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April 04, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

td. youth. Otherwise older people will
is simple examinations as creditably as
igsters ; Whereas the same youtngsters
Begin to pass a test designed for adults.
bably lies the explanation 4Qf some of the
results and contrasts exhibited in recent

ely entitled t. the *use hW
.eted to it or not othemwle
news published tkerein.
Arbon, WYigaa. a.toecoad
5, Maynard street.
9414.
words, if signed, the signs-
but as an evidence of faith,
in The Daily at the -discre-
:o The Daily office. Unsigned
sration, N. manuscript will
postage.
orse the sentiments expressed

ITOR.k.......... BR4WSTFR P. CAMPBELI
..,...Joseph A. Bernstein
............. .Z. P. L~ovejoy, Jr.
.tr ...... ...... .. .......J. B. Young
me G. P. Overton
awson Md. B. Stahl
Ambrechit Paul Watzel
-Pike
;hairman............... ....IL. Armstrong Kern
hdorfer E. R. Meiss
drew#
Editor............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
........George E. Sloan
... ........ ....4..Sidney B. Coates
~.George Reindel
.......... .. ...............Elizabeth Vickery
..... E. R. Meiss
/Assistants
- Dorothy G. Geltz Robert M. Loeb
H. B. Grundy J.JE. Mack
Winona A. Hibbard Kathrine Montgomery
Harry D. Hoey R. C. Moriarty
Agnes Holmquist' J F. Pontius
H. E. Howlett Lillian Scher
Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
in M. A. Klaver Virginia Tryon
Marion Koch
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
.GR........VIERNON F. HILLE]RY
....................Albert J. Parker
............. .John J. Hiamel, Jr.
~.Nathan W. Robertson
......... ..al~er K.Scherer
................Herold C. Hunt

examinations.
Educational tests are now an established f eature
of education in the primary grades. At Michigan
the much talked of probation tests have been amply
justified by their -results, even though these are not
all that might be desired. While they have been
found quite consistently to confirm instructors' diag-
noses of delinquent scholars, they carry conviction
otherwise wanting to an indignant or bewildered
probationer. Like many other good things, the test:
could be made much more useful if it were possi-
ble to accord troubled students more~ thorough in-
dividual inquiry and advice.
Such ideal service, however, can be achieved only
by enlargement of the' staff of examiners suffi-
ciently to 'extend individual consultations to all stu-
dents. The Deily would recommend that the ens
tire sophomore class, should be so "experted" .-
though without compulsion - in the course of
each college year. With appropriate entrance ex-
aminations to determine doubtful cases, incoming
freshmen can 'be steered sufficiently intortight paths
by a corps of senior advisors, as is now done. The
main need of the freshmen, beyond rudimentary
curricula suggestions, is simply to be exposed to
University standards and ideals -- plus certain Sig
nificant accessories for hardy specimens.
Eery student who escapes faculty probation,
however, at some time in his sophomore year should
hav'e the 'benefit of a. personal examination or test
for aptitude and ability, and prof essional advice- ir
planning his subsequent course of study. Both the
students and the reputation of the University - not,
to mention the outside business and pro fessional
world- would profit greatly in s'ubsequent years
through such scientific inquiry and counsel as an~
intergral part of higher education.
Signs. of the times: Joe Parker will soon open a
new cafe, where music for dancing will be furnished
by a four-piece orchestra in the evenings and a vic-
trola in the afternoons. -And the old-time table
tops, with' their ornate carvings, will no doubt look
down upon the- new era of things with a sense 'of
wonder and irreparable loss..
Darkness before the- dawn a dateless week-
end - the last lap - then Friday and vacation!1
May charity reign in pedagcdgical hearts and-spare
us the vacation assignment !
'Tis an ill wind that blows nobody, good. The
ice storm at least provided barriers' of lim~bs. to keep
us -off the campus lawns.
Senior, have you ordered that cane?

C'
5t
1-
1-
r
It
ri

-. BOOKS, STATI
LEATHER GOO
At Greal
ANNL
DETROIT UNITED, LINES
Ans.Arbor and Jackson
TI"XETABLE
(FEastrn Standard Time)
Detroit Limnited and Expre"s Cars - 6:zo
a. mn., 7:0o0S.im,, S:eo a. im., 9:00 a. u. and
hourly to . .
Jackson Express. Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:47 A. m." and every. two hours to.
1 Cars EZat Bomd-s:ss am., y:o0 a.
mn. and every two hours to ,:oo p. mn., x;.oo
p. m To Ypsilaatl only-u :;4op. as., s .:25
a. m1., z:x5 a. n.
To Salia. change at YpsilaatL.
Local Cars West ound--7:1.5 a. , 4
To. Jako n n.aso-Liie as
qo :4con1a:41,, a. '7 247, 4:4cars
To Jackson and Lanring - 'imitted: # :s;'
1922 APRIL 1922'
S MW T W T F S
1
2 3. 4 8 7. 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 16
18 17 18 19 20 21 22
23. 24 26 26 27" 28 29
30
HATS - SPRING -'HATS
Reblocked at greatly reduced 'prices.
Turned inside out, wlth all newtim
mings they are as good as new. High
class work only.
FACTORY HAl' SORE
817 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792,

7IONERY, BRIEF CA
3DS, BOSTON BAG

tly lReduced Prices,
AT
RAHIAM'S
UAL BOOK' SALE
(BOTH STORES)

M

I

Phone 294-F2
Branch,,Store, 715'N. University, Ave.

Phone 294-Fl
320 E. Liberty St.

I

Elie

Assistants
David Park
irks A'.Dryer
iPaul iBlum
Stanley Monroe
William Graulich

-D. C. Maltby.
Harvey Reed'
George Rockwood
E. D. Armantrout
E~dward Conlini
L~awrence iVavrot

'UESDAY, -APRIL 4, 1922
Eldtor-EDW. 'F. LAMBRECHT
tants---A. D. Clarkc
M. H." Pryor
1iE -NEXT CONVOCATION
last Friday~ morning undoubtedly
e success, and the occasion was made
aorable. by reason - of the -pe'rsonality
jr. Vincent; certainly noi wiser choice
n made for a speaker to lead off the
ew convocation program. In the fu-
University gatherings as the one last
rove most valuable;,'as being 'a means
en of Dr. Vincent's, calibre before
and possibly'- by serving in~ some-
.city of . a pop-off valve, for~ emer-
en it appears advisable 'toL 'gather
ether for a.. discussion of some. local'
hoped that, in the future, however,
tak'en to reserve convocations pri-
idents and' faculty. As, the assem-
pore popular, it 'is 'possible- that
gill -* attend in increasing' numbers.
come, but the Stuidents should get
seats. . One, possib'le means of ar-
is might be to seat the undergradu-
Space on the first floor :front, for
tbe held for seniors until five min-
iconvocation hour,. similar reser-
made for juniors, also on the first
underclassmen in the first balcony.
efore the meeting began, the- doors
vnopen to everyone, and ou5atsiders
-s could occupy the remaining seats
d could-; be allowed' t(' fill the' sec-
e entirely possible, and surely would.
work out some kind of seating ar-
use ' at the next 'all-University' con-
TESTS FOR STUDENTS
ion has been drawn to intelligence
juently'-of lateby instances in which
were produced, of a character cal-
w into quiestion the -'eliability " of
:h extraordinalry exahples, 'taken-
he' fact that the spectacle of col-
and - professors taking intelliglence
oke jocularity anyway, have caused
iusement and disparagement at the
ry serviceable institution.
ists are so called for want of a bet-
icational tests is a term almost
ince they were designed -primarily
rent mental ability of'-school chil-
flame which might be proposed as
nearly the nature of the tests, is
,bilityj tests. And as Long as ,youth~s
Tets ,fiting themselves by .elective
re ..occupations,,such tests can be
I to advanitage.-- This of course ap,.
ege students, and for that -matter
!'wopmaystllbe undetermined asi
n do best and how. to 'g' about it.

thie Telescop e

i

I

I

1"

Vision
When Galahad :first saw the Holy Grail
He was considerably moved. with its signifi-
cance.
Just so the other day a' vision burst
Upon my iorbs, one so unusual,
That it left me amazed, awed, thunderstruck,
And at the same time thrilled
With a' renewed faith in modern youth.
It was a sight that once I saw
But had despaired of seeing any more. m
To expect my readers -to believe me
Is almost more than I can ask, and' yetr.
This incredulous revelation is a truth
Which if but one or two 'accept
I'll feel my duty done.-
The other day on walking throutgh Ain Ar-
bor
I actually saw, with my own eyes- both of
them,
(And without 'th'e aid of intoxicating stimu-
lants)-
A young' high school girl'
With her hair, genuine unblondined tresses,
Hanging braided. down her back.
-Chalk up a nice big one for mother !

#J~rantec of perfection.
Absolutely crumnbleproof,
smooth and perfectly graded.'
7 DEGREES
zB soft &~ black H med. had
'B soft 2H hard
F 'fim, 41-{extra arda
SHB mnedium~x-for general use
19e per Babe of I2 leads
/ $1.50,per dozen tubes
.Ifyourdealercanotrnpplyyouwriteu. a
*Amnericans Lead Pencil Co.-
215 Fifth Abe., Dept. DIIew York
Aktao4qnwVENUJS EVER2POINTED PENCILSmi
,Wo::rth M
'The Opentrii
4 the First.,, A
Tour' by the
Something
any entertair
fore given b
-not a band b(
spect. you j
coming.
With the barn
-ttte and s
acts.
For the oen
tickets are-Fifl
at Graham's,
*You'll fid it

A IERDEILN
Mlack and Vrokrn
--a Nettleton Shoe

for Nettleton Men's'Sshoes-lire woru's

aw

W ahr

sShoe Stoi

C.

108. South. Main Street

f~hile

In style, 'in fit and in length of-
life Nettletons are truly"Shoes of -
W'o rth "
We would ' take pleasure in-
showing you how Nettletons differ,
from less carefully made shoes.

Aig Concert of
inu'al Concert
e Varsity Band

.. ,

different

from,

iment ever be-
l'-the band, and
Dunce in any re-
have, a surprise

A Novel Novelette-
The brewer stood' in his 'brewery. 'Trouble wasl
brewing. (Editor's 'Note.-"Trouble". was not his
son or- an- employe, but is an -abstract-noun the su-
perlative of which is "murder" or "expulsion from
school".) Anyhow, trouble was-'brewing.
But the brewer had a partner, the most even-temn-
pered manr in town -- always mad. This'partner
had only one hobby, and that was a specifl vat of
amber beer 'which he greatly admired.
On the day of our story he' was pottering around
' this favorite vat. He gazed at it for a. long time,
and then leaning over the' side of the vat, tried to
get a taste of the liquid. But alas, balance and cor-
Ipulency do not travel together, andf before he knew
it, the poor man tumbled headlong into his beer.
-The brewer who had long been vexed at his part-
ner's- peculiarities, was greatly amused by the oc-
currence, and after his partner had- managed to
climb out of the vat he said mercilessly, "It serves
you right.- You've had a terrible grouch on all aft-
'ernoon."
"That's a -slanderous' lie !" excclaimed the coypu-
lent' partner -as; he rinsed the -beer fromi~ his 'clothes.
"On the contrary, I've been utri the best of spirit:"
- Flnhis.
Fa-mo us Closing' Lines
"A man cannot serve two- masters at once," said
the 'Mormon a~s he fed arsenic to his second wife.
ERM.

d will be a quar-
:veral specialty

ing concert the
Iy cents. On sale
Slater', Wars

I'

I I

worth while.

. 11

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