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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 02, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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every morning except 'Monday during the jniVeritY
Board in Control of Student Publications.
IMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ciated Press is exclusively entitled to the use fer
of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
is paper and the local sews published thaereis
t the postoffize at~Anau Arbor. Michigan, as aeccad'
on by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Business, 96o; FEditorial, 24=4.
ations not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signa-
sarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
Severt will be published in The Daily at the discre-
litor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office. Unsigned
s will receive no consideration. e manuscript will
nless the writer incloses postage.
does not necessarily endorse the sentiments expressed
inications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
EDITOR...........BREWSTER P. CAMPBLL
........Joseph A. Bernstein
. .....................E. P. Lovejo , Jr.
yEditor...........................J. B. Young
,Adams G. P. Overton
P. Dawson .. B.BStahl
rd Ls brech , Paul Watiel
kc McPike
rd Chairman.................L. Armstrong Kern
ird-
Hershdorfer E.-R. Meiss
Andrews
zinc Editor............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
itor..............................George B. Sloane
..........Sidney B. Coates
..............................George Reindel
or...........................Flizabeth Vickery
r.......................... R. Meiss
Assistants
rman Dorothy G. Geltz Robert M. Loeb
:trop H. B. Grundy J. E. Mack
scoe Winona A. Hibbard KathrineMontgomery
Harry D. Hoey R. C. Moriarty
s Agnes Holmquist J.F. Pontius
H. E. Howlett Lillian Scher
lark Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
oughlin M. A. Klaver Virginia Tryon
hue Marion Koch
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
AANAGf..............VERNON F. HILLERY
.........Albert J. Parker
......JohnJ. Hamei, Jr.
, -- - . Nathan W.-Robertson
-........Walter K. Scherer
......................Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
David Park D. C. Maltby
)it Parks J.A. Dryer Harvey Reed
ne T. H. Wolfe George Rockwood
ntiss Paul Blum F,. D. Armantrout
dring Stanley Monroe Edward Conlin
William Graulich Lawrence Favrot

says, "can stand investigating."
As long as human beings are human, of course.
and newspapers are newspapers, the unusual will
be played up at the expense of the usual. This is
to be expected, even while it is to be deprecated.
But while the rational investigator remains to dis-
count journalistic "colour", and interpret the col-
lege as it really is, all' the hokum in the world can-
not do much real harm. It is enough that' colleges
can stand investigation.

BOOKS, STATIONERY, E
LEATHER GOODS, BOST

I At Greatly Reduced Prkc
I AT
G.R A H A M'S
ANNUAL BOOK SALE
(BOTH STORES)

EDUCATING VIA THE ETHER
Science once agin has come to the aid of educa-
tion. By the .means of the radiophone on the De-
troit} News building, a series of five University
Extension lectures will be sent out, one each week,
over the wide radius covered by the News sending
apparatus Public health, public education, and late
developments in the sciences will be the subjects
ttouched upon by members of . the Michigan faculty
who Will give the talks. The heaviest stress will be
placed on the health lectures, which are in line with
the campaign now under way to disseminate fun-
damental points of pudlic hygiene to people through-
out the state.
The plan is' worthy of the trial. Perhaps it may
prove a very pracicable means of giving the advan-
prove a very practicable means of giving the advan~-
not able to take the regular work at Ann Arbor, and
who have not as yet been interested in the Univer-
sity Extension service. The plan recommends itself
because of the fact that these lectures will circu-
late broadcast' over much of the United States, and
because radiophones are plentiful enough to enable
all who are interested to hear the iiformation given.
The most probable drawback lies in the fact 'that
the average radiophone enthusiast is apt t ,be in-
terested in radio lectures only because they are sent
out by radio, not because they contain 'anything of
vital importance to him personally. He is playing
with wireless for the most part, and the transmit-
ting stations are taking advantage of his enthusi-
asnI to give themselves some very desirable adver-
tising. Furthermore, the presence of "static" and
and other forms of interference will doubtless de-
tract greatly from the effectiveness of the lectures.
Still, they may do a great deal of good, and may
ultimately have some effect in popularizing educa-
tion. The lecture plan of the University Exten-
sion service may be watched with much interest, for
what it may possibly lead to.in the future.
DEAN W. H. BUTTS.
The announcement that Assistant Dean William
Henry Butts, of the engineering college, has re-
tired, presents to Michigan the problem of finding
someone to fill the place of another very able mem-
ber of the University faculty. Dean Butts has been'
connected with affair here since i898. Graduated-
from the literary college in 1878, he has served for
forty-one years as a teacher, and during this time
for fourteen years as assistant dean.
Here on the campus, Dean Butts has earned for
himself a truly enviable reputation for "playing
square with the students" - and an ability to meet
the most irresponsible undergraduate with unbiased
fairness, is the sure mark of an able teacher and
man. "He has been a valuable men, and his loss
will be a serious blow to the departient," says
Dean Cooley. But the studeits will say even more
than this. Dean Butts will be missed by he under-
graduate engineers.
'die Telescope
Ice'
A Tragedy? Perhaps i is,
For nature's monarchs to be torn.
From.'cherished nurslings they have, borne
Through tender yguth to sturdiness.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
An, Arbor and Jackso,
TIME TABLE
(Haste'rn Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:oo
a. M., 7:00 a. m ., 8 :o a. m., g:oo a. m. and
hourly to 9 :s55V.n.
Jackson Expreu Cars (local stops of Ann
Aor), .!:47 a. *, and every two hours to
l Cars East Bound-5:5 a.m., 7:0e a.
m. and every two hours' to q:o p. m.. 11.0ia
p. is. To Ypslant, only--ii:4o p. .. 12:21
., f ., r?$ a. iM.
To'Salline, changr at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Wat Souad-7 : a. A. 3:40
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited ears:
9:4,10:47:an'.,'12:47,'.47,:4:47:
To Jackson and Lasing -- Limited: 8:47
i.,

-
"FOOTWEI
adid DI
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AR of QUALITY
STINCTION"

1922
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1922
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27 28 29

I. i~dwdA,

MATS - SPRING - HATS
Reblocked at greatly reduced prices.
Turned inside out, with all new trim-
wings they are as good as new. High
class work only.
FACTORY HAT STORE
. 617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS
SCHE DLE E FFCTIVE OCT. ro, 2g1
Read Dowan Central Standard Time
A.M. P.M. P.M. A&PM
Daily Daily Daily Daily
7:3. r:30 Lv.. Adrian ...Ar. 7.00 12:45
8:05 a:e5 .... Tecumsek ..., 6:25 12:10
8:25 2:25 ..... Clinton ......6:o5 II:5w
9:15 3:1 .. ....Saline......5:15 z1:oo
3. .4. Ar. Ann Arbor L.*
Read Up
9YTNlAV CANn. TOLTDAYS
P. MP. M.-
3:30 Lv... Adrian ...Ar. :oo
4:05.... Tecumseh 8:25
4:25 ..... Clinton 8:05
5:x5Saline . 7:15
5'45 Ar. Ann Arbor. Lv. 6:45
P.M. P.M
I OTHERS S AYj

N ARBOR

K'9-99 TAX

NOW35

Every P

SUNDAY, APRIL 2,

1922_

Night Editor-PAUL WATZEL
Assistants-H. A. Donahuet
M. H. Pryor
'SINK OR SWIM
vacation has been set as the time for- a
aign for funds to complete the Union
pool. Last year a drive towards the
fell far short of its goal partly because of
:onditions, but largely through a'"lack of
)n upon the part of the student body with
were conducting the drive. This must
1 again.
a needs a swimming pool With excellent
ant material present on the campus, Mich-
:nming 'team remains'an ineffective or-
because of a sad lack of any place to
Meanwhile the average student who en-
nge now and then can find no opportu-
ulge in an exercise which is unsurpassed
>und body developer.
g that the swimming pool is a necessity,
hing to do is to go out and raise the
it. Last year many alumni objected to
ption blanks as a useless bother, stating'
vould rather give a sum in cash than have
hanging over their- heads It might be,
:e this into consideration during the corn-
The fund can be swelled best by large
but the small subscriptions are also
f Michigan can get one dollar in cash,
y one of the thirty thousand or more
e drive will be more than a success
apaign this year' must succeed. An old
it, "Sink or swim": Every man on the
.st co-operate to see that the drive does
that next year the University may swim.
needs that pool.
COLLEGE MORALITY
humor magazines, strident, syncopated
ic, freakish modes in clothing, and gen-
directed at men who have "never been
e no indications that college men are mor-.
normal. On the contrary, morality
ege men is higher than in most groups of
riding size in any other pursuit, accord-
Rev. Warren F. Sheldon, secretary of the
Educational board. Mr. Sheldon made
'ation, and his report read that he was
by the high standlard of morals".
ldon is to be congratulated. The jour-
rgy which has flooded the press of the
th feature stories of college freaks and
o impression on his good sense. He has
:onsideration not only the fact that pub-
in educational institutions has brought
i into a sharper relief than young men
es, but also the fact that "single men in
>n't grow into plaster saints". The mis-

I

R

A Tragedy, we say ; but know -
As diamond branches droop beneath
Their jewel-studded silver sheath -
That we can-scarce conceive it so.

SCORE ONE FOR THE U. OF N.
(Detroit News)
There is ample evidence that the
Rhodes scholars from the UAited
States very creditably hold their own
at Orford university. Although they
compete there with students from
ma/ny lands, all of whom have been
chosen because of excellent records in
universities in their own lands, our
American students have always
brought honor to the universities and
colleges from which they were select-
ed.
The University of Michigan's repre-
selitative for 191$, Ralph W. Carson
has established a record at Oxford un-
iversity which more than justifies the
pride which our state school's stu-
dents and alumnl"take in her. Mr.
Carson has made his way to the pres-
idency of the Oxford International As-
sembly, as well as to that of the Ox-
ford Union.
The winning of either of these dis-
tinctions would have been an achieve-
ment significant enough; the cautr-
ing of both of them is evidence of eX-
ceptional merit. The presidency of
the Oxford Union implies that the in-
cumbent is the carefully selected can-
didate from a group of students from
many lands, every one of whom is at
Oxford because of specialhmerit. It
is by no 'means an empty honor.
Mr. Carson's achievement at Oxford
reflects credit not only on himself;
his Alma Mater shares in the distinc-
tions he has won. He has furnished
evidence that the American college
educates for leadership.
TRAINING, HIGH AND LOW
(Ohio State Lantern)
Insome circles,surprising as it may
seem, the assumption yet persists that
college training is unnecessary.
Thus the New York Times opposes
a suggestion that two years of col-
lege be required of a candidate for the
practice of law. While the Times
gives a specific reason for its stand,
namely, that such a restriction would
keep rugged and sturdy characters
like Abraham Lincoln out of the pro-
fession, it overlooks some of the actu-
alities of modern educational oppor-
tunities.
If Lincoln lived today he would be
the first to avail himself of present
day facilities for earning one's way
through college. He was not an op-
ponent of higher education. He suc-?
ceeded in spite of his inability to go to'
college, not because of it.
dne of the pleasantest methods yet
evolved for saving money, and one
which is applicable "to everystudent
in the purchase of a meal ticket at the

V

At an attractive price and en
self this spring. Drive it ur
then sell it. You'll be out onl
costs you for gas and oil.
Here Are a Few of Our B
1918 Roadster, Repainted .
Repainted
1917 D-45 Buick Touring .
1919 Chevrolet Touring..
With Starter

a

And speaking of ice reminds us that everything
points towards a hard winter.
L New Books
1 (Our Sunday Special)
"Julius Caesar", by William Shakespeare (Dun
and Bradstreet). A racy melodrama of the can-
vas period in history (when people clothed them-
selves in tents). Provides a valuable treatise. on
t he growth of conceit, by showing (to use the slang
expression) how Caesar got "stuck up". The cli-
max of the play, an intensely dramatic mob scene,
occurs during the course of a dinner when only a
pair of sardines were left on the plate, and in
willful violation of Cassius' lean and hungry look,.
Brutus et tu.
More Love Signals
(For use in correspondence)
Stamp upside down-I love you.
Stamp on straight-I don't commit myself.
Stamp left oblique-A kiss on the left cheek.
Samp right oblique-A kiss on t. right cheek.
Stamp sideways-One in thae middle.
No stamp-I'm broke.
Six two-cent stamps-Special delivery.
Famous Closing 1ines
"The hole is equal to the sum of its parts," ex-
plained the baker as he described his latest dough-

1918 Touring - Good
1917-Touring . .. .
1917 Chassis - Good .

* . . V
* . * .

. 0 .

H. S. PL A

Ford

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