100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 05, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

w ..

."- wewwy -

I

LL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
wery morning except Monday during the University
oard in Control of StudentPublications.
WBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rauted Press is rxclusive1l' entitled to the 1541e i*r
all news dispatches credited to it or not otbhr e
paper and theelocal newS pubished t sereix.-
tho postoet ftA..-. A Uor tcbla~At, s scMu E
a by carrier or bail, $3.5e.
nn Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street,
sincas, (; Editrial, 2414.
tions not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signa-
aily to appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
events will be published in The Daily at the discre-
tor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office. Unsigned
will receive no consideration. Nomanuscript will
less the writer incloses postage.
does not necessarily endorse the sentiments expressed
ications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
.DITOR............BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
....Joseph A. Bernstein
.. . P. _ovejoy,. Jr.
lditor...........................J. B. young

The board in all probability has already taken
these things into consideration, but a warning sug-
gestion now and then may not go amiss. The fact
is that Michigan's sports are bound to increase rap-
idly in number and scope within the next few
years, and the possibilities of the future ought to be
given due consideration. We should build for ten
or twenty years from now, not just for the pres-
ent. Tereby trouble, at present arising from a lack
of proper facilities, will be avoided.

BOOKS, STATIONERY, BRIEF CASES, FELT GOODS
LEATHER GOODS, BOSTON BACS, MEMORY BOOKS
At Greatly Reduced Prices
AT M'

b

ns
'wson
mnbrecht
ike

G. P. Overton
M. B. Stahl
Paul Watzel,

rman..................Ie. Armstrong Ke

er E. R. Meiss

Magazine Editor..............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
gC Editor...........................George . Sloan
.itor..-«."... ....... ..... ......Sidney B. Coates
g Edito...«..... .....................George Reinel
* Editor...............................Elizabeth Vickery
Editor..................................-. R. Meiss
P Assistants
ice Berman Dorothy G. Geltz Robert M. Loeb
R. Betron H. B. Grundy J. E. Mack
D. Briscoe Winona A. Hibbard Kathrine Montgomery
C Butler Harry D. Hoey R. C. Moriarty
Byars Agnes Holmquist J F. Pontius
C Carke H. g. Howlett Lillian Scher
yC. Clark Marion Kerr ' R. B. Tarr
rn J. Coughlin M. A. Klaver Virginia Tryon
Donahue Marion Koch
BUSINESS STAFFa
Telephone 960
ESS MANAGER.............VERNON F. HILLERY
ing.....................................Albert J. Parker
ing..............................John J. Hamel, Jr.
ion ...........................Nathan W. Robertson
V...................................... .Waler K. Scherer
ion.....................................Herold C, Hunt
Assistants
Cooler David Park D. C. Maltby
eaumont Parks .J.A.Dryer .rHarvey Reed
ur.xane T.-H.'Wolfe George Rockwood
s:Pretifss Paul Blum E. D. Armantrout
in Goldring Stanley Monroe Edward Conlin
William Graulich Lawrence Favrot
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5, 1922
Night Editor-M. B. STAHL
Assistants=R. B. Tarr
J, D. Briscoe
ERE PASSING ON
en the class of 192; returns from spring re-
s members will have but six short weeks of
life left before them, - a last grasp upon
t attendance at Michigan means, '- the last
ours of "college days"
in these short few weeks are embodied many
chigan's most cherished traditions, designed
ble seniors to take one last deep draught from
imming cup of University spirit and loyalty
they pass on into the "wide, wide world".
carrying of class canes and the wearing of
-nd gowns are among these final rites. But
s the most impressive of all is the tradition
"Senior sings", conducted just before night-
i the steps of the campus library. This not
creates a sense of union and comradeship
- the members of the graduating class, but
the. entire throng which gathers around to
:he gowned chorus, with an inspiration
only song can effect.
hinking things over during the coming yaca-
ach senior owes it to himself to resolve that
rhout the'short remainder of his college days
I live life to the full, joining in every activ-
I observing every .tradition, so that in retro-
he last six weeks will not seem like an anti-
, but rather stand out as a fitting close for
>st wonderful period of his life, - his years
:higan.- '
ILDING FOR FUTURE ATHLETES
i that the Board in Control of Athletics has
arranged to select an architect to design the
ed field house on Ferry field, the problem
>resents itself of making ample provision for
Michigan's minor sports activities.
i sports as hockey, wrestling and boxing have
een in need of homes of their own. Hockey,
ample, is at' present without any practice
since the sale of the coliseui; which even
t was a poor substitute for a University
Wrestling and boxing have each but one
room in the gymnasium where practice is
ractice which is hampered because of a lack
n and adequate equipment.
field house probably will be erected soon a
tee already having been appointed to super-
- drawing up of final plans. In those plans
be included quarters for alL of the minor
for they are undeniably of sufficient impor-
> warrant the board giving them individual
arters. The building should be large enough
ent any overcrowding, as is at present the
th most of our training quarters. Lockers
ssing rooms should be set aside for the mem-
the hockey team, while a rink could prob-,

built in close proximity to the field house.
rooms might be given over to wrestling and
unless it is planned to continue these sports
gymnasium, and space certainly should be

