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April 19, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-19

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ASSOCIA
PRESS
*fl DAY AND NIGH.

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Zi~ SEJIVICI

I

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN WEDNESDAY, APRIL 19, 1922

PRICE

.-. -- - --

WERLE ADDRESSES
MEDICAL SOCIETY
"There seems'to be no co-ordinat-
ed effort on the part of municipal and
statb institutions to stamp out tuber-
culosis either by educating the public
of its danger and insidiousness or by
actually combatting it through sani-I
tariums and open air camps and in-f
REDS stitutions," said Theodore J. Werle,
CD. executive secretary of the Michigan
Tuberculosis society, 'in an addressl
which he delivered last night at the
Union before the members of th61
[S Michigan Trudeau society, an organi-
S 30 zatilon composed of physicians of this
state.
"One of the main purposes of the
ushed Michigan Tuberculosis society is ag-
d gressively to educate the public as to
the glaring need of open air camps, of
state sanitariums, and of institutions=
to stamp out the dreaded disease," he
said.
3rrific Dean Hugh Cabot, and Dr. A. C.
s the Furstenberg of the medical school,
e cen- and Dr. J. H. Elliott of Toronto, Can-
ilting ada, spoke with respect to the scien-
miss- . tific aspect of the disease.
mliins t

┬░FORD, HISTONRN,
in
LhECTRSOA

udes only those
the full effect oft
>f others in secti
the path of the t
and the total is1
nd the 500 mark.
ndiana were stru
list of known dead
while in Indiana
have been report
orts are believed
there are some ar(
which no word I
:ommunication lir

be-
ack
in
19
ed.
to
eas
Las
nes

Formerly Manuscript Division Chief of
Congressional Library'; Expert
VAdviser Now
GIVEN HONORARY DEGREE BY
UNIVERSITY TWO YEARS AGO
"A Map of Virginia" will be the sub-
ject of the lecture to be given at 4:15
o'clock today'in Natural Science audi-
torium by Worthington C. Ford, the
well known author, historian and 11-
brarian. A second lecture will be de-,

were killed in Mis-
ansas, Michigan, and
heavy property dam-

ACHITECTS NAMED
Smth, Hinchman, Grylls to Supervise
Building; More Contracts to
Be Let Soon
YOST HOPES CONSTRUCTION
WORK WILL START MAY 15
Every effort is being bent by the
athletic authorities toward the early
completion of the new athletic field
house on Ferry field. With the selec-
tion of architects for the building and
the expectation of receiving bids and
letting contracts in the near future,
Coach Fielding H. Yost, chairman o
the committee in charge of the proj-
ect, hopes that work will be com-
menced on the structure by May 15.
Work will. be rushed throughout the
summer so that the field house will
be comp-leted in the fall by the time
inclement weather plays havoc with
football practices. It will at least be
ready by Nov. 1, it is thought by Coach
Yost.
The general architects for the build-
ing as announced by Coach Yost are
Smith, Hinchman, and Grylls of De-
troit. The plan for the mechanical
equipment, the heating, lighting, and
ventilating facilities of the buildings
are being taken care of by Vernor,
Wilhelm, and Molby, also of Detroit.
Mr. Vernor is a 'resident of Ann Ar-
bor and formerly was a member of
the faculty.
Final'plans for the field house are
being rushed to completion by these
firms, and with the sbmission of the
last drafts and specifications, bids
will be received and the contracts let.
in term eyer TO
'Read Works Of
Amenan Poets
.Certain American Poets" is the
subject of an address to be given by
Louis iUntermeyer at 8 o'clock'tomor-
row night in Hill auditorium. He will
give a number of readings selected
from his own poems and those of con-
temporary American poets.
Included in this group of readings
there will be poems by Robert Frost,
by all of the other poets who will
appear in Ann Arbor in this series
of talks by American poets, and some
by Mrs. Untermeyer, as well as many
written by himself.
Untermeyer is well known as a
critic and has published several books
of criticisms of new poetry,' many of'
which are written in the form of par-
odies. All of his criticisms are said
to be characterized by a sane and
healthy attitude -which is entirely free
from morbidness. His sensitive sym-
pathy enables him to find a beauty in
the everyday world and causes him
to modulate his opinons concerning
the poems of others into comprehen-
sive appreciations.
During their stay in Ann Arbor,
Mr. and Mrs. Untermeyer will be the
house guests of Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Frost. Mr. Untermeyer will speak in
Detroit Friday night but will return
to Ann Abor for an evening with the
staff and guests of Whimsies Satur-
day.
South flaven Alumni to Organize
Michigan alumni at South Haven
will meet this evening for the forma-
tion of an alumni organization in that
city. Coach Fielding H. Yost, director
of athletics, ' bill e' the principal,
speaker at the new organization's
banquet tonight.., ,R
Today is "1W" Day.-

FURTHER RETURNS
SWELL POOL FUND

Solicitors' Reports Bring Total
$2,200; Final Figures Not
Obtainable

WOMEN, SPRING, ART, ALL COMBINED iN
APRIL GARGOYLE WHICH APPEARS TODAY

to

s tonight still were mov
,d; and apparently ha
full force, subsiding I
to snow or hail with hig
3 towns where the heav
occurred are: Indiana-
lliamsport, Orestes, Brool
ois-Hildago, Ogden, Fith
Missouri-Warsaw.
undreds of families wer

Spring, love, women, and the joys
of getting back from a vacation are
all combined in the April issue of the
Gargoyle that is to show itself to the
campus under the bluerand red of a
dazzling cover this morning.
Poetry Abounds,
Especially are the women in evi-
dence. The preface degenerates from
its usual sedate nature to burst orth
in a spring poem all about f'stive
damsels and how they w4ll not let the
mere males see their "bloomin'
play."' An editorial speaks again for
the women. It is entitled, "We Want
Our Rights," and it deplores the fact
that students who have "theoretically
at at least attained an age where they
do some thinking for themselves" are
not allowed to know the- reasons why
they are iestricted. Even the frontis-
piece cruelly shows a man of the fu-
ture being scornfully directed 'to the

side door of the Women's league
building.
Parody Published
"A Tonsorial Elegy" is a "troja-
nowski about an unsophisticated col-
lich boy who was lured into the not-
some shades of a tonsorial den andl
had 'his. doubloons massaged away."
A novel and a. sequel to a novel-are)
combi'ig in "Found in the Limber-
found," a mock drama of life. Donald
Ogden Stewart, renowned writer, has
'no--not written for the Gargoyle-but
had his work made the subject of a
parody, "Collegiate Casualities." There
is also a poem, "Study Hours in a
Sorority House."
Art work is prominent in the num-
ber. After the cover and frontispiece'
there is a cartoon entitled, "A Typical
College Dance," that may jncrease the
popularity of the weak end- entertain-
ments in Ann Arbor dance halls. .

livered to history department .stu-
dents at ,4 :15 o'clock tomorrow after-
tnoon in room 224 Natural Science
n building, the subject being "Some
'h Presidential Papers.'
r Advises Regents
- Mr. Ford received the degree of
k Doctor of Laws from the University
- n .the spring of 1920, which ,'was
awarded in recognition of him as an
e authority on American history, At
d that time the Regents were in Boston
s inspecting the collection of the Massa-
d chusetts Historical society, the oldest
and most famous of American his-
torical associations.
He'showed them the various docu-
ments of the collection and impress-
ed them with his vast knowledge and
experience. Regent Clements asked
Tadvice as to his collection in antici-
pation of his 'future gift to 'the Uni-_

