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March 25, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-03-25

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mrik - AAl

F>,

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ASSOCIA
DAY AKN I
PRES

,

'4

SANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 1922'

PRICE

I I -

IT HERE
OF HARVARD,
DUTIES IN

NCY LEFT
TH OF ADAMS'

Pointing
Ad.

cement 'was made late' yes-
om the President's office of
ntment of Prof. Edmund E.
larvard university, to head
>mics department at Mich-
ofessor, Day will become a
ssor of economics, and will
his official title "chairman
partment of economics, and
Af the curricula in business'
ation."
or Day will assume his of-
es here at the beginning of
d semester next year,, when
ation' at Harvard takes ef-
will fill the place of the late
ry, C. Adams, who was head
nomics department until his
August.
Nationally Recognized
opinion views the appoint-
mne significant for the econ-
artment. Professor Day at
ofessor of economics at Har-
ersity, is becoming national-
ized as an economist and a
his profession..
ons point to expansion of
ula in business administra-
er the newgdirector. For
epast the growing need of
anced and comprehensive
in the subjebt has-been rec-
nd the possibility .of a grad-!

R.0. T C. To Snd
Concert BIy Raio
The concert of the Detroit Sym-
phony orchestra to be given iii Hill
auditorium on Monday night, will be
broadcasted by the R. 0. T. C. raio
phone sending apparatus. This will
make the concert accessible to more
than 300 amateur stations within the
50 mile range of the apparatus.
Previous trials have been so suc,
cessful that those in charge of the
work plan to continue the service..
"We will send out all concerts up
to and including the May Festival,"
stated Major Robert Arthur, of, the
Michigan unit of the R. 0. T. C., yes-
terday. The department intends to
keep the sending apparatus in opera-
tion until just after the Festival,
when it will be -dismantled for the
summer.
INCL1UDES,6 STOPS'
Saginaw, Muskegon, Lansing, 8alama-
zoo, Jackson, and Toledo on
Vacation Trip. Route
OPENING CONCERT WILL BE
GIVEN IN HILL AUDITORIUM
Six cities are on the itinerary of
the University band for the first of
its proposed annual spring tours.,
Members of the committee have been
over the state during the past week;
closing the plans and securing the ap-
proval and support of the alumni in
the different cities to be visited.
First Performance Here
The opening performance will be
given April 6 in Hill auditorium for
the benefit of students., Tickets will
go on sale several days in advance.
The Ann Arbor performance will be
exactly the same as the one to be
given on the road.
D ates for the appearance in the ci-
ties finally selected. are: Saginaw
April 10, Muskeg& April 11, Lansing
April 12, Kalamazoo April 13, Jack-
son April 14, and Toledo pApril 15.
Francis B. Thomas, '22, chairinan of
the band committee, and Seth L. Bid-
well, '24L, who have been visiting
the cities on the route, have report-
ed favorably oil the suport of alum-
ni in the various cities toward the
Varsity band performance. .
The Toledo alumni have been espe-
cially active in securing a date on
the schedule for their city.
80 to Make Trip .
Preparations are uhder way for en-,
tertaining the 80 men who will make
the trip n the..various towns..Dances
and dinners are being planned. The
final program will include individual
and collective numbers by the band,
and 'four spe6ialty, numbers chosen'
from approved campus talent.
Formals- At Union
Are Discontinued:

TACK SEND -Off
POORLY SUPPORTED
Band and Small Number of Students
Arrive at Station Just as
T Train Leaves
VARSITY OPPOSES CORNELL
IN DUAL MEET AT ITHACA
'ith the band striking up the first
strains of "The Victors," the train
bearing Michigan's track team left at
3:45 o'clock yesterday afternoon for
Detroit, the first step in the trip to
Ithaca for a dual meet tonight with
the Red and White contestants.
The band left Hill auditorium at
3:20 o'clock, followed by a handful
of 'supporters, and wended its way
in the 'direction of the Michigan Cen-
tra' station, where the squad was to
en ain. Effort was made all along
the line of march to gather up rooters
ant incorporate them in the ranks of
supporters who had -turned out for
the occasion.
Whether due to the fact that Mich-
igau has not had a winning team so
far" this year or to other causes, the
attempthmet ith little success, and
whenthe party reached the station it
was -not much larger than it had been
at Ahe beginning.
Because .of a late start, the band
reached 'its destination just as the
train bearing Michigan's trackmen
was pulling' out of the station. Strik-
lngg'up "The Victors" once more, the
musicians rushed to reach' the last
cal which contained the Varsity ath-
lete ยง.
,Y.I.ITO ENTERTAIN1
t IINFUSTRIL COUCIL,
D ROIT GIELSM ORGANIZATION
MEETS HERE TODAY AND
TOMORROW
Final plans have been made by the
University Y. W. C. A. for entertain-
ing the Industrial Girls' council of
Detroit, which is to be here this week
en The council is composed of the
pr eidents of all the industrial.girls'
el s in Detroit as well as the officers
of w he club fedeltion.
A 6:45 o'clock tonight a chop
suey supper will be served at the
Y. afeteria. Members of the cabinet
and the advisory committee and oth-I
ers may attend. Reservations must1
bemade immediately.
The meeting which will"be held at
10 o'clock Sunday morning in Newber-
ry hall will be opened by Mrs. Mar-I
ionp.. Burton, after which there will
be an open discussion betwen the
industrial and, the University women.
Miss Ada Mack of Detroit and Dorothy
ley, '24, will. lead these talks. Dr.
Ricard Hogue will also speak.
.lee 10 minute tals will be the
m nfeature of the 'afternoon ses-
slo n, which will be held at 2:30 o'clock
in Newberry hall. Miss Glolde
Grne, of the British Working Wom-
en s college, will discuss "Workers'
Education in England." "The Posi-
tioih of Women in Russia" will be the
sub ct of a short address by Mrs.
0. M. Gruhzit, and Clara Eastlake willi
tal on "Industrial Women in Japan.
;Fiowng these talks tea will be
served."

AMrs. Nikoloric Is
Concert SolJois t

An entire program of piano music
will be offered at the Twilight facfi-
ulty concert at 4:15 o'clock Sunday
afternoon i'n Hill auditorium. Mrs.
Margaret Nikoloric, of New York
City, wil be the soloist.
Mrs. Nikoloric recently returned
from Europe and won recognition in
her New York debut. She has since
appeared in a number of large cities
where her original success has been
repeated.
The program is as follows:
Two Intermezzi, Opus 118, No.
1; Opus 119, No. 3...... Brahms
Nocturne in C Sharp minor, Opus
27....................Chopin
Two Etudes, F major and A min-
or.................Chpin
Prelude, Chorale and Fugue ....
.............Clsar Franck
Promenade vers le mer ....Koechlin
Two Movements Perpetuels..Poulenc
Voiles ...........Debussey
Reflets dans-l'eau ........Debussey
Ce qu'a vu le vent d'Ouest..Debussey
N
GIRLSPLAY AGIN
PLEAESUDIENCE
Confidence Gained in First Showing
Reflected in Increased Merit
of Production
EASE, FINESSE CHARACTERIZE
SECOND NIGHT'S PERFORMANCE
(By Katherine Montgomery and
Dorothy Bennetts)
Ease and finesse -characterized the
second appearance of "Scepters and
Serenades" given last night at the
Whitney theater by the Juniorgirls,
distinguishing it from the first per,.
formance when the characters were
confronted for the first time with the
problem of putting the play across.
The confidence gained by the success
of the first night enabled the cast and
choruses to project themselves more
heartily into their parts.
The artistic qualities of. the play
were greatly augmented by the pic-
turesque scenery and lighting effects.
Many local touches in the lines added
to the humor and the plot made
"Scepters and Serenades more than
a musical comedy.
It is almost unfair to select any
outstanding characters, yet mention
should be made of Anne Mushkin who
played the difficult role of the Magus
in a most satisfactory manner and
of Louise Graham, who portraye'd well
the part of Prinedss Tahi.
A chorus of college men gained
the first enthusiasm from a somewhat
cold and distant audience Later the
monocle chorus led by Marian Hal:
as Chauncey was repeatedly 'encored.
To Prof. John L. Brumm, director
of the play, must be given credit for
its success. The almost professional
touch testify tohis ability as a pro-
ducer.
In close competition to the girls who
made such excellent "men," were their
several "young ladies," who were re-
quested to leave because of their re-
semblance to men.
Professor Reeves Improves
*Prof. Jesse S. Reeves, of the po-
litical science department, who has
been ill for see.ral days, is rapidly
recovering.