SNICKERING AT PROHIBITION
' Whether prohibition is right or wrong,. the fact
remains that the eighteenth amendment is a law.
Though prohibition jokes have flourished for some
time, they now are becoming passe. They hre
losing their "kick"; even the "wet" public is sick
of them..
The effect of the past country-wide tolerance and
positive praise for the evaders of the prohibition
law, through humor columns and the like, must be
a bad one. The poor man sees his rich neighbor
calmly "making his/ own", and not only avoiding
punishment, but actually being condoned as clever
by publications everywhere. Witless wits, and
humor ediors who have run dry, fall back upon the
prohibition joke, and thereby display the same at-
titude toward the law-breaker as the schoolboy does
toward a truant companion who has escaped pun-
ishment.
Whether the eighteenth amendment is right or
wrong has nothing to do with the present case. It
is law, and should be respected as such by those who
help to mold public opinion. As long as we giggle
and snicker at one law and wink at its violators, we
may as well giggle and snicker at all of them, and
try to enliven our comic sections by writing par-
odies on the Constitution and "The Star Spangled
Banner".
IN HONOR OF "THE CHIEF"
The raising of funds for the purchase and pre,
sentation to the Michigan Union of a recent por-
trait of Prof. Robert M. Wenley of the philosophy
department has been undertaken by the Detroit
Alumni club, contributions to be solicited from fac-
ulty members and students as well as from the
alumni. The plan is to permit everyone who has
come into contact with Professor Wenley, during
the latter's stay of twenty-five years at the Univer-
sity, to help in the enterprise. The purchase of the
portrait is regarded as being especially appropriate
because of Professor Wenley's aid in making possi-
ble the new Union, and as a tribute to his contin-
ued success in the teacher's chair.
It is inconceivable that a project of this sort
should fail for want of funds, and we feel sure that
the entire campus will respond heartily to the call
of the Detroit alumni. Certainly the portrait, when
hung in the Union, will be regarded in the eyes. of
students, faculty, and alumni, as a fitting tribute
to the great work which Professor Wenley has
done, in furthering the best interests of the Unb
'versity as well as in building up his own depart
ment.
Now that "Babe" Ruth has announced his inten-
tion of beating his last year's record, the baseball
season is ready to start.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
An. Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(UasiDarn Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars -6Moo
a. m., 7;so a. z. : a. m., 9:0o a. zn. and
hourly to 9:c5 ;. m.
jacksrn Exprcp cars lo{cal stops of Aan
lkrbsr), 5:47 u. i . kndco 'ry two hours to
Local Cars Fast c orfu$--s ~a.ar.. $ :41 a.
?.n. ri] n d ry tT3Yt. lf'TY's tx *-'A) p.it, .. FiiL
Ai :2J pfilhit. iJ ::+ F'""5. ' ;4o p i. 2LZA;.
a al 4 a
Tot llalia'a;ci'angrat Ypsiia't
;To :.: a arn d aia~ioo-IUrnited aa
To Ja kso ad Lensing - Limited; 4

AN NUAL B OO{K SALE

(BOTH STORES)

I

REMOVE THE DANGER
Step into either of our offices and look over our
Safety Deposit Vault Equipment
You will feel at ease knowing your valuables are
safely deposited in your individual box behind
those massive doors
THE COST IS NOMINAL
FARMERS & MECHANICS BANK
101-105 South Main Street. $30 South State Street
(Nickels Arcade)

1922
S

APRIL
M T W

1922
T F S
1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 19 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30
HATS - SPRING - HATS
Reblocked at greatly reduced prices.
Turned inside out, with all new. trim.
mings they are as good -as new. High
class work only.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS
SCHEDU E E FCTIVEOCT.'o 0, 1921
Read Down C entral Standard Time
. t F.M. P.M. A&PM
Daily Daily Daily Daily
7:30 x:3o Lv... Adrian ...Ar. 7.oo 12:45
: 2:"5Tecuel .6:25 12:10
3:s5 2:251....... ("mon.......6:0~~5'r.
Q: '15 3:5 Sa1r .......5:1 5 11:00
0-4, a:d" sr. AnuA Arbor Lv. L o3
A.1. PM.P. . A
Read Up

i
NcR

/ y

Her Correspondence
is of vital importance and she must
therefore have suitable stationery,
especially for the Easter season. We
carry a full line of the highest grade
linen papers in all tints in such well
known-lines as Crane's and Hurd's.
Also handsomely monogramed..at
moderate prices. We make a spe-
ciality of engraving and embossing.