:er
I.te

FOR

_I

FOR'
a_-
iittinn -

versity.
Located at Providence
Mr. Ford was for several years
chief of the manuscript' division of
the Library of Congress aid is at
present expert adviser to the John
Carter Brown library at Providence,
which is the only American historical
library which exceeds the Clements
library' in value.
While inAnn Arbor he will be the
guest of Prof. U. B. Phillips, of the
history department.

already

for
and

Thieves Enter Tailor Shop
More than $1,000 worth of tailoring
goods was stolen early yesterdayj
morning from the J. Karl Malcolm
tailoring shop at 604' East Liberty'
street by thieves of whom the local
police have yet no definite trace. The
robbers entered the shop by way of
the back door some time after mid=1
'night.

EXTENSION CAMPAIGN WILL
SUPPLEMENT VACATION DRIVE
Reports from returning members of
the swimming pool committee yester-
day 'brought the fund to a total of
$2,200. Final figures as a result of
the vacation drive cannot be ascer-
tained for several days, becauseof the
number of men who have not yet re-
ported their subscriptions.
An extension of the campaign, in or,
der to canvass every alumnus who
has not subscribed to the pool fund or
who was not solicited in the course
of the drive during vacation, has been
undertaken by the committee with
headquarters at. the Union.
This extension campaign will be
carried on by mail and personal calls,
according to those in charge, until an
approach to the quota of 28,000 is
realized.%
With plans for the extension cam-
paign already in force it is expected
that the campaign will occupy the at-
tention of the 'committee for at least
another month. The personnel of the
committee which was active during
the vacation will continue intact dur-
ing the remainder of the campaign.
DELEGATES LEAYE FOR
STUDENT CONFEENCE
GOETZ AND HILLERY SELECTED
BY COUNCIL TO ACT AS
REPRESENTATIVES,
Representatives from the University
will leave today for the Mid-West Stu-,
dent Conference of Colleges and Un-
iversities which begins tomorrow
morning at Lexpigton, Kentucky.
Angus M. Goetz, '22M, president of the
Student council, and Vernon F. Hill-
ery, '23, secretary of the council, were
chosen by the council to represent'
Michigan.
Goetz left y'esterday and Hillery
will leave today. They will meet in
Cincinnati and will go from there to
Lexington. The purpose of this con-
fercence, according to the constitution
of the organization, is to discuss stu-
dent problems and student self-gov-
frnment of different colleges and un-
iversities for mutual help and sugges-
tions.
Seek Plan of Government.
The real purpose of the conference
is to find some tangible form for stu-
dent government that can be used in
all colleges. The conference will
deal with all phases of student gov-
ernment and student activities, in-
cluding elections, publications, music,
dramatics, and athletics. At present
there are 23 colleges and universi-
ties in the organization. This is the1
first year that Michigan has been rep-
resented, although the association did
meet last year at Columbia, Missouri.
Faculty Members Also Meet
Seteral other conventions are being
held in Lexington at the same time.
Dean John R. Effinger will'.attend the
conference of the deans of liberal arts
colleges of the Middle West. Dean
Joseph A. Bursley leaves today to
attend the meeting of the deans or
advisers of men of Mid-West institu-
tions held in the same ctiy.
Sadler to Address Fresh Engineers
Prof. H. 0. Sadler, of the depart-
ment of naval architecture and marine
engineering, will address freshman
engineers at 11 o'clock today in room'
348, Engineering building.
Today eii s Da.