)Ju lktin

(Special to The Daily)
St. Thomas, Ont., March 24.-Uni-
versity of Michigan track team show-
ed evidences of prime condition here in
readiness for their meet with Cornell
if good health can be judged by ap-
petite. All the men are determined to
win and say that they do their utmost
to bring the Wolverines out on top.
GLEE CLUB TO, PRESENT
PROGRAM, ON MARCH '28
CONCERT INCLUDES MANDOLIN
AND VARSITY QUAR.
TETTE- NUMBERS
"Michigan in Song" 'characterizes
the short and varied concert of the
University Glee club program to be
given Wednesday evening, March 29,
in Hill auditorium.' "Laudes Atque
Carmina,"sung by the club, will open
the concert.
The Varsity quartette, composed of
Westerman, Walser, Dieterle and
Kemp, will offer music of somewhat
lighter type. Westerman is an alum-
nus and former director of the organ-
ization. Thirty mandolins will'furnish
instrumental music.
"Bud" Dieterle, 122M, will sing
"Michigan Memories" and several
popular selections from the Michigan'
Operas. He wil be followed by Tang
and Tavares, Hawaiian musicians.
College melodies will be given by
the Midnight Sons' quartette. Under
the leadership of George. M. Chute,
'22E, the Banj& quintette, with Bruce
A. Davis, '23A, J. Kent Wright, '22D,
Sherod L. Mengel, '24D, and Charles
M. Futch, '23M, will play rhythmic
syncopations of popular music. -
An ensemble interpretation of
Ebel's "Victors" by the instrumental.
and vocal sections of the Glee club
will be the concluding number on the
program.
The ticket sale is under the direc-
tion of the Women's League, the
Boosters' .club and all fraternities.
FRESHMAN ,TRACK MEN
WIN INTERCLASS ME

I

I

SEAERTFI 6 TO 27, WiTHOUT RESERYATI(
EXCEPT 'NO ALLIANCE' DECLARI

BITTER FIGHT ENDS WI
MASSAGE BY FOUR
MARGIN
IRRECONCILABLES
AFTER 33 ROLL
Administration Leaders Ho
Slate of Pacific Pact Con
Before Tonight

has been discussed. As necesity de-
mands, it is expected this branch of
the economics department will expand.
to meet the need.
Graduated from Dartmouth
Professor Day was born in Man-I
chester, N. H., Dec. 7, 1883. He grad-
uated from Dartmouth college with the
degree of B.S. in 1905, receiving his1
A.M. there in 1906. He receivel a
Ph.D. in economics from Harvard in
1909. From 1907 to 1910, with an in-i
terval of one year in which he com-
pleted his work for a doctor's degree,
he was an instructor in economics at1
Dartmouth, leaving there to accept a
similar position at Harvard. In 1913
he became an assistant professor, and
a full professor in 1920. Professor
Day is now serving his third year as
cjairman of the department of econ-
omics at Harvard.
During 1918-1919 Professor Day
served as director of the division of
planning and statistics of the United
States shipping board. He is now a
member of the board of directors-of
the Quarterly' Journal of Economics,
the Review of Economic Statistics, and
the Journal of the American Statistical
association, and has been an important
contributor to these and other sci-
entific publications.
MANUSCRIPTS NEEDED IN
CHIMES STORY CONTEST
FEW CONTRIBUTIONS RECEIVED;
ONLY 10 DAYS LEFT TO
OFFER WORK
The 'Chimes' short story contest
which is to close April 5 cannot be
made a success unless many more
contributions are submitted, accord-
ing to a statement made yesterday by
F. M. Smith, '22, editor of the maga-
zine.
"There are at present only 10 stor-
ies in our hands," he said, "and un-
less this number is greatly increas,
ed, we will give up the contest en-
tirely. However, I hope that we will
find, as has formerly been the case,
that, 90 per cent of the stories are
contributed on the last day of the
contest."
The plan of the editor is to pick out
20 or 30 of the beststories submitted
and send them to the judges, James
Oliver, Curwood, '00, Donal Hamilton
Haines, '09, and Harold Titus, '11. If,
a sufficient number of stories to make
the contest worth while are not re-
ceived no stories will be sent to the
judges and those contributed will be
returned to the writers.
Chimes is offering four prizes in
this contest, $50, $25, $15, and $10, the
stories to be judged on general qual-
ity and suitability for publication. It
was announced that the prize winning

Formal dances will not be given at
the Union on Friday nights in~ the fu-
ture on account of lack of support,
according to an announcement made
by Union officials last night.
Out of the usual allotted number
of 225 only 100 tickets were sold for
the dance last night, while at least
100 more men refused to purchase
tickets after they were informed that
the' dance was to be formal.
With the e ception of two week-
ends when otler attractions of spe
cial interest commanded the atten-
tion of the campus, officials state that
tickets for the informal Saturday
night dances have 'been completely
sold out before the dance. The un-
questionable popularity of the infor-
mal dance as opposed to the formal
affair has influenced the officials to
discontinue the latter altogether.
CHINESE STUDENTS PRESENT
PLAY OF LIFE j, ORIENT-
Social and family life in China was
portrayed in a play given by the Chi-
nese students of the Cosmopolitan
club at their meeting last night in
the Methodist guild house. The ac-
tion of the drama emphasized the
contrast between the old type of
scholar, educated n China, and the
new type, educated in Europe and
America.
Leading parts were played by F. C.
Ling, grad., and S.- M. Ho, grad. The
theme of the play was essentially ro-
mantic, and culminated in a double
wedding.
George Oscar Bowen Is Hono*ed
Nashville, Tenn., March 24.-George
Oscar Bowen, of the University of
Michigan School of Music, was elected
vice-president of the national "music
cfnPlrv en #fl ne a ra vactar_-

Caustic Comment and Conclusions
Concerning Campus Cross - Currents

(Editor's note-The following ar-I
ticle, written by a fifth year student, is
the first of a series of similar articles
which will appear in The Daily from
time to time. It is the contributor's I
intention to take up campus occur-
ences and comment, discussing theme
briefly.)
There was a time, according, to a
local chronicler, when Michigan men
ascended pajama clad from their stud-'
ies to the sleeping quarters on the floor
above by means of an outside rope,
thus demonstrating not only their vir-
ility but their contempt for public op-I
inion, whatever that might be.
-The moral to be derived from this!
and applied to present day customs is
not the significance of the mere act
Itself. Plenty of men could be found
on the campcs who have enough vigor
and ape like ability to perform this
daring feat. The point is that the men
of old were not afraid to say and do as
they felt, wholly disregarding the in-
ferences that might be cast in their
cnectlou. x
- Are They Sincere
4t how about today? How many
men are sincere in what they say in
the ;presence of others? How many
have thA courae tn nEmA nut in +he

open and oppose some measure that
may have some backing in the so-
caUed campus opinion, even though
they sincerely believe, and have reas-
ons for their-belief, that the proposed
subject would be adverse to the best
interests of Michigan? Not many-
most of them would- heartily agree
with the majority of the mob, and then
express their honest views to a few
of like opinion. As a result the small-r
er groups damns the universe for be-
ing out of tune and the larger mob
labels them "bolsheviks.".
In this way the seeds of discontent
are sown.
a II
As the time draws near for spring
parties and festivities the freshmen
make plans for their annual "tradition-
al" orgy on the dance floor. It is sug-
gested that the name "Frolic" be dis-
carded because it implies too much
frivolousness, and the yearlings dub
the fete "prom." "No," shout the
sQphomores, "that name belongs to our
party, you can't violate the traditions
of Michigan by usurping that which
inherently belongs to your superiors."'
And the fuss is on.
Startling Discovery
A Daily editorial writer throws cold
ClIanniuiA an P.a, im n4iS

YEARL1WGS SCORE FIFTY-NINE
POINTS WITH SOPHS TAKING
SECOND HONORS
With 59, points to their credit, the
freshman tracksters took first place in
the annual interclass indoor track
meet held last night in Waterman
gymnasium. The sophomores took'
second honors with 38 points, the Jun-
iors were third with 14 co1fnters and
the seniors recorded but three. The
meet marked the close of the indoor
track season.
The majortly of the men entered in
the finals last eight were from the
freshman class. Because of this, the
1925 team usually placed either second
or third places when they did not take
the lead. Although they took but four
first places while the 1924 men took
five, the freshmen seconds ant, thirds
more than over balanced the sopho-
more, first places.
SUMMARY
. 50 yard dash-Martin, '23, first;
Purdy, '24E, second; Neville, '25, third,
and Maloney, '25, fourth. Time :5 4--
seconds.I
Half mile-Marsh, '25, first; Moore,
'24, second; Morfton, '24E, third, and
Zinn, '25E, fourth. Time 2:05 3-5.
One mile-Corchan, '24E, first; Rear-
ick, '24, second; Nicholson, '25, third,
and Shenefield, '25, fourth. Time 4:42
3-5.
High hurdles (65 yards)-Barth, '24,
first; Higgins, '25, second; Hagger-
ty, '25, third, and Anderson, '24, fourth.
Time 9 seconds.
- Low hurdles (65 yards),-Barth, '24,
first; Higgins, '25, second; Laurence,
'25, third; and Davis, '25, fourth. Time
:8 1-5.,
440 yard dash-Purdy, '24E, first;
Roesser, '25, second; Maloney, '25,
third; ahd Levit, '22E, fourth. Time
:54 3-5. '
Pole vault-Goodspeed, '25, first.
Goodspeed was the only man of the
four entries to appear and after he
(Continued on Page Eight)
Craftsmen's Club Meeting
Craftsmen club members will meet
at 7:30 o'clock tonight at the Masonic
temple, Huron and Main streets, to
consider business matters before the
.11

(Special to The Dam:
Washington, March 24. -
Power Pacific treaty, the
controversy over accompli
the Washington arms confe
ratified by the senate toda
reservations, except the n
declaration proposedby
relations committee andai
President HardiAg.
The final tote of 67 to
senting a margin of four ov
essary two-thirds, was rep
the opponents of ratification
more than 20 unsuccessfu
to qualify senate action b
tions or amendments distast
administration.
12 Democrats Favora
On the deciding roll call
crats voted for the treaty
4 Republicans ,opposed it.
Dying hard, the irreconc
ment, which had opposed
on the ground that it esta
alliance between the Unit
Great Britainl," Japan and'
forced 33 roll calls during0
a half houir session set asic
action on the resolution 6
tion. /
They made their best shc
proposed reservation to inv
powers into Pacific eonfe
cepting their interests; they
36 votes for the proposal t
position.
Accept Reservation, 9
The committee- reservatic
cepted in the end by a vot
2, two attempts to moify
by overwhelming majorite
clared that "the United Sta
stands that under the sta
the preamble or under he
this treaty there is no c
to armed force, no alliance
gation to join in any defe
Although debate was proh
ing the day's session unde
mous consent .agreement,
opponents raised a. point 0
regard to the declaration a
ing the treaty but not a
and'laid the basis for conti
assault -tomorrow when ti
mental treaty defining the
the ,our Power pact com
consideration. ItR is -the h
administration leaders, ho
the supplemental treaty m
fled and all that pertains t
power arrangement cleared
senate calendar before
night.
STATES ORGAN]
FOR POOL
City chairmen for the st
York will meet at 1:15 o'c
in room 304 of the Union'to
structions relative to the-
cation drive for funds to co
Union; swimming pool.
Richard Rowland, '23E s
man, will discuss organia
for New York, and Thomas
'2E, general chairman of
will state the goal of the
and eiplain methods of a
the alumni. The men ha
notified through the mail.
60 state workers are expel
present.
A meeting of Illinois city
has been called by Charle
mer, '23, state chairman, 1
at- 5 o'clock next Tuesday
in the reading room on I
floor of the Union.
CROSS WILL SPE
ON ORIENTA
Prof. H. .R. Cross, of th
department, will speak o
pieces of Chinese and Jap
before the Cosmopolitan c
o'clock tonight in Wesley h
icans are often ignornt o
country's art," remarked
Cross, "but only a very fe
ate what the artistic achie
China and Japan are." V

will be illustrated.
Following the lecture the
a combined social of the
women's chapters of the
tan -'" "'hp ^ ~ r--- '-

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