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March 16, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-03-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN, THURRBDAY MARCH 1 .1922

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Character Portrayal Contributes To
Success Of Players Club Production

"Ui
FIRE

.,. .

PRO2P-
[IAN

l

PERSONS ARE
ADE IDLE BY BLAZE

rney, Declares
to Incend-

I~f

(By Delbert Clarrk
Unusually accurate character por-
trayal, good scenic effects, 'and care-
ful coaching combined to make the pre-
sentation of " "Something to Smile
About" last night at Sarah Caswell
Angellhall by the Players club a real
success.
The play, written by Max Ewing, '24,
S. of M., showed a fine insight into the
twists and quirks of human character,
and was on the whole decidedly ef-
fective. No little credit is due to the
coaching of Mr. George Wilner, of the
public speaking department, whose
painstaking, intelligent work showed
throughout the performance. The play
was supervised by Prof. Roy W. Cow-
den, of the rhetoric department.
Amy Loomis, '22, in the role of
Jane Bowersox. was easily the out-
OPPONINTS HALTs a TV
FIGHT ON TREAT
Administration Leaders Believe Ratt-
ficatIon Is Now
Assured

(By Associated Press)
hicago, March 15.-Investigation of,
cause of the fire which destroyed
lock of office buildings, causing a
s of more than $5,000,000, resulting
he death of one man and rendering
00 others idle was begun tonight
state, city and insurance officials.
he manner in which the flames flar-
out intseveral placesrat the same
ment, the almost incredible rapid-
with which they sped until nothing
smoldering ruins was left of the
ck bounded by South Canal, West
n Buren, South Clinton streets and
st Jackson boulevard caused Shir-
P. High, fire attorney, to announce
"everything pointed to incendiar-

standing figure in the play. Her in-
terpretation of the part showed care-
ful analysis of the character of the
young authoress. Throughout the em-
otional nature of Jane Bowersox was
admirably portrayed, and it is difficult
to imagine any member of the club
better.suited to the role than she.
Catherine Greenough, '23, as Gloria
Nast, was well placed in the part as-
signed her, and handled difficult
speeches and bits of acting with easy
skill.
David Gilchrist, '22, as Paul Bow-
ersox, g6t through a difficult male part
surprisingly well. One might at times
have wished for a little less strain,
a little more ease and naturalness of
speech, but on the whole his role, that
of Jane's husband under strong emo-
tional stress, was well handled.
Dorothy Jeffrey, '24, as Julia Ben-
nett, the simpering, affected, superfle-
ial type of woman, took her part well
but one was impressed by the thought
that she is probably better ftted for a
less affected characterization. Milton
Landy, '23,. as Henry Bennett, took
his few 'lines with ease.
The actual presentatiot of the play
was preceded by a program of about
an hour's duration. Prof. Louis Eich,
of the department of public speaking,
read Galsworthy's "The Little Man,"
and Ruth Werkheiser, .'23, S. of M.,.
sang two solos.
FUTURE RESTSON OPEN
MINDEDNES--RTON
PRESIDENT TELLS EUSINESS MEE
INDIVIDUALISM IUST BE
EIAINATED ,

S:1 Is,
SA.1E.PROBATION
Original Finding of Advisory Body Not
Altered After Saturday's
Hearing
SENATE COMMITTEE GIVES
ENDORSEMENT TO ACTION
Ater a consideration of the testi-
mony offered -by the Sigma Alpha Ep-
silon fraternity at the hearing held
before the Student Advisory committee
last Saturday, the committee yester-
day took the following action:
"The original recommendation of the
Student Advisory committee in re-
gard to the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fra-
ternity was taken in view of evidence
which indicated violations of the Jun-
for-Hop rules for house-parties as
drawn up by the student committee
governing the Hop. The Student Ad-
visory committee is of the opinion that
sufficient reason has not been given to
cause a change in its reqommenda-

Epans Presents
.Recital Today
Harry Russell Evans will give the
next recital in the Twilight organ
series at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon
in Hill auditorium. His program con-
tains several numbers previously
rendered due to numerous requests
for their repetition.
The complete program ,will be as
follows:
Pomp and Circumstance, Op. 39,
No. 1 .....................E~a
Berceuse in D flat ........Dickinson
Song of Sorrow ...............Nevin
Sonata in D minor, Opus 42....
. -- -..........-..--- -- Guilmiant
Largo e maestoso - Allegro
A Song 'of India (from the Leg-
end "Sadko") Rimsky-Korsakow
Lamentation.............Guimant
NEW CO~lTTE

Speeches,
Will

Songs and Va
Be Sent Thro
United States

iM I CHIGAN
RADIO POo
SET FOR
DETROIT NEWS AR
, UAL REUNION F'
SITY Al
PRESIDENT BU
GIVE SHORT

Michigap alumni th
United States will be a
contact with their Univ
urday, April 29, when
News radio broadcastit
put on a. "Michigan Ni
starting at 8 o'clock in
The program will i
talks by President Mai
ton, Coach Fielding H.
James O. Murfin, Dear
Cooley, of the engine
Duke Dunne, captain of
ball team, Paul Goebel
of the 1922 team. Er

FINAL. VOTE EXPECTED
TO TAKE PLACE

FRIDAY

Use 100 Lines of Hose
The first alarm was turned in at
12:50 o'clock in the morning, but with
52 engines companies playing more
than 100 lines of hose on the flames it
was not until four hours after the re-
ceipt of the first alarm that the fire
was brought under control.
The largest structure burned was
the "fire proof" Burlington buliding.
Tonight, the walls still stood intact
but its 15 stories of windows' stared
like sightless eyes over the scene of
desolation, for the contents had been
destroyed by a 'heat so intent that
glass from the windows had melted.
Burlington Records Lost
The structure housed the headquart-
ers of the Chicago, Burlington and
Quincy railroad and all of the records
of the operating, engineering and legal
and executive departments were de-
stroyed.
Officials of the board of underwrit-
ers said the fire was the most disas-
trouA since the great fire of 1871..
No Skyscraper Fireproof
The fire in the Burlington building
was declared to show that no sky-
scraper is free from fire dgnger and
that the moden fire department is
practically helpless against a blazea
that gains full headway in the .upper
floors of a tall building.
In an effort to fix responsibility for"
the fire, a former police department
employee was questioned after W. T.
Schiff, vice-preseident of Schaffer and
company, whose plans were destroy-
ed, said that the man had written him
a threatening letter. The flames were
first observed in the vicinity of the
Schaffer plant. The man was later re-
leased.

(By Associated Press)
Washington, 'March 16-Opponents
of the Four Power Pacific treaty in
the senate today abandoned all plane
for a profound fight against ratifica-
tion and attempted a unanimous con-
sent agreement to limit debate and to
take a final vote on Friday, March 24.
The agreement which was hailed by
administration leaders as a certain in-
dication that ratification is assured,
was proposed on the senate floor aft-
er a series of conferences among the
various senate elements, and was ac-
cepted virtually without debate.
It provides that no further reserva-
tions or amendments shall be voted on,
until next Thursday, that speeches on{
the treaty shall be limited to one hour
and those on reservations to 30 min-.
utes each beginning on Wednesday
and that final vote shall be taken with-
out debate as soon as the senate con-'
venes on the following Friday.
Negotiations to bring the ratifica-
tions fight to an end began after the
senate had refused for the third time
to amend the treaty so that outside
powers would be called into consulta-
tion when any specific controversy
touched their interests. An amend-
ment for that purpose + in a form
slightly different from the two voted
down yesterday was presented by Sen-
ator Pittman, Democrat, Utah, and
was defeated 28 to 50 with the divi-
sion of strength virtually coinciding
with party lines.
Running debate developed over the
amendment of the treaty generally.
FREHL MEN IAVE PROMT1 fi ,15 EP T
ICKE LTS, IS REPORT

Explains Action
In view of the type of publicity
which the commit ee's original meas-
ure has received the following state-
ment was issued, after the above ac-
tion- had been taken:
"The Student Advisory committee
wishes to disclaim all responsibility'
for promiscuous statements to the ef-:
fect that there was a so-called
"drunken" party at the Sigma Alpha
Epsilon house on Saturday evening,
Feb. 11. It is not the opinion of the
committee that such an unorderly con-
dition existed. I fact, the commit-
tee particularly desires to avoid cast-
ing the slightest reflection upop the
character or behavior of the ladies
present and the committee further be-
lieves that the personal conduct of
their escorts was entirely above re-
proach.

I

MRS. F. N. SCOTT
BURIED YESTERDAY
Funeral services for Mrs. F. N.
Scott were held at 3:30 o'clock yes-
terday afte'noon at tlke home, 538
Church street. Rev. Henry Tatlock of-
ficiated. Burial was in Forest Hill
cemetery. Mrs. Scott was graduated
from the University in 1884, and was
married to Professor Scott in 1887.
Offices of all student publications
were closed from 3 to 4 o'clock yester-
day afternoon and all rhetoric classes
were suspended during the funeral.
Research Club Meets
The Research club held its regular
monthly meeting at 8 o'clock iast
night in the histological laboratory.
Papers were read by Prof. C. 0. Sauer,
of the geology department, on "A
Study in the Utilization of the Cut-
Over Land" in Michigan," and by Prof.
W. L. Badger, of the chemistry depart-
ment, on "The Theory of the Multiple
Effect Evaporator."

Wants' Agency to Supplem'ent Work
'Deans of Students and Ad-
Tisory Body

of

UNDERCLASS CONDUCT COMMIT.
TEE TAKES STEPS TO PRE-
VENT THEIR USE
Reports that' freshmen have receiv-
ed tickets to the Soph Prom and the
planning to attend that function were
brought before the Underclass Con-
duct committee at the meetink held
last night at the Union. The commit-
tee outlined plans whereby such fresh-
men will be prevented from attending
the Prom but no definite action was
undertaken at this time. More data
will be collected and the subject
brought up. at the next meeting of the
committee.'
According to the information receiv-
ed, the freshmen obtained the tickets
from sophomores who had no inten-
tion of attending the Prom when they
purchased them. In such cases the
committee holds the sophomores
equally culpable with the freshmen. As
there are several hundred sophomores
who could not attend their class func-
tion because of a lack of tickets, thi
action of the freshmen is considered
a serious offense.
BABST, '93, WRITES ARTICLE
FOR THIS WEEK'S ALUMNUS
"Back in the Nineties -- Spme Rem-
iniscences," by EarlnD. Babst, '93, is the
leading article in this week's issue of
the Alumnus, iwhibh will be mailed to-
day. The article was primarily writ-
ten for Chimes but it is reproducedr
here with variations.
Other articles which are given prom-
inent place are on the future develop-
ment of Ann Arbor as seen by ' the
Olmsted Brothers, landscape archi-
tects; and on the new Wesley hall. A
review of the basketball season is al-
so published.