IND0IN' SITUATION-UP H L I D
-VAN TYNE
History Department Head Confers w4thi
Leaders of Politds, Includ-
ing Ghandi
STUDIES LEGISLATIVE BODIES
FOR THREE MONTHS' PERIOD
"The political situation in India is
without parallel in the history of the
world," Prof. C. H. Van Tyne, head of
the history department, declared yes-
terday in' relating his experiences
during his recent three months' study
of the political conditions in India.
The opportunity to: study the new
creation by the British government
of the Indian legislative assembly,
which -is a parliament in embryo, was
the inducement which drew Professor
Van Tyne to India.
Meets Lord Reading'
In India he talked with representa-
tives of all points of view from Ma-
hatma Ghandi, the greatest of all In-
dian leaders, to Lord Reading, the
viceroy. In speaking further of Ghan-
di, Professor Van Tyne stated that he
is probably the least likely person to
be taken for a leader of men. In ap-
pearance he is described as very small
in stature, homely, and thin, showing
the results of his fasting and ascetic-
ism. He is not aggressive in his man-
ner as might befit the mien of a man
of importance, but on the contrary is
of a quiet and meditative nature,
Professor Van Tyne was permit-
teA to sit at the council table with the
bitterest enemies of the British
regime, to listen to the most seditious
talk' concerning the government, ond
later to sit with governors of prov-
inces and their minsters of state in
order to acquire their angle of vi-
Sion.
Attends Bengal Council
In Calcutta he had a two hours'
confidential talk with C. R. Das, the
Bengal leader of the extremists, and
not long after sat in -the Bengal leg-
islative council during a session of
that body.
X The tropical climate says Professor
Van Tyne is a terrific burden upon
Europeans and Americans, visiting or
working in India. Members' of the
British administration in the country
may almost be considered transient,
going to and leaving India at more
or less reguar intervals.
"The handicap of a devitalizing
Tropical climate makes one .wonder
whether any people subjected to it
continuously could develop those
qualities necessary for self rule," he
remarked. -
Sigma Delta Chi Meets Tonight
Sigma Delta Chi will hold an im-
portant meeting at 7:30 o'clock to-
night in the Union. The room number
will be posted on the'Union bulletin
board.

REGISTRA TION FO
ELECTIONS, TO 'BE
HT
RULING BY COUNCIL MAKES A(
NECESSARY FOR CAMUUS
t 'VOTING
COMMITTEE MUST KNOV
NOMINEES SA URDA
Students Named By Petition Harm
200 Signers Will Be Placed
On Ballot
Registration of all men and wom
students for the coming All-camp'
elections will be held from & to 4:
o'clock next Tuesday. Booth's w
be designated for the different depa
ments of the. University and membe
of the various classes will be prese
at each booth al. during the day. Su
registration is absolutely a prer
quisite to voting according to 'the ne
election rules adopted by the Stude
council this year.
Dishonesty Prevented
The registration was made one
the election rules in order to preve
any dishonesty in the voting proces
Students must register by classe
presenting their treasurer's recei
or fteir athletic book at the time
registration. In .case any student h
mislaid or lost his receipt and at:
letic book, he must provide himsE
with a duplicate receipt from'at
treasurer's office before the data e
registration.
Booths will be located on the car
pus as follows: All lit classes in fro
of the Library, all law classes in ti
Law building, all medical classes
the Medical building, combined clas
es in Waterman gymnasium, educe
tion classes ,in Tappan hall, and eng
neering 'classes at the Engipaeerir
arch. For those few persons who fir
it impossible to register on Tuesda
booths will be established at the 4.
ion for men, and in University ha
for the women, and will be open fro
8 to 4:15 'o'clock Wednesday. It
hoped by the committee that the
hours will give every interested sti
dent a chance to register for election
Time Limit Set
Nominations for either class r
campus offices to be elected qIn tI
coming All-campus elections must I
in the hands of the Student counc
election committee, Earl F. 'Boxel
'23L, chairman, by Saturday, April 2
at the Union, if the candidates are t
receive places on the election ballot
Nominations]by petition must be turi
ed in to ,the committee not later tha
Monday, April 24. Such petitions mu
have 200 signers wben nominating ft
campus offices.
Voting-lists will be made out fro]
the lists of registered voters and on]
students who are on the voting lis
will be-allowed to, vote. It is hope
by this means to avoid double votin
and other means of balloting fraud.
Detroit Orgarist
P lays. Tomorrok
L. L. Renwick, Detroit organist, w-
appeared in recital here some weel
ago, will appear again on the Twilig
organ series at 4:15 o'clock tomo
row afternoon' in Hill auditorium.
Mr. Renwick was born in Washtei
aw county. He was graduated fro'
the School of Music andlater becan
a member of its faculty, teaching o
gan and theory. From Ann Arbor 1
Europe where he spent several yea
in study and in concert work. Whi
abroad he particularly distinguish

