions which are to be held on May 2.
Those whom the board nominated are
as follows: B. E. Dulop, '23, John P.
Hamel, Jr.,. '23, V. F. Hillery, '23, R. 0.
Martin, '23, C. K Proctor, '23E, N. W.
Robertson, '23, B. E. Schumacker, '24L,
and Paul Watzel, '23.
Banquet, May 2
The speaker for the All-publications
banquet to be held May 4 in the as-
sembly hall of the Union will be Ar-
',thur. C. Pound, '07, of Flint. Mr.
Pound is an editor and writer of reput-
ation, his articles from time to time
- in the Atlantic Monthly bringing him
- national recognition.

s man-
s, with

managing editor of
naging editor of the
ry, and managing ed-
manager of the Ath-
-ere selected by the
of Student Publica-
ting yesterday. In
offices for which no
re made, the board
pending the receipt

3
N'
',
);
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gs Parker, '23, was
the business depart-
ly. Parker has served
>n the business staff,
dvertising and public-
its. During the pres-
s held the position of
ager:
- Given 'Ensian
n heads were chosen,
ditorship being assign-
chrayer, '23E, to suc-
Frey, '22, the present
r, andthe position of
er. being assigned to
wn, '23. Schrayer be-
e staff' of the 'Ensian
s sophomore year and
mee in the fraternity
sic, and drama section,
past yearhas been en-
ng in the feature de-
e year book. Brown
ears experience on the
staff, being assistant
usiness manager, Rob-
'22, and also 'in charge
ng.
'd, '23, was selected to
of business manager
Riford has had three
e on the business staff,
the year 1920-1921 in
advertising depart-
spring appointments
was appointed publica-
nd since then has been
focusing the attention
e national advertisers
>yle.
cCobb, '23, was chosen
r of Chimes with James
business manager and
ey, '23E, assistant busi-
McCobb has worked for
if on the editorial staff
ng which time he has
editor. Both Hume
e worked for two years
dorfer, '23, was named
Volverine with Harold
s business manager.
s been f member of!
r . for approximately'
n which publication he
reporter, feature writ-
riter and night editor.
the position of cicula-
n The Daily duringthe
rd served as assistant
ger of the Wolverine

HAIR CAMP
LEADER_ WANTED
Issue Call for Student Volunteers to
Aid in Insuring Good Time
for Kids
MEN ,CAN BE USED FOR
ALL OR PART OF OUTING
Those in charge of the second Uni-
versity Fresh Air camp have sent out
a call to men on the campus to volun-
teer hs leaders at, the camp during
the coming summer. This year's'
camp, *which will give 300 city kids
a taste of the great outdoors in four
10 day periods, has doubled its last
year's quota, with'the result that the
needs for menand money have been
increased proportionately. No salaries
are paid, but the expenses are furn-
ished. All men who can come for
the entire length of the camp, or for
one or more of the four periods are
urged to get in touch with 'Louis
Reiman,, director of the camp, at Lane
hall.

Biutts Will Speak
A~ '24L Smoker1
Prof. W. H. Butts, assistant dean of
the enginering college, will be the
principal speaker at the sophomore
engineer smoker which is to be held'
at 7:30 o'clock, Tuesday evening,
April 25, in the Michigan Union.
The social committee of the class
has arranged for an interesting and
peppy evening consisting of musical
numbers by the aVrsity Glee club, the
lvMinight Sons quartette.
COUNTV HME, DRIVE
TO' STARr,T TOMORROW,
TOWNSPEOPLE AND UNIVERSITV
FACULTY MEMBERS O
BE CANVASSED
To raise money enough to erect' a.
county home for the Salvation Army
at Fifth avenue and Washington
street, a one week financial campaign
beginning tomorrow will be carried
on among the faculty members of Oe
University under the directorship of
Prof. James H. Cissell. The residents
of Ann Arbor, though not the stu-
dents, will also be canvassed for
funds.'
The amount which is set for the
whole county is $30,000. Of this Ann
Arbor's portion is $20,000. No spe-
cial amount has been set for the Uni-
versity or for the townspeople. The
University has been divided up into
definite districts, many corresponding
to the campus buildings. All districts
will be under the controlrof cap-
tains, who are as follows: Prof. W. F.
Davidson, and Prof. J. C Brier of the
engineering department, Prof. E. C.
Goddard of the law school, Prof. A.
L. Nelson and Prof. L. C. Karpinsk4
-of the mathematics department, Mr.
H. J. McFarlan of the surveying de-
partment, Prof.GeorgetR. La Rue and
Prof. A. G. Ruthven of the zoology de-
partment, Mr. W. Grieze of the hos-
pital, and Prof. C. F. Wells of the
rhetoric department.
Student 's Puppetr
Play To fie Given

