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April 18, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

In quenching
t irst it leaves
nothing to be
desired.

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.

Drink

Cl

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Delicious and
Refreshing

7-

The Coca-Cola Co.
Atlanta, Ga.

BUILDING IN ANN AROR
SHOWS MARKED INCREASE
A31IBERAY APARTMENTS, MASONIC]
TEMPLE, AND 3 NEW SCHOOLS ]
UNDER CONSTRUCTION
Three new public schools buildings
with an aggregate cost of $870,000, a
large, apartment house and Masonic
temple sare the chief features, of Ann
Arbor's present extensive building
program. Thirty-one residences and
60 small structures are now under{
construction.t
Exterior work on the three new
school buildings will be completed
during the, next few weeks. Each
building, though of distinctive archi-
tectural design, will be two stories in
height and made of brick and con-
crete. The new structures will re-
place the old Mack, Jones and Tappan
schools. Mdck school ; is located in
Miller avenue at the head of 7th street,
Jones is immediately back of the pres-
ent school on South Division and the
Tappan out South University ave-
nue. The buildings will.be ready for
occupation Sept. 1.
The Amberay apartments on East
University near the Engineering build-
ing will be completed about May 1.
The building, which is built of yellow
brick, is three stories'*high and con-
tains 21 apartments of five and six
rooms each.
The new Masonic temple on South
Fourth street will be completely with-
in the next six months, according to
R. A. Cole, the contractor.
Eighty-three building permits have
been granted as compared to the fifty-
nine given out at this time last year,
according. to the City Engineer. The
majority are in the southeast section
of the city.

CHIMES CONTEST
PROVES SUCCESS
"The Chimes short story contest
was a complete success," said F.
M. Smith, '22, editor, yesterday.
"The forty-seven stories received
have been sent to James Oliver Cur-
wood, who will judge them first. He]
willi return them to the Chimes and
they will be forwarded to Harold
Titus.".
The .quality of the stories submit-
ted were superior to any other con-
test recently held, in the opinion of
those in charge. The large number
of stories turned in in the last few
days that the contest was open changed
the contest from an apparent failure
to an unqualified success.
The Chimes contest was begun sev-
eral months ago in competition for
$100 in prizes. The money has been
contributed by Mr. C. W. Graham and
is to be, distributed in amounts of
$50, $25, $15, and $10. The success
of the contest this year will insure it
as an annual affair.
"RIDER for PENS."-Adv.

Wis inelegant
SFa Prof. taught a course in Whisker
Craps and their Removal, he'd probably
call them Face Flora.
Is there an easier way to remove them-
the whiskers, not the profs.?
Razor edges were never keener than they
are today. Then why do some shaves still
make the tears come? Especially tender
upper lips and chin corners?
Here is plain reasoning: Hairs can't pull if
they're properly softened by the right lather. Any
lather won't do. You know that. Williams' Shav-
ing Cream softens the toughest bristle. Its un-
usually heavy lather
softens the beard down to
its very base. Few soaps
can do that.

Face Flora.

Wl

Harvard Graduate
Schoolof Business
A two-year course in business, open
to college graduates, leading to the
degree of Mastcr of Business Admin-
istration.
The School aims to give its students
a basis of facts and principles which
the beginner who is looking forward to
executive work cannot readily obtain
in his early business experience.
The case method of the School pros
vides trainiug in analyzing actual busi-
ness problems.1
The various courses are correlated in
the following study groups: Account-
iig, Banking, Business Statistics, For-
eign Trade, Industrial Management,
Lumbering, Marketlig, Transporta-
tion. .
Registration for 19Q2-23 is limited.
For further inforialion and formal
application blanks, write to

[ ~ q ' dP.

1 _0

Try it-just once-and
you will never be with-
out Williams' Shaving
Cream near your razor.
x/

Y
!!!2 j

i

Starting SUNDAY

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pppl--- 1-11. ,;".--.N-7 '.

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Harvard

' Dean W. B. Donham, University 22
Graduate School of Business Administration
Cambridge, Massachusetts

u

┬░HOUSANDS of smokers
give the verdict to you-

have proved it-and now

X Of all the other tobaccos NATURE has produced
-none can approach the finest varieties of pure Turkish
)r cigarettes-
None has the delicious FLAVOR of the finest Turkish--
None gives the. ENJOYMENT of the finest Turkish-
None will SATISFY you as will the finest Turkish-
None but the highest grade and personally selected
'urkish 'tobaccos is used in MURAD.

MUme&D

To enjoy 00%o pure
Turkish at its VERY
BEST-to reach the
PEAK of Cigarette
Quality-you have but
to smoke MURAD-
Try MURAD to-
day and
"Judge for
Yourself-!"

THE UNIVERSITY'S
COMMON HEAL''TH
Heamt~l for Health's Sake
Health of itself makes life a perpet-
ual joy. oNthing daunts, nothing over-
awes, nothing discourages, and noth-
ing overpowers the man and woman
possessed of health. Health means
not only vigor and energy of body but
also clarity and strength of mind; pur-
ity and beauty of soul. The healthy
person dominates life, instead of al-c
lowing life to dominate him. To him
the body is one harmonious whole. He
is a unit, a bein'g, a man; complete,
vigorous, perfect. To such a man
work is a joy. Hesregards obstacles
as but opportunities for testing his
strength. He hardly knows what
weariness is. He never experiences
exhapstion. Health applies the cour-
age, the aggressiveness of a life. With
out health one is a bankrupt regardless
of what his financial condition may be.
He becomes a cipher in .the world of
real men and women.
Danger in Overtaxing
We are all more or less familiar
with the strict rules of banks in re-
gard to individual credit. We do not
expect to be permitted to overdraw our
accounts. But the majority of us ex-
pect more liberal treatment with our
drafts on the bank of Health. Over-
drafts, promises to pay, and notes are
given with a prodigal spirit, and we
growl mightily if called to account
by Motheir Nature for extravagance.
Everyone begins life with a certain
?amount. of capital in the way of health
and resistance to disease. This cap-
ital varies in different individuals, ac-
cording to the physique inherited from
parents and the environment provided.
We start life as men and women with
this variable amount of capital'to our
credit.
When, it is fully expended, we are
through. Every dissipation and illness,
which means the expenditure of phys-
cal energy, withdraw just so much
from the health account. Every illness
leaves an imprint upon the system,
and even though no decided change
is felt by the individual, there is in-
variably some decrease of the normal
resistance.
Expend your energies with discre-
tion and keep the balance of your
health accounts as large as possible.-
Michigan State Board of Health.
Surawski Studies Here..
Dr. Jan Surawski, of the hospital
department, ministry of public health,
Warsaw. Poland arrived last week at]
Ann Arbor,; and is going to spend the
month of April at the University Hos-
pital, studying administrative methods
in use there. Dr. Surawski is making
a tour of America, studying hospital
administration on a Rockefeller Foun-
dation fellowship.
"RIDER for PENS."-Adv.

BO'

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THE FEATURE PICTURE

4

BESS I E LOVE

OF THUE MICHIIGAN UNION
Tuesday and Wednesday, A pril
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20'c

RGyIFZ(iy3.

ALSO FIRST SHOWING IN ANN ARBOR OF
i/
____ p sh'ots
ADMISSION, 25 CENTS
FRIDAY-SATURDAY, May 4-5
The Mimes Repertoire Company in
"TE1:5 thCH A~iR
A MOST COMPLETE DRAMATIC PRODUCTION
MORE THRILLING THAN "THE BAT"
NOTE-Make your reservations nolv by nail, as seating capacity
is limited to five hundred. All seats reserved. Price $1.00
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SPECIAL

DANCE KWaterman

Gymna i

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KENNEDY'S TEN-PIECE ORCHESTRA

I

FRIDAY, APRIL 21st, 9 to 1

I

BIll $1,25 PER COUPLE

I

d SLATER'

BENEFIT OF LEAG

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