himself at the American church i
Paris.
Upon his return to America he b(
came head of the organ department t
the School of Music, a position h
later resigned to engage in profe
sional work in Detroit. Since thz
time he has appeared as concert o
ganist in various cities throughot
the country. He has also been hear
on several May Festival programs.
LEGION MAN HERE TO .CONFER
WITH EX-SOLIERS ON CITA13
Ex-service men who still ha:
claims pending -may confer wi
Jamey A. Andrews, regional represe
tative of the American legion. I
will be in the office of the America
Red Cross, Cornwell building, fro
9 to 5 o'clock tomorrow.
ITHEI DAILY,

same time advised
ropriety of waiting
day before carrying
ich have been work-
; games may be ablej
at tonight's meeting
r the games is only

M
F -
Y

Watch for the "M's." Today Is "M",
Day.

HOOLS Whimsies, Out Tomorrow, Declared'
n and New JtNagazine In Effect ly Editors

801

pr+
at

Ildent
Poll-

ini will en-
. Burton at
ng a recep-,
in the ball
nd is under;
and women.
_____

Joyousness of tone and i
of appeal will characteriz
issue of Whimsies which
sale on the campus tomor
delay in printing. Accor
editors, it will be in effectt
azine, maintaining thef
standard of writing whic
set by former issues, but v
to be of lively interest to
son on the campus.
It is said that in this issi
of the finest literary pro
Michigan can produce. Ar
have been made to keep th
sale for several days in ti
University hall and at W
store.
Two Numbers of FJ
The fiction of the numb
in a short-story called "
Honor," by Lawrence H. {
and a sketch called "Jak
Stage Driver," by Darrell1
"A Point of Honor" is a;
Young Italian factory wor

uniyersality which this author has been publish-
e the April ing in the legitimate 'magazines. Jake
will go on Fritz is' a stage driver of the Old
row after a West, whose personality would draw
ding to the and hold a crowd anywhere, and
a new mag- whose stories keep the reader laugh-
same high ing all the way through.
h has been A one-act play called "Shades,"' by
vith an aim Helen Master, is a piece of work
every per- crammed with humor. There is no
scene and no setting, and the charac-
ue are some ters are both dead before the curtain
ducts that rises, but there is a deal of sage
rangements philosophy and plenty of mirth in the
is issue on dialogue. This play was contributed
he booth in to Whimsies in the old days when the
rahr's book magazine was "printed" on a type-
writer, and it scored such a hit with
ction the handfill of people who read it, that
er consists it is now being published for the first
A Point of time.
Conrad, '23, Essay yubllshed
e Fritz -- "Cafeteria-ism," an essay by Ruth
Dwight, '22. Lechlitner, '23, adds .to the joyful at-!
story of a mosphere of the magazine. It treats
ker, and is of a subject close to the hearts andl
of storie the stnmach, a efnnllAti +-l.

All class and campus organ-
izations must place their'lists of
nominees for office in the hands
of the Student council election
committee by Saturday, April
1 22. Failure to get nominations'
I In on time will result in for-
'feiture of space on the ballot.
This requirement is made neces-
sary, since the names should be
passed upon 'by the eligibility.
committee and be in the hands
of the printer one week before
election. Letters should be sent
to E. F. Boxell, '23L, chairman
I of the election committee, Mich-
igan Union.

ELECTION NOMINATIONS

ly at
and
r to-
g the
call-

There

Watch for the "M's."

Is

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