P.M.
3 *30
4 : o_
5:45
P.M.

*-.-. Adrian ...Ar.
...Tecumseh ....,
.Clinton ....
. Salin......
Ar. Ann Arbor Lv.

q:oo
8:25
P.M

Vacation starts Friday. Have you
road ticket in your pocket?

a little rail-

'irie Telesope

"-A Young Man's Fancy'
The buds are on the evergreen,
The ostrich builds her nest,
Enchanting spring doth beckon me
To throw away my vest.
I hear the wild oof-goofle bird
A-calling for his mate,
Instilled in me are clever thoughts
And so I seek a date.

MIN
SNr
IM
wm
JimI
mu8
N
to.
NSN
N
Sl6N
nIUN
Mill
SN
UN
Ilm
Im
IllS
Imli
Hai
"IN
16Ns
tSN
IU"l
Ur
IWN
N
Nll
aEN
tllN
N
RN1
ON
Un
IN
'IM!
Of
Eol
RUIN
R
N
"U
uii
m
Ill
IN!l
urns
Rum
nmu
aSIN
I-
fillS
N
n
IU .IIMN

1A

1 Auditorium,

- - May17, 18,19,20

SFEAST OF GOOD MUSIC

EIE .MAY FESTIVAL

Six

Concerts

- ----------

READ THIS

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Will I call on some clever girl
And argue over tea?
Oh no! The wild oof-goofle bird
Ne'er had a thing on me.
The Faculty Scores
Yesterday as we were walking along the campus
an incident occurred which exploded the theory
that college professors have no sense of humor. It
was this way.
A recalcitrant German book (whose rebellious
spirit we have never been able to subdue) sud-
denly slipped out unnoticed from under our arm
onto the swiftly, passing ground.
A minute later the book was handed Back to us
by a professor, who made the theory-breaking re-
mark, "I think you've forgotten your German. If
you desire to drop-the language, you really have to
see the dean."
A One-Sided Affair
If a song foufght a coin, from the dope we have,
The latter would be out of luck;
For when the song made a hit, as it usually does,
The dope says the coin would be struck.
Today's Prize
No, Oswald, South Bend is not an exercise, and
Cellu-loid is no relation at all to Harold.
Famous Closing Lines
"This powder is "Rough on Rats'," said the flap-
per as she tried in vain to shake the talc from her
hair-puffers. ERM.

A large number of the greatest artists from the Metropolitan Opera
Company, the Chicago Opera Association and other musical celebrities will
participate in brilliant programs interspersed with selections by the Chicago
Symphony Orchestra, 'The University Ohoral Union, and a Children's Cho-
rus. "LA VITA NUOVA" (The New Life) by Wolf-Ferrari, words
by the great Dante, whose six-hundredth anniversary it commemorates, will
be sung. Wagner's "TANNHAUSER" will be offered in English, Fred-
erick Stock's "RHAPSODY" will be given, and among other numbers the
children will sing Busch's "SONG OF SPRING."
The list of soloists includes: Frieda Hempel and Florence Easton, so-
pranos; Mario Chamlee, Tenor; and Carl Schlegel and Reinald Werren-
rath, baritones, arc among the greatest stars-of the Metropolitan Opera Com-
pany. Cyrena VanGordon, contralto, and Riccardo Martin, tenor of the
Chicago Opera Association; Adele Parkhurst, soprano; Kathryn Moisle, con-
tralto; Rollin Pease, bass, are among America's greatest concert stars. Wil-
liam Bachaus, one of the leading piano virtuosos. Frederick Stock, will con-
duct all of the concerts except the NEW LIFE which will be conducted by
Acting Conductor, Earl V. Moore, and the Children's Chorus, which will
be under- the baton of George Oscar Bowen.

F%0%0%0

A limited number of course tickets are still available at $7.00, $6.00,
$5.00, $4.50 each (if Pre-Festival coupon is returned deduct $3.00) at the
office of the University School of Music. CHARLES A. SINK, Secretary.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan