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October 11, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-11

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WEATHER
OBABLY RAIN
TODAY

IL

Bk igan

Z aill

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

I

{

VOL. XXXII. No. 14.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1921

PRICE FIVE CENTS

EXTERIOR OF NE W
HOSPITAL RAPIDLY
S03E OF PLUMBING, HEATING
AND ELECTRICAL WORK
ALSO INSTALLED
COST OF WORK DONE TO
DATE NEAR $1,500,000

Fair Sex Don Knickers,-.-Brave
Startled Stares Of Here Males

(Editor's note:-The following com-
ments by two members of The Daily
staff, one a man and the other a wo-
man, were occasioned by the appear-
ance in the vicinity of the campus Sat-
urday morning of two women students
clad in knickerbockers.)
Again we have occasion to look
startled and repeat that time-worn
question, "What next?"
Two good looking pairs of golf-
knickers adorning the lower half of
two good looking University women
PLAN COMPLETION
OF READING ROOM,

Each Floor of Building Has Acre
Space, Completely Equipped
Throughout

of

The shell of the new University hos-
pital Is virtually completed, and all
the work now contracted for will be
finished within the next two or three
weeks. The University buildings and
grounds department has installed
some of the necessary plumbing, heat-
ing and electrical work, in addition
to the work done by the contractors.
Cost $1,5 0,000
Two iuindred men have been em-
ployed on the job all summer. About
2,750,000 krick have been laid, and
about 14,500 cubic yards of concrete
have been poured. A total of 1,200
tons -of reinforcing steel have been
used, and 300,000 floor tile laid. A
rough estimate of the total cost of the
huge structure to date is near $1,500,-
000.
The building is six stories high, and
has nine floors including the sub-base-
ment, except at the east end of the
building facing Catherine street,
where 10 floor levels are in view. It
has approximately an acre of space
on each floor, and is built so. that a
maximum amount of light will enter
the building, all windows being built
to the ceiling. There will not be a
single room in the building which will
not be naturally lighted.
On the upper six floors of the build-
ing -there will be 600 beds, and on the
roof of the building there will 'be a
space where patients may be wheeled
out into fresh air and sunsine. This
space will have a concrete fior and is
guarded by brick walls of sufficient
-height, so there will be no danger.
Complete Throughout
There is a large surgical amphithea-
ter on the ground floor of the building
and two smaller demonstration rooms
on the second floor. In the lower
floors there will be an artificial. ice
plant, cold storage rooms, machinery,
and special storage rooms for meat
and dairy products, fresh fruits and
vegetables. There will be storage for
general groceries and for miscellane-
ous hospital stores. It is the plan to
purchase supplies for the hospital in
carload lots, and the storage rooms
were built with this in view. The
kitchen and the various dining rooms
will be located on the ground floor.
Plans call for 10 elevators in thej
building with room for 4 more in case
the building is enlarged. All light,
heat and power will come from the
University power plant, and a tunnel
will be built from the power plant
to the hospital to carry the steam
lines.
Start Administration Building
The University plans to erect an
administration building to face Ann
street. This building will be four]
stories high and will contain the hos-
pital offices and receiving depart-
ment. At the present time the Uni-
versity buildings and grounds depart-
ment is making necessary surveys pre-
liminary to the erection of this build-
ing.
STAFF CLUB HEARS
ADDRESS BY KRAUS
"Synthetic Production of Precious
Stones" was the subject of a talk giv-
en by Dean Edward H. Kraus to the
Staff club of the Homoeopathic medi-
cal school at their luncheon Monday
noon. Dean Kraus spoke on the sub-
ject of minerology, telling of the va-
rious processes by which rubies and
sapphires are obtained for the mar-
ket. He pointed out the differences in
the stones which were produced by a
mechanical process and those which
were taken from the mines of India.
The meeting was the first this se-

mester of a series of monthly meetings
to be held during the year, and it is
planned to have speakers on various
subjects foreign to homoeopathy ad-
dress the club on each occasion.

American Legion Will Attempt
tion to Union as War
Memorial

Addi-

in Nickel's Arcade at noon. They
weren't golfing, because the Arcade
isn't a golf course; they weren't hik-
ing unless the function of the Arcade
has changed in the last few months!
Up to date only one solution has pre-
sented itself. The fair sex has adopt-
ed knee-trousers as the conventional
garb!
It was tough, fellows, when we
couldn't distinguish between our best
girl and her mother by means of the
clothes they affected! But what are
we going to do when we see our room-
mate on the diagonal and can't tell!
whether it is he or his best girl?
Girls in San Francisco are wearing
the khaki "trou." Girls in Chicago
use the sporty knicker. But alas, the
same dear population here still cling
to those old fashioned skirts! Skirts
that swish in the breeze and flap
around. They used to flap around
the ankles. If they're wide skirts they
balloon about like an apopletic circus.
If theyr'e narrow they resemble the
thin flapping of a scarecrow on duty.
These, it was, that put the flap into
fapper.
Of late the Mere Male has sat next
to woman in parliament, at the boxing
match and--judicially speaking, at the
'bar, and "where skirts were want to
ebb and flow, let coy knickers make
the style"-nor interfere with silken
hosiery specialties.
Chicago girls don't "knicker" to the
movies all by themselves and San
Francisco has not yet closed down its
marriage license office. Ann Arbor,
then, need not give the farewell weep
to the Soph Prom, the Fresh frolic or
fraternity frills.
And the moral to all this is, "Wear
'em with ease and joy."
FIRST PLAYRS CLUB0

FRESH MIXER AT
UNION TO1MORROW'
Guests at First Get-Together Will Be
Entertained By Vaudeville
and Boxing
PROF. HENDERSON, JACK
KELLEY, '24L, WILL SPEAK
Speakers, music and refreshments
have been arranged by the Union en-
tertainment committee for the big
freshman mixer, given to all '25 men
in the University tomorrow night in
the Union assembly hall. The Union,
the host for the evening, is giving the
party as a general informal get-to-
gether for the incoming students, in an
endeavor to bring them all together
and develop a strong class spirit.
Henderson to Speak
Prof. William D. Henderson, of the
University Extension division, will rep-
resent the faculty as the principal
speaker of the evening, Jack W. Kel-
ley, '24L, will be the other speaker
on the program.
R. V. Libonati, '24L, assistant chair-
man of the entertainment committee,
has ararnged a boxing match and Carl
Boswell, '24E and John L. Walter, '23,
will appear in a short singing skit as
the other number on the program.
Myron Chopa, '23, has arranged some
special saxaphone numbers which he
will play during intermissions of the
orchestra.
All Freshmen Welcome ,
All freshmen are urged to turn out
by the Union committee, as the plans
are for an informal meeting and get-
together of men of the various eoileges
ina single group. Cookies and ginger
ale will be served as refreshments and
admission will be free to all men of the
'25 class.
CAR P9ARMNG ON CAMPUS
MIENACE TOHUNVERSTY
FIRE DEPARTMENT COULDN'T GET
NEAR BUILDINGS, CLAIM
OF OFFICIALS

t
r,

HAS LONG BEEN SOUGHT FOR
BY STUDENTS AND ALUMNI
Plans for the completion of the
second floor reading room of the
Union as a memorial to Michigan
men killed in the war will be consid-
ered at a meeting of the American
Legion at 7:30 o'clock tomorrow night
in the reading room of the Union.
The arrangement, as yet only tenta-
tively considered by the University
post, will be thoroughly discussed
and possible plans for raising the*
sum of money necessary will be pre-
sented.
The American Legion, which is
sponsoring the project, hopes to se-
cure the support of all service men
in the University, according to Floyd
A. Sergeant, '22, post commander, and
a large turnout is desired for that
reason. The plan has not been work-
ed out in definite form as yet, but the
*men who are behind it have met with
unqualified support from both stu-
dents and faculty members when ap-
proached on the subject.
TOMORROW IS LAST
CHANCE FOR O. S. IU.-
TICKET SELECTION
Students are again notified that all
applications for tickets to the Ohio
State game must be in by 6 o'clock
Wednesday, Oct. 12, if the applicant
desires to exercise his class- prefer-
ence rights in the distribution of tick-
ets. Applications after that time will
be filled with the general distribution
and it will not matter whether a man
be a senior or freshman.
About 1,700 students have failed to
make application for tickets to the
Ohio State game to date. As the out-
side demand for tickets is so great,
4t may also be necessary to limit each
student to only one ticket where ap-
plicantions are received after the
above date. It is suggested that all
students read the rules for the dispos-
al of tickets on the back of the appli-
cation slips and in their athletic books.
THOMAS ANNOUNCES
MANDOLIN TRYOUTS
Try-buts for the Varsity Ma'ndolin
club will be held at 7 o'clock tonight
in room 308, Michigan Union A large
turnout is desired by Frank L. Thom-
as, newly appointed director of the
combined clubs, as a musical enter-
tainment is planned for the near fu-
ture and the policy for the coming
year involves an expansion of person-
nel.
A number of banjos are to be used
this year and try-outs for this spe-
cialty are particularly requested to
appear. Guitar playerse are also de-
sired.
The number and quality of the men
who tried out for the Glee club last
week was reported yesterday by Mr.
Thomas as being encouraging. Simi-
lar results with the Mandolin club
will permit an early Ann Arbor ap-
pearance and an out-of-town trip, de-
pending on its success.

non at 3 o'clock in room, 308 of the
Union.
Music manuscripts should be inj
readiness for a trial rehearsal at this
time, as it will be the last opportunity
for any prospective Opera music to
be given a trial before the director]
News of the Day
IN BRIEF
Newark, N. J., Oct. 10.-Russell K.
Crimple, king kleagle of the southern
New Jersey plan of the Klu Klux
Klan, today announced that orders
have been received from the organi-
ation national headquarters in At-
lanta, Ga., forbidding use of regalia
outside lodge rooms.
Chicago, Oct. 10.-The White Sox
regained their title as Chicago cham-
pions by defeating the Cubs 9 to 5
today. It was the fifth successive vic-
tory for the American leaguers, the,
National leagues failing to win ar
game.
Washington, Oct. 10.-The Borah
bill for tolls exemptions of American
coastwise vessels passing through the
Panama canal was passed by he sen-
ate today 47 to 37. The measure now
goes to the house, where It is expect-!
ed, it will be subject to indefinite de-
lay in consideration, at least until aft-
er the conference on limitations of
armament.
Before proceeding to the final vote
the senate rejected without the roll
call two substitutes offered by Senator
King, Democrat, Utah, to authorize the
President to negotiate for arbitration
of the toll question and to appro-
priate $2,000,000 as a subsidy for
American vessels using the canal.
NEED 125 STUDENTS
FOR URBANA SPECIA
UNION MAKING ARRANGEMENTS
ON RATES WITH RAILROAD
COMPANIES

MEETING ON THURSDAYI

Opera Composers HOT LEADS YANKS
Assemble' Today
All men who have written music for
he 1922 Michigan Union Opera should
report to E Mortimer Shuter, di-
rector of Union dramatics, this after-

BROOKLYN YOUTH LOSES CHANCE
FOR SECOND SHUTOUT BY
McNALLY'S SLIP
RUTH CROSSES GIANTS
BY LAYING DOWN BUNT
Bambino Fails to Connect for Circuit
But Scores Run That Beats
McGraw

I

HARVARD
TOBE

47 WORKSHOP PLAY
MAIN FEATURE OF
PROGRAM

Players club will hold its opening
meeting at 8 o'clock Thursday night in.
Sarah Caswell Angell hall, presenting
"Three Pills in a Bottle," a Harvard
47 Workshop play. There will be no
admission charge -and the entertain-
ment will be open to all those wishing
to attend. Special music under the
direction of R. B. Ritter will follow.
After the program the work and
aims of the club will be explained.
Membership is open to the faculty,
students, and friends of the Univer-
sity. The club was organized last year
by Prof. R. D. T. Hollister and now
has a membership of 200.
On Nov. 29 and 30 the club will
present Richard Sheridan's comedy,
"The School for Scandal." Decision
on tryouts for this play is in process.
Members and prospective members of
the club are eligible.
The cast of characters for "Three
Pills in a Bottle" is as follows:
Tony Sims .....:.Lucile Magnusen, '24
The Widow Sims............
.......Katherine Greenough, '23
A Middle Aged Gentleman ....
.............Howard Tubbs, '22
His Soul .......... Anita Youell, '23
A Scissors Grinder..Robert Tubbs, '22
His Soul.........Harold Lipsitz, '22
A Scrub Woman.Celma Simonson, '23
Her Soul.........mHelen Elliott, '23
EFFICIENT CLASS OFFICERS
URGED BY REGISTRAR HALL
Says Every Care Should Be Taken in
Choosing Experienced
Persons
In anticipation of the coming class
elections, Registrar Arthur G. Hall
suggests that every care should be
exercised in the choice of persons ex-
perienced in the proper handling of
finances and recording of records.
Registrar Hall, having the respon-
sibility of auditing the books of the
various campus organizations, states
that in former years persons were oft-
en elected as treasurers who did not
possess the requisite qualifications

"Privately owned automobiles are
so thoroughly blocking the\ various
driveways that run through the cam-
pus that some measure must be taken
to relieve conditions," said Mr. E. C.
Pardon, superintendent of the build-
ings and grounds department. "We
have eight trucks and four teams that
average 20 trips a day to the different
buildings on the campus. The auto-
mobiles so block the driveways that it
is an impossibility for the University
trucks to get through. As a result
time is wasted as well as the Uni-
versity's money. And then, too, this
is a menace to the University as a
whole. In case of fire, the fire de-'
partment would be unable to get inl
close proximity to any of the build-
ings."
As a result of these existing condi-
tions, stickers are tieing printed
wbich will be attached to any auto-
mobiles parked in important places
about th^ campus. The stickers will
read as follows:
By 1-i-ting your car at this point7
By ii are Violating our traffic rules.
Endangering our fire protection.
Blocking a necessary thoroughfare.
Reducing the efficiency of our
transportation and increasing the
cost of our operation, thereby in-
directly affecting the cost of ed-
ucation.
Making possible a move to eliiin-
ate all parking on University
drives.,
THINK IT OVER
and
Give us your co-operation
PROF. WENLEY SPEAKS AT
DANTE MEMORIAL MEETING+
Many Italians in Attendance; Signor
Ricordi Addresses Assembly
in Native Tongue
Prof. Robert M. Wenley, of the phil-
osophy department, delivered an ad-
dress in Detroit last Sunday at a meet-
ing held at the Light Guard Armory in
observance of the 600th anniversary of
the death of Dante.
Professor Wenley was the only one
on the program who delivered his
speech in English, the others speaking
Italian. Signor Ricordi, an ' Italian
statesman, was the other chief speak-
er at the commemoration.

If 125 students buy tickets to Ur-
bana to attend the Michigan-Illinois3
game Oct. 29, the Union will schedulet
a special train to leave Ann Arbor
Friday evening and arrive in Urbana
Saturday morning. Officials of the
Union are completing arrangements
with the railroad companies. The ex-3
act fare, route and time schedulel
have not yet been agreed upon, but
announceemnt will be made within at
few days. Round trip tickets will
cost $14.60 or less. Tickets will not
go on sale at the Union until all de-
tails are complete, which will re-c
quire several days more.t
Inquiry regarding railroad rates to
Madison has also been mnade, and
negotiations for a special fare for thet
Michigan-Wisconsin game Nov. 12
will commence soon. Further an-
nouncement will be made as soon as
details are settled.
NELSON TO EXPLAIN
COMEDY CLUB PLAY
J. Raleigh Nelson, associate profes-
sor of English in the engineering col-
lege, will tell about the play which
the Comedy club will present about
the middle of January at the initial
meeting of that organization at 7:30
o'clock tomorrow night in SarahCas-
well Angell hall. Plans for the-com-
ing year will also be discussed.
Any student on the campus is eligi-
ble for membership in the Comedy
club and tryouts will be held next
Saturday morning, the definite time
and place to be announced later.

(By Associated Press)
New York, Oct. 10.-A bunt in a
baseball game doesn't hold a candle
to a home run as a spectacular feat,
but a little bunt, which "Babe" Ruth
laid down at the Polo grounds today
showed how much importance attaches
to the less sensational performance.
The "Babe's" home run in the ninth
inning of Sunday's game was for the
Yankee'sas a team just one more run
and nothing more. His bunt in the
fourth inning of today's game, the fifth
in the 1921 World series, proved the
turning point of the contest, which
was won by the American leaguers by
the score of 3 to 1 over their National
league opponents. The victory gave
the Yankees a one game lead in the
series.
Great Defensive Work
Hoyt, the boy wonder from the Flat-
bush section of Brooklyn, pitcher the
Yankees to their third victory in the
series, his potent right arm 'being aid-
ed by some great defensive work on
the part of his team mates, in hold-
ing the Giants scoring to a minimum.
He had been scored upon in the
first inning, an error by McNally pav-
ing the way to the Giants' only tally,
but the Yankees tied the score in the
third when Mike McNally was passed
by Art Nehf, the "Giant crack left
hander, went to third on Wally
Schang's double, and came home on
Elmer Miller's sacrifice fly.
Then, to start the fourth for the
Yankees, Ruth, who had struck out
his first time up did the unexepected
and laid down a bunt. The Giant in-
field was taken by surprise and Ruth
landed safely on first. The way had
been opened for a tally and Ruth
scored it a moment later when "Bob"
Muesel popped a double to left which
his brother Emil on the Giant team
seemed somewhat slow in handling.
This ultimately proved to be the win-
ning - run for the Yankees, but an-
other was speedily addedwhen Muesel
scored on Aaron Ward's sacrifice fly.
Pitches Heady ame
That ended the scoring for the day.
Hoyt, who had seemed a bit unsteady
in the early innings settled down be-
hind his two run lead and pitched a
heady game which had the big guns in
the Giant lineup guessing when safe
blows were necessary to put runs
across. The youthful twirler was hit
more freely than in his shut-out game
of last Thursday as the 10 safdties for
the National leaguers attest, but he
would have had another scoreless
game to his credit except for an error
by McNally on George Burns' hard
bounder. As it was the Flatbush boy
won the honor of being the first lox
man to win two games in the present
series and of holding the heavy hitting
men of the McGraw clan to one solit-
ary run in 18 innings.
The crowd numbered more than
35,000.
GYM CLASSES OPEN
TJESDA Y, OCT. 18
Dr. George A. May, director of Wat-
erman gymnasium, announces that
freshman gym c16sses will start Tues-
day, Oct. 18. It is important that all
freshmen, engineers as well as lits, be
classified for gym work by that time.
The date given in the catalogue for the
opening of classes is Nov. 7, but since
the health lectures will be over before
that date, it was decided to start work
as soon as possible.
AV important departure will be
made in the preliminary program this
year, in that as much work will be -
taken out doors as possible, and more
stress will be placed on such work
than ever before. The setting-up exer-
cises will be given outside whenever
possible, and men arb therefore asked

to provide themselves sweaters or jer.
seys and keep them on hand in the
Evmnasium.

-

Douglas Dow, '22E, Ill at St. Joseph's for such a position.
Douglas Dow, '22E, president of the
student advisory committee, is a pa- Union Orchestra Meets Tonight
tient at St. Joseph's hospital on In- A meeting of all try-outs for the
galls street. Dow is sick from a com- Michigan Union orchestra has been
bined cold and sterptecoccus infec- called by Carl V. Moore, director.
tion. He expects to return to his They are asked to report at 7 o'clock
work in a few days. tonight in room 308 of the Union.

SENIOR LITS, NOTICE
All senior lits will meet at 4
o'clock today in University Hall
for the purpose of organization.
At this meeting, at which a full
attendance is desired, nomina-
tions for officers will be made.

*~1
-I

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