"Open minedness, public minded-
ness, and world mindedness are the
great marks of citizenship upon.whiclb
the future America must rest," said
President Marion L. Burton in his ad-
dress on "The Marks of a/Citizen" de-
.livered before more than 350 business
men of Ann Arbor at a banquet-at the
Armory given last night by the Cham-
ber of Commerce.
"To correct some of ,the unfortu-
nate tendencies in our citizenship, we
must eliminate individualism-the un-
due emphasis on personal success; we
must give up the shallow optimism,
which, for so long' a time, was a fac-
'tor in American life; and we must
forego our ideal of national isola-
tion,", President Burton declared. "But
there are good factors, too," he said,
"for there is the factor of resourceful-
ness, of inventiveness, and; of deter-
mination. There lies inherent great-
ness in the determination of the Amer-
ican people; and we must remember
and appreciatetheir spirit of Liberty.
"The first real mark of a citizen is
openmindedness, and the individual
must possess a spirit of truth~ level-
headedness, and proportion, if he is
to face the great problems which now
fjce him as a citizen. He must be
open-minded, not empty-minded."
L. A. Butler, superintendent of the
public schools, also spoke upon the
present cosdition acid the building
program of the public schools. Follow-
ing the banquet, the guests were en-
tertained by the Detroit News wireless
concert received over the recently
installed wireless receiving set at the
Armory,
FESTIVAL TICKETS
SELLING RAPIDLY
Larger advance ticket sales than for
any previous May Festival are reported
for this year's six concerts from May
17 to 20, according to Charles A. Sink,
secretary of the School of Music.
Advance reservations will be receiv-
ed not later than 5 o'clock this aft-
ernoon and will be filled in the order'
of their receipt. On Saturday the pub.
lic ticket sale will begin at the School
of Music.
CHANGE IN DINNER
DANCE SCHEDULE
Union dinner dances will be given
only about twice a month now, as the
interest of students in them does not
warrant holding them every week, ac-
cording to George E. Gregory, '22E,
chairman of the dance committee. No
dinner dance will be held tomorrow
Bight, the regular evening for the af-
fair. Announcement will be made in
The Daily later regading the date of
the next dinner dance.
Lieut. Boston Speaks Tonight
'"Construction and planning of Min-
es" will be the topic of Lieutenant
Boston who will speak at 7:30 o'clock
tonight in the Union, at the smoker
of the American Society of Mechanical
engineers.

reach of Regulations
"At the same time the Student Ad-
vis'ory committee is cognizant of a
breach of the Junior-Hop house-party
regulations; namely, rule number
three, which was particularly intended
to apply to transients and "stags.' The
committee has carefully considered
the-'evidence which was lately present-
ed but found it insufficient to impeach
the testimony formerly given.
"Unfortunately, either through a
misunderstanding of the rules or neg-
ligence in their application, violations
did occur within the house at the time
of the party."
- The entire action of the Student
Advisory committee was immediately,
approved by the Senate Committee on
Student Affairs.
Athletes Observ4
Letter Day With,
Real Enthusiasm
Michigan stepped aside and looked
on with respect yesterday when her
athletes, in accordance with the new-
ly founded custom, observed the first
"Letter Day" almost to a man.
"M" sweaters and hats mingled with
class numerals to add a dash of colox
to the more austere garb of the stu-
dent body, and the Matze and Blue was
in evidence everywhere. °
When the Student council set aside
every Wednesday as an official "Letter
Day," there was some doubt as to
whether it would be a success. Simi-
lar attempts had been unsuccessfully
made in past years.
The student body realized that one
of Michigan's oldest traditions. was
passing and the Student council desig-
nated an official. "Letter Day." The
succes of this step was evidenced by
the response yesterday.
"It is a fine thing to observe the
day," Coach Fielding H. Yost declared
yesterday. "I only hope that it will
be continued with as much enthusiasm
in the future."
BROUWER LECTURES
ON CORAL GROWTHS
Prof. H. A. Brouwer, exchange pro-
fessor in geology, delivered the fourth
of a series of lectures on various geo-
logical phases of the earth's surface
in the Natural Science auditorium yes-
terday afternoon. His . subject was
"Coral Reefs and Their Meaning."
Professor Brouwer explained the
growth of coral and the effect of
oceanic. influences upon the upheaval
of the coral reefs. The lecture was
accompanied by stereoptican slides.
An interesting phase was the presen-
tetion of slides indicating the remains
of coral reefs in Michigan.
Prof. Cross Speaks to Rotarians
Prof. A. L. Cross, of the history de-
partment, spoke before the .Rotarians
at their noon luncheon yesterday, de-
scribing his trip to the Society islands.

PROPOSED PLAN OUTLINES
COMPOSITE MEMBERSHIP
Appointment of a new committee to
supplement the work of the