FREN'CH -PROTESTS
AGAINGRMANYI
NOTYET. ALLAYED
ECONOMIC CONFERENCE STILL
UNCERTAIN OF REPLY FROM
GERMANY

Delta Sigma Rho
Plans initiation
Delta Sigma Rho, national honorary
oratorical fraternity, will hold Initia
tion ceremonies Thursday, April 27.
The initiates are Olive Lockwood,
'22, Phillips P. Elliott, '22, K. F. Clardy,
'24, Francis Greenbaum, '22, J. B. Glas-
gow, '23, and 0. W. Rush, '22, all of
whom represented Michigan in the
Mid-West debates during the past
year.
CANDIDA~TENAD

POWERS TO SEND NOTE
ASKING REAL MEETING
Insist That Teutons Keep Out of
Discussion Refating to
RussIan Affairs
(By Associated Press)
Genoa, April 22. - The protests in
the economic conference raised yes-
terday by the French against Ger-
many's reply to the 10 power note
sujgesting that the German delega-
tion \ refrain from discussion relating
to Ru sian affairs had not been set-
tied satiafactorily up to a late hout
yesterday.l
Agrele to Another Note
At a meeting of representatives of
the 10 entrant powers late yesterday
afternoon it was agreed that another
note be. sent to the.,Germans stating
it was assumed that) they meant in
their reply transmitted Friday, to re-
frain from all Russian\.discussions in
the political commission \pf the con-
f erence.
In fact, the British and moat of the
other interested delegations so "inter-
preted the German reply, but "the
French expressed fear that the Ger-
man note left a loop hole through
which the Germans might enter into
Idiscussions of Russian' gestions not
treated in they Russo-German treaty
signed at Rapallo last Sunday.
of interesting features. O. B. Davis, of
Detroit, has executed the setting de-
sign d by Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, di-
rector 'of the play, and an effort has
been made to transform ;Hill audi-
torium into a great Chinese theater.
All the costumes are gorgeous ex-
aiples of Chinese art, 'being from the
collections of :Mrs. Henry Adams, and
Mr. George Fong of Detroit.
Prof. :f. k. Cross Lectures In East
Prof. Herbert R. Cross, of the fine
arts department, returned last week
from Philadelphia, where lie attended
the convention of the College Art as-
sociation held in the College of Fine
Arts ;of the ,University of Pennsyl-
vania.
Professor Noss delivered' a paper
on "RefinemeA in Greek Sculpture."
3fcCormack to Sail for Europe
New York, April 22r - John' Mc-
Cormack,- ramous Irish tenor, who re-
cently was reported near death from
a throat infection, 'will sail for Lon-
don on May 2, it was announced to-
day. He will spend the summer in
England and Ireland recuperating.
All his engagements in America ,have
been cancelled.,

Holds Enemy Safe Aft
son Weakened by A
Inner Defe

Nominating Committee Chooses Five
Men to Run for the
Presidency
TWO NOMINEES PICKED FOR
STUDENT COUNCILMAN SEAT
Nominees for Union offices for the
coming year whose names will be
voted upon at the All-campus election
May 2, were chosen yesterday atter-
noon by the nominating committee of
the Union.
The committee, consisting of Richey
B. Reavill, '22L, Paul Moore, '22M,
George Gregory, '22E, Francis M.
Smith, '22, and Brewster' Campbell,
'22, selected the following men as
candidates: for president of the
Union, James Stevens, '23, Thomas
J. Lynch, '23E, Thomas I. Underwood,
'23L, Robert Neale, '23E, and Perkins
Bull, '3.
The following men will run for re-
cording secretary: John M. Burge,
'23, and Bert Uebele, '23E; for lit
vice-president, Sheldon M. Brown, '23,
James W. Hume, '23, and Robert E.
Adams, '23, for engineering vice-pres-
ident, Frank 1E. Camp, ' 23E, and John
W. Ros.s, '2'3E; for medical vice-pres-
ident, George C. Stucky, '23M, and
'Walter O. ;lingman, '23M; for law
vice-president, Earl Boxell, '23L, and
John M. W~ntersi, '23L; for combined
vice-president (phar'mics, dents, and
homoeopaths), John G. Searle, '23P,
Gilbert T. Ely, '24D, iccbert M. Win-
slow, '231
The committee also selected two
men whose names will appear on the
campus ballots as candidates at large
for the offices of student councilmen.
The men selected were Robert Knode,
'23, and Stanley Muirhead, '24.
10YELloI JACKET" I
E 'AMERIIAN .IN THEME

Two runs scored in t
inning were the only cou
ed by the Wolverines to
game against Illinois on
yesterday afternoon. Aft
captain and first sacker, M\
opened the Indian half cf
witha home run Michiga:
and with a triple and de
ed by a single garnered a
which won them the game
verines added another ri
eighth inning, making the
3-1.

SHAPHITTIN
'PINCHES FEA MC I'NR

VARSITY MAKES TRI]
AND SINGLE GOOD
RUNS IN FI
DIXON ALLOWS
HITS, GIV4Sf

C

r F

Camp May Move
The site of the camp 'which lastsum-
mer was situated 10 miles north of
Port Huron, on the lake shore may
possibly be moved inland this year,
where an excellent location on the
banks of Lake Pleasant has,- been
found, which is more adapted to the
needs of the camp than the former1
site. As yet definite information re-1
garding this matter has not been re-4
ceived, and it will be necessary to
withhold action until word can be
received from the owners of the prop-
erty.
"Dad" Lockwood, nationally known,
expert in birds, insects, and nature
study, has again been' secured for the
summer months.' Through the Juven-
ile court, Mother's Pension bureau,
the Detention Home, and Children's
Aid society, the youngsters are to be
collected from the various lower:
Michigan cities, to which proportion-'
ate allotments have been made.
'U of M Club Approves a .
The U of M club, of Detroit, Qfi-
cially endorsed the movemnt at its
meeting last week, at which time 75
of the youngsters who attended the
camp last summer were present.
Word has also been received from the
Alumni association of Flint, which
sends its heartiest endorsement and
most enthusiastic support.
FRESHMEN TO PARTICIPATE -
IN DECLAMATION CONTEST
More than 10 freshien have signi-
fled their'intention _of entering the

.Petite Red Riding Hood, her wea -
ened-faced grandmother, a woodsman;
with rheumatism, a wooly black ca-;
nine, and a ferocious, red-mouthed
wolf, Will all be seen on a miniature
stage at 3 o'clock Saturday at Lane
hall. The occasoin is the presentatiofl
by Harry L. Burnett, '23, of a program
of marionette acting, under the au-
spices of the Child Conservation
league.
Burnett has been at work for months
working out the details of the show,
which in its final rehearsals was re-
markably life-like in its character.,
Two plays will be presented, "Little
Red Riding Hoodj' and "Moon Magic,"
a fantasy in one scene, by Forman G.
Brown, '22, composer of this year's
opera score. In "Moon Magic,' which
comes first on the program, dolls eight
inches high are used. The mechanics
of this fauttasy have been carefully
planned under the joint direction of
Burnett and 'Brown, a d the result is
pleasingly effective. In "Little Red
Riding Hood," a play adapted from the
old fable, dolls 20 inches high are
used.
Reading and singing will be done by
a cast picked from some of the best
student talent available.
DR. BEST TO GIVE
TRAVELS LECTURE

,McCurdy lits Home
'Crosbley, leadoff man for
opened the game by fouling
and was followed by Roett
was an easy out to Uteritz.
the third hitter on the Illir
then came through with a blc
left center, one of the longE
ever seen on Ferry field. It
a homer and was the only r
the Suckers counted.
Uteritz, leadoff man for
knocked the first ball Jack
ed to him on another long
left center, but it was only
three bases. Wimbles foll
was an easy out second to
ritz being held on third. Bc
the next man up, clouted a
ble down the first base lin
Uteritz. Shackleford was
connect safely but Harry F
the game on ice by a slash
which scored Knode.
Pitchers Tighten
From the first inning on I
practically invincible. yield
four more hits, all of which
gles, and at no time was hE
danger. Jackson, the Illir
also tightened up and the Vf
made only three more hits
run. Two of the five Suck
came in the ninth frame '
one gone, Dixon appeared
somewhat. MIuch of the cre
victory goes to the Wolverii
H-e wvas in wonderful form
only one free pass to the in
while the opposing moundsn
four tickets to the Wolverh
In the eighth inning UtE
first man, hit through Ste
Illini shortsop. Wimbles p
Jackson but Bob Knode
Utz to second by coaxing a
of Jackson. Shackleford fc
cracking one 'at Stewart, w
it allowing Uteritz to cross
for the third Michigan r
drew a pass from Jacl5son z
his third of the game. This
bases but neither Kline r
were able to come thl'ougl
inning ended with three
runners on the sacks.
Dixon Holds Off Atta
Illinois had a man on th
every inning from the secc
sixth and again in the last
the tight pitching of Dixo
of the'm away from the third
Curdy being the only man I
the keystone base.
Peden and Stewart singl
utively in the last inning
man was out, but two pin
put in by the Illini were bot
ed to pop into the air, onE
In center .and the other to
(Continued on Page '

Although the Chinese play, "Yellow
Jacket," has been played in practic-
ally- every civilized country in the
world, sumptuous productions having
been given in London, Munich, Buda-
pest, Vienna and Berlin, it is, accord-
ing to Henri Pierre Roche, the French
critic one of the most distinctly Am-
erican plays ever written. "It has the
daring which marks it as the product
of a new, adventurous continent," he
gays. Frohman said that it would go
around the world, and it' has, only to
come back home to be recognized as a
permanent. part of American.litera-
ture.
The production of the play by
Masques next Saturday night in Hill
auditorium offers an unusual number
AMERICAN iAMBASSADOR NOW
RESIDES AT WILHELMPLATZ

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Directory Business
vent, '23E, was select-
as business manager
Directory, the posi-
t editor to be filled by'
ent. Dyinent has been
the business staff of
the past two years.

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NOTICE

president
ary class
rs of the
will be a
freshmen

Dr. Cora Johnstone Best, interna-
freshman declamation contest which is tional traveller and lecturer, will
being sponsored by the University Or- speak at 8 o'clock Tuesday evening
atorical association sometime during inPattengill auditorium on "Adven-
the first two weeks In May, the ex- turing," for the benefit of the Ann Ar-1
act date not being selected as yet. . bor Teachers' club. Her lecture will}
The declamations which should be be elaborated with slides and moving
such length that they may be given in pictures taken among the mountains,
about seven minutes, may be on any many at great altitudes. The terri-
subject, and either written by the tory which the slides and pictures
speaker or selected from standard cover is estimated at about six square
works. miles.
Dr. Best in .her travels has been
White Hurt in Train Wreak greatly aided by special privileges
Zanesville, 0.,' April 22. - Former granted by the secretary of the inte-
Democratic National Committee Chair- Ior permitting her to collect sped-;
man George White of Marietta, Ohio, mens and to use government guides
was among eight passengers injured off the regular trails. She has also
late this afternoon when a Baltimore had similar permission from Canadian
and Ohio passenger train was wreck- I officials.
ed 12 miles south of this city. An She lectured here last year on,
engineer was killed. White's injuries "Bringing the Mountains to Mo-

REGISTRATION INSTRUCTION
Date-Tuesday, April 25.
- Hours-8:45 to 4:15 o'clock.
Places-
All lits-In front of the Li-
brary.I
Engineers and architects,--
Engijieering arch.
Laws-Law Bldg.
Medics-Medical Building.
Education-Tappan hall.
Combined-Dents, pharmics,
homoeops, and Grads.-
Waterman gymnasium.
Each student will fill out a
card' supplied at the registra-
tion place, and must present
with it, his University treasurer's
receipt or athletic book. Reg-
istration is a condtiion precedent
to the exercise of the right to
vote at the All-campus election.
The class officers of the vari-
ous classes will secure tables
and be in direct charge of the,
registration. No other person will
be in charge except where au-
thorized by the election commit-
tee. At the close of the regis-
tration, the class officers will
place the registration cards for
each separate class in alphabet-
ical order, and deliver them to
the election committee at the
Michigan Union.

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Berlin, April 22. -- The American
embassy at Wilhelmplatz again houses
a- fully accredited ambassador. The
concluding formality in effecting com-
plete and formal restoration of'diplo-
matic relations between the United.
States and Germany having been dis-

posed of at noon today when Allan-' -Iisslsslppi Breaks
son B. fHoughton, placed in the hands New Orleans, April 22.
of President Ebert his letters of ore- mately 600 men were batt
dence, designating him "ambassador to close a 70 foot break in
extraordinary and plenepotentiary", sippi river levee in the Mi
of the United States government to130 milessouth of this' ci
Germany. -indicated the workers had
pects for success. After
HEALTH SERVICE HAS RECORD early today the river
BUSINESS DURING PAST MONTH away a section of the
was almost submerged a
A total of 5,835 dispensary calls and wide. The arrival of en
353 room calls, the largest number of workmen with necessary
office and room calls that has ever fight the flood prevente
been reported from the University from being extended.
Health service, isy shown by the
monthly report for March. During Ohio Defeats Pu
the month of March the mild epidemic (By Associated P
of influenza subsided, but there were Columbus,-0., April 22.
a large number of other afflictions re- playing its first Western

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