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March 31, 1922 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-03-31

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN FRIDAY, MARCH 31, 1922

"I

.

MC CONNELL WILL
TALK HERE SUNDAY
Dr. Francis J. McConnell, bishop of
the Methodist church, of Pittsburg,'
Pa., will be the speaker at Univer-
sity services in Hill auditorium this
Sunday night. Changing the plan
from previous services this one will
begin at 7:30 o'clock instead of 7
o'clock.
ED Bishop McConnell graduated from
Ohio Wesleyan university in 1894, re-
ceiving the Bachelor of Arts degree.
Three years later he received his Doc-
's tor of Philosophy degree from Boston
Y universty. He was president of De
Pauw university from 1909 to 1912. He
was made bishop in 1912 in the Meth-
odist Episcopal church. Recently he
has been in Eutope and will embody
some of the experiences of his trip
in the speech which he is to deliver
sal in Ann Arbor. The subject of his
i speech has not been announced yet.

ALL OUT FOR CONVOCATION

GUEST
['ERDA

At 11 o'clock this morning the University inaugurates'
the first of a series of convocations to be held one each month
for the remainder of the present school year. Classes will be
dismissed during that hour. The gathering will have the
good fortune to be addressed by Dr. George Edgar Vincent,
president of the Rockefeller foundation. Besides being a
,speaker of extraordinary merit, Dr. Vincent is a nationally
renowned figure in medical education.
The convocation this morning is an experiment. Owing
to the size of the University and the wide scope of its curri-
cula, it has been practically impossible to find a time for
assembly when the vast majority of the student body is free
to attend, unless all activities are officially suspended for
the occasion. Realizing the value of these general meet-
ings, the University has taken the steps necessary to their
establishment.
If the convocations this year are a success they will be
continued, and through them the student body will have the
opportunity to hear many of America's most prominent
speakers and greatest men. But only a full attendance at
this morning's convocation and during the months to come
can make this privilege a lasting one.

COMMITTEE GRANTS
BAND TRIP PERMIT
Permission for the University of
Michigan band to go on tour during
the Spring vacation was granted to-1
day by the Committee on Student Af-!
fairs Owing to the ,fact that this is
the first attempt to carry on anything
of this kind by the band, permission
to go ahead with the plans was with-
held for some time.
At the present time all plans are
complete and the band will start from
nn Arbor Monday, April 12. Be-
ause this is its first trip, it was nec-
essary for the management to secure
definite statements from the alumni in
the propsed towns as to the desira-
bility of having the band there. Six(
towns have been secured and the band
will play every day of the week be-
ginning April 12.
OF LIBRARY TODAY

AC

NTATIV
SUPS TA

It

ALL C
Two Con

of t
en"

ES CLOSE IN
OURT TOURNEY

ME

-Cli

Grand Rapids Ujilon, Highland Park,
Soutueastern, .,nd; Kalamagoo
Win Games
CONTESTS HARD FOUGHT IN
PRELIMINARY ROUND CLASS A

the fun-
re need-
e more
ed world

ral standards Close scores and hard fought bat-
Passing from tles throughout marked the
physical well- prelimin-
cess, President ary round of the Class A Interschol-
r "first things" astic basketball tournament held in
ividual life to Waterman gymnasium last night.
d intelligence, Union High school, of Grand Rap-
y, a properly
ork and play, ids, defeated, Western High school, city
d touch of the champions of Detroit, in the opening
game, 25-23. At half time the Furni-
ture City aggregation led by a score
ub will hold a of 18-12. The Detroit boys came back
30 o'clock this in the second half and with four min-
all. Dean Wal- utes remaining to play the score
ersity of Mis- stood 25-23.
rganization at Highland Park Wins
:15 o'clock this Highland Park won a listless game
hall. from Pontiac in the 8 o'clock session.
s Academy Neither team displayed a great amount,
tions of the of speed nor team play.
scheduled for Dickeson with some impossible shots
The biolo- from the side of the floor was the
iheon at noon star of the Highland Park team. Cul-
meeting of the verwell, the lanky center, and Ed-
Prof. tH. A. wards,' forward, also showed well at
gy department times.
address the Pontiac, playing most of the game
,ademy at 4:15 on the defensive, put up a .real fight.
in the Natural At the half the score stood 9-8 in fav-
or of Highland Park. Watchpocket,
will hold their Davis Baer and Dawson Baer were
on at noon Sat. the best of the Pontiac team.
inasium Southeastern Triumphs
ermitted to do In the third game Southeastern of
fitted to do, we Detroit finally won from Flint Cen-
and twice as tral 28-25. The game started faster
J. M. Cattell, than any game of the evening but both
lecture before teams soon weakened although a fast
1 Science aud brand of basketball was displayed
hree-fourthfa throughout. Wilcox, the Flint cen-
r their present ter substituting for Furgesoru who was
the duty of left at home with blood poisoning con-
nine the envi- tracted in the recent Ann Arbor game,
re best suited," showed well. Weiss, the running
b guard, was the best man on the floor
schools have in his department. When Weiss was
on human be, disqualified in the sedond half by
sary for a bet- Referee Olds for rough playing the
he psychologi- team was badly weakend. Ever-
finding the ft- heart and MacDougle starred for the
t into common winners.
pressing needs Kalamazoo defeated Negaunee by a
ecturer. Many 39 to 32 score in the last game of the
entific researchy evening. The first half was all Kala-
L the works of mazoo in every way, the lower-state
and Professor basketeers leading by a 14 point max-
>raised by the .gin at the end of that period. Negau-
nee came back with such punch nd
fight in the second period that for a
time all indications pointed toward
ch as History?" their overcoming the Kalamazoo lead
ich ,Prof. David and winning the game. However,
ry department their efforts fell shy by 7 markers.
-, spoke yester- Righter was by far the best man on
I Science audi- either side, garnering 13 points for
the program of Kalamazoo.
asters' club.
"-1lluzzy HOUSE C0MMTTEE AT UNION
in this day ENFORCES RULES ON STUDENT
LiULWIILY 1 IIin fhn

VINCENT SPEAKERI
FOR CONVOCATION
First Affair of Its Kind Will Be
Held at 11 O'clock This
Morning
CLASSES WILL BE DISMISSED
SO STUDENTS MAY ATTEND
Attendance at the first monthly Uni-
versity convocation this morning pro-
mises to be large. Seats have been
reserved on the stage for members of
the faculties and the deans, while the
main auditorium will be thrown open
to the student body and members of
the Schoolmasters' club.
The convocation will commence
promptly-at 11 o'clock with an address
by Dr., George E. Vincent, president of
the Rockefeller foundation, on "The
School and Public -Health." Dr. Vin-
cent was formerly president of , the
University of Minne'sota.
All University classes will be sus-
pended in time for the convocation,
and the Student council urges that all
members of the student body make a
special effort to be present.
t I

724 PROM- SOCIALE 0F IK N
Grand March Beginning it 9 O'clock
Will Usher in Ainaul
Galties
FRESAMEN WARNED THAT THEY
ARE NOT ELIGIBLE TO ATTEND
Prom goers will begin to assemble
for the grand march at 9 o'clock to-
morrow night in the Union ball room,
as the first dance number marks the
opening feature of the annual sopho-
more social event.
Following the gran4 march War-
ing's "Pennsylvanians" will swing into
a program of dance music which will
continue with the exception of brief
intervals until 2 o'clock. -
The "no corsage" regulation which
has been in force for all recent Uni-
versity affairs must be observed by
guests at the Prom, according to mem-
bers of the committee. -No woman
guest may wear flowers at the dance.
Any freshman who is in possession
of a Sophomore Prom ticket and in-
tends to make use of it in gaining en-
trance to the Prom, is certain to be
apprehended at the door or during the
course of the dance, and,summarily
dealt with, according to -miembers of
the Prom committee.
If not detected at the door, he will
be evicted and his girl will be- escort-.
ed to her home by a member of the
committee.
Any freshman who is evicted will
also be reported to the Underclass
conduct committee, which body will
decide the ultimate punishment to be
inflicted upon the offender.
The price of the ticket will be re-
funded, to any freshman in possession
of one if he will return it to Donald
Steketee at 1437 Washtenaw avenue,
before 4' o'clock this afternoon. After
this hour no tickets will be accepted.,
This plan has the endorsement of
members of the Student council, the
Underclass conduct committee, and the
Sophomore Prom committee.
SWIMMING POOL DRIVE

BUILDING DEDICATED TO SON
WHO DIED IN THE WORLD WAR
Regent William Lawr nce Clements,
of Bay City, will lay the cornerstone
of the Clements Library of American
History at 2 o'clock this afternoon.
This library, which Mr. Clements is
donating to the University as a me-
morial to his son, James Renville
Clements, who died in the World war,
will house his collection of books re-
lating to the discovery, exploration,
and settlement of America, which
ranks as one of the three best in this
country. I
Ceremonies to Be Simple
The formalities attending the lay-
ing of the cornerstone will be brief
and marked by extreme simplicity.
Wiliam W. Bishop, libraria'n of the
University, will make a short, ad-
dress
The chief interest of Regent Cle-
ments' life, aside from his home and
business affairs, is his library, to the
collection of which he. has devoted
many years. The collection embraces
about 2,500 volumes of newspapers
and about 5,000 books, many of which,
are of priceless value. Perhaps the,
most notable single volume in the en-,
tire ,library is Thomas Hariot's de-
scription of Virginia. Last summer
Mr. Clements enriched the collection

Regent Clements Will Be Chief
ure in Ceremonies; Bishop
Will Speak

the Sena
fairs ha
public s
play, wa
tion tak4

Fig.

held
iby

over
Ev

n addition to den
of their position o
heartily endorse tb
ed in The Michig
morning concernit
committee. The E
as follows:
1. Resolved: T
of the University
ily endorse the o
The Michigan Dail
30, and desire to
supporting its po
2. Resolved: 'I
is to discover the
quo" pf women or
we admitted to t
full rights, as ar
are we admitted v
the former, why
accorded full rig
who imposes rest
the authority to
whom can we alp

FiN SH RGRAM P NS
FOR "MICHIGAN NIGHT"
COACH YOS' COMPLETES DETAILS
FOR RADIO BROADCASTING
APRIL 29
Coach Fielding H. Yost has com-
pleted arrangements for the "Michi-
gin Night" program which is to . be
broadcasted throughout the Middle
West Saturday night, April 29. The

rece

program for the event, announced re-
cently, has' 'been formally 'arranged,
and Coach Yost in his meeting with
the officials of the broadcasting. sta-
tion Wednesday, drew up the minor
details of the sending.
The program will start at 8 o'clock
eastern standard time and will con-
tinue for two hours. A wave length
of 360 meters will be used, this being
announced to facilitate those who will
attempt to hear the program to ad-
just their' apparatus. The program,
according to the broadcasting sta-
tion, should be received any place
east of the Rocky mountains, with es-
pecially good results in Michigan,
Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and 'Wiscon-
sin.
The schedule of events is as fol-
lows:
"Victors" and "Varsity" by the
Varsity band; a talk by "Duke"
Dunne, captain of last year's football
team; a few words by Paul Gdebel,J
captain of the 1922 football team; a
speech by Carl Johnson, former Uni-
versity track star, and captain of the
1920 team; a talk by "Ernie" Vick,
baseball captain and all-American
center; a speech by Judge William
Heston, former 'football star and all-
time, all-American halfback; locomo-
tive and U. of M. yells; a speech by
Coach Yost; ;Michigan songs by the
Varsity Glee club; a talk by Regeni

by the purchase of the manuscript of
the Earl of Shelburne, who was home
secretary during the American revo-
lution. In addition to the collection
itself, Mr. Clements has had compil-
ed a supplementary library of some
300 volumes dealing with American
colonial history from the English
viewpoint.
Graduate of University
Regent Clements received the de-
gree of bachelor of science in 1882
from the University. At present he is
head of the Bay City Industrial
Works, large manufacturers of loco-
motive cranes, and is president of two
banks in Bay City. He is also an
active member of the American Anti-
quarian society and the American
Historical association..
Personally, Mr. Clements has in
generous quantity the qualities one
usualy finds in a really successful
man. As .a Regent of the University,
in which capacity he has served
since 1909, he has not, only shown
himself to be whole-heartedly devoted
to its best interests, but has also been
responsible for many benefactions.

play:
Editor,
In v

l
x
4
5
r
1
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I
3

PLANS NEAR COMPLETION

ml
b;
apt

dividuality, in the
is swept off his
id restrictions of
ssor Muzzy. "The
restrain his hon-
said. That the
history necessi-
that this implies
History must be
e aim, to prepare
citizenship.
'democracy from
view, Professor
ndividual thought
hts as an Ameri-
of his duties as

For violation of the house rules of
the Union, one student was barred
from attending Union dances until'
May 15, when the case came up for
hearing before the Union house com-
mittee yesterday afternoon. This is
the first action taken by the com-
mittee this year, and came after a se-
ries of threats had failed to reduce
the acts of vandalism about the
building.
The committee, composed of Fran-
cis Smith, '22, chairman, R. Jerome
Dunne, '24L, George Gregory, '22E,
B. P. Campbell, '22, and Vernon Hil-
lery, '23, will meet every two weeks
to hear any additional cases that may
come up. The reward of $50 for in-
formation leading to the apprehen-
sion of the parties who have taken
telephone receivers, telephones, and
destroyed property in the Union, is
still offered. Vigorous measures will

on tie Junior Gris'
<day morning's issue of
Daily and in fairness
both committees it sh
that the recommendati(
atic committee that tl
not be opened to the
was made by a unani
was in turn unanimous]
accepted by all the n
'Senate committee on
who were present. I1
approval of the presid
men's league and the c
Student advisory com'
with the senate commis
ings.
Yours tru
DEAN J. a

ONE THOUSAND STUDE TS TO SO-
LICIT $28,000 FOR 17ION
PROJECT1
Every student who returns home
during the spring vacation will be
asked to solicit funds for the comple-
tion of the Union swimming pool. This
body of solicitors will be iA addition to
those in the organizations of the sev-
en states, Michigan, New York, Penn-
sylvania, Ohio, Indiain, Illinois and
Wisconsin.
Lists of alumni living in every sec-
tion of the country other than the sev-
en states where the drive will be con-
ducted more intensively will be placed
at the desl in the Union lobby. Stu-
dents from these states are asked to,
look over the names during the after-
noon today, Saturday, Monday, Tues-
day, and Wednesday of ne-t week, and
take down those whom thet will see.
the names are listed by cities alpha-
betically and will therefore be avail-
able. It is estimated that; more than
1,000 workers will be active raising
funds during the spring vaction.
Original estimates required $50,000
to complete the pool, but the decline'
in the cost of materials makes is pos-
sible to finish the project for $40,000.
Of this amount $12,000 has already

SEATE APPROVES LAST
OF ARMS PARLEY PACTS
Washington, March 30. - Senate
completed approval of the arms con-
ference treaties today by ratifying the
last pact of conference series, the nine
power agreement for revision of Chin-
ese tariff. Vote was 58 to 1, Senator
King, Democrat, Utah, casting the neg-
ative vote. Of the affirmative votes
18 were cast by Democrats.
Earlier in the day the senate had
unanimously ratified the Far Eastern
treaty, on which virtually no differ-
ence of opinion developed.
REGENTS DISCUSS BUILDING
PROGRAM AND ANNUAL BUDGET

To the Committee on Stud
Dean J. A. Bursley, Chairs
The Committee on Dram
izations is unanimously of
that it would be unwise I
public performance of I
Girls' play. The chief reas
decision follow:
1. This issue should no
ed by the question of ra
for the league building.
ciple involved is too impo
subordinated to any extra
sideration, however weig
2. In making this decis
no desire to thwart the
dents in a matter of colle
that is prignariiy their o'
We believe, however, that
truly expresses the so'
thought of both men and
3. We wish to state e
that the nature and qua
performance have not and
been called into question
is characterized by high a
faithfully and skillfully
It is a credit to the Univer
tirely fit for presentation
audience. A change frot
type of audience, howeve
a 1e' s homogenous sort w
ably tend to modify th
which years of growth I
It should be remembered t
i for play is more than a

James 0. Murfin; songs by the Varsity'
quartet; music by the Varsity Man-
dolin club; a speech 'by President
Marion L. Burton; singing of "The
Yellow and Blue" by the Varsity Glee
club.
Already many of the alumni associa-
tions in the state have written in sig-
nifying their intentions of listening to
the program. Letters have also come
from isolated groups who have been
informed of the event, and the alum-
ni at Denver, Colo.; have declared that
they wish to answer at the end ofl
the event, expressing " their senti-

Discussion of the annual budget will
largely occupy the time of the Board
of Regents at their monthly meeting,
which commenced last night at 7:30
o'clock. The meeting reconvenes this
morning at 9:30 o'clock. Building
plans may also be discussed at this
meeting. The Regents will adjourn
for the University convocation at 11
o'clock, and again at 2 o'clock for the

dressed the
f Teach4rs'

been raised, which lean
the goal of this campaigi

$28,000 as
A filtering

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