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April 22, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIVAL NOTES

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T Illlli I r 1 ,
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produce enough great dra-
our own use.
ett said that he thought the
hool should not only train
r the dramatic work, but
uild also train them to ap-
d to understand the great
so doing it would not only
idents trained in this work,
d also stimulate all classes

.. In
the s

e Points to Harvardf
g "Harvard university and Carnegie
i Institute of Technology," he said,
f "seem far to surpass all other schools
I in the advancement of this work, al-
though the University of California is
s now coming to the front. I hope to
see the day when Michigan will be
e known for its great work along this
- line, and I believe it shall, though I do
not believe that day can come until a
a chair ofthe drama has been well es-
d tablished."
it
In discussing the use of such dra-
matic cources for the students of the
r medical, engineering, law, dentistry,
t and scientific professIons, Mr. Hack-
ett said that it was indispensable to
them, as it trained them forpersonality
%nand for expression, 'two of 'the three
e greatest factors in the' success of life.
is
I Mr. Hackett commended the work of
" E. Motimer Shuter on the annual
rt operas, and said that he was exceed-
e ingly glad to learn that we now had
such a theatre as the Mimes.
it
o PROFESSOR HOBBS. EXPECTED
lc TO SAIL FOR HOME IN MAY
y Professor W. H. Hobbs of the Geo-
It logydepartment and exchange profes-
-I sor in Holland, will finished ns work
e there shortly. Hie expects to sail May
a 4th, from Cherboug, France to Guada-
e Iduie, one of the islands of the West
e Indies. He will spent a short time
r there and then go to South Amierica
ly where he expects to be for most of the
is summer.

RICCADO MARTIN, TENOR
Riccardo Martin, the Qhicago Opera
Company tenor who will sing the title
role in "Tannhauser" at the Saturday
evening May Festival concert, and will
also sing. in the presentation of Fred-
erick Stock's new "Psalmodic Rhap-
sody" at the Friday evening concert,
is a thorough American product.
He was born at Hopkinsville, Ky., in
1879. He studied for a time with Ed-
ward MacDowell at Columbia Univer-
sity, subsequently going abroad forS
further instruction.
Debut at Nantes !
Upon his return to this country he
taught singing for a time in New York .
City. In 1904 he again went abroad,
this time making his debut as Faustt
at the Theatre de la Renaissance,
Nantes, France. During the season of
1905-1906 he made successful appear-
ance in Verona and Milan, and then
returned to America.
During the next nine years Martin
sang almost entirely in ' the Unitedl
States. He toured the country with the
San Carlo Opera company in 1906-
1907, and from 1907 to 1915 he sang at
the Metropolitan, proving his versa-
tility in the following roles of the1
classical repertory: Faust (Gounod and
Boito), Manrico. Rhadames, Des
Greux, Turlddu, Cano, Rodolpho
Ma,o. Cavardossi, Pinkerton, Don
Jose, Enzo, Romeo and Andrea Chen-
ler.
Wins Success in London
He has also appeared in the teno
roles of Puccini's "Girl of the Golden
West," Catalini's "La Wally" and Vic-
tor Herbert's "Natoma." During the
season of 1910-1911 he duplicated his
American successes at Covent Garden,
London.
Aside from his singing, Martin has
done considerable work as acomposer,
especially in the smaller forms such
as the song and chorus.
THEM-UNIVERSITY'S
COMMON HEALTH
The week of May 1st to 8th has been
designated as "National Physical ul-
ture Week," by the Chairman of the
National. Physical Culture Week com-
mittee. The following health regula-
tions forthe personal health program
for 'National Physical Culture Week
are being distributed throughout the
country: ,
1. Spend 10 minutes in setting-up
exercises.
2. Sleep with windows open. Secure
what sunshine you can.
3. Spend a minimum of 10 hours
during the week in the open air, Bal-
ance work and play.
4. Walk at least three miles each
da.'
5.Treat your stomach with respect.
.Do not over-eat.
6. Eat meat not more than once a
'day.
7:. Balance your meals 'wth. fruit,
green salads, and other vegetables.
8. Drink at least eight. glasses of
pure water daily.
9. Completely relax for 15 minutes
each day and conserve your nerve
energy. t
10. Cultivate happy thoughts. Think
in terms of health. Arrange all plans
for 'the week upon a basis such that
each day's activities will be consistent
with the requirements of keeping fit.
ThetNational Physial g ulture Week
committee of 119 W. 40 th St., New
York City, will send free upon request
I a chart of setting-up exercises and the
properly balanced diet.
CONTRIBUTIONS FOR COLLEGE
ANTHOLOGY ARE REQUESTED

Anthology for 1922 will be the sixth
volume published.
The past year Michigan was fairly
well represented. Several poems that
appeared in issues of Whimsies were
published in this volume.
JOURNALISM DEPARTMENT TO
NAME TWO FOR SCIENCE PAER
Opportunity has been given the
Journalism department of the Univer-
sity to recommend two students for
positions on The Christian Science
Monitor. Two seniors will be chosen
by this department to work for two
months of the summer on the staff of
this paper.
The editor of The Christian Science
1%onitor recently extended this oppor-
tunity to Michigan. Columbia is the
only other university in the country
that hay been accorded the same priv-
ilege.
S.:C. A. Pledges Due May First
All subscriptions to the Student
Christian association fund are payable
May 1. This is the reminder givenby
the committee in charge of the- fund.
It is hoped that all amounts will be
paid in promptly on pr before that time
so that adequate arrangementscan bet
made for next year. So far a little'
more than half of the total pledged
has been received.

will be used to
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NO PAPE

Students who wish to submit poems
for possible inclusion in this year's
College Anthology are requested to
send their contributions not later than
May 15, to Dr. Henry T. Schnittkind,
the Stratford company, 12 Pearl street,
Boston, Mass.
This volume, entitled "The Poets of
the Future," contains poems selected
from those sent in by students in dif-
ferent universities in the country. The
poems chosen to be printed are con-
sidered to- be the best and are repre-
sentative of the type of poetry the mod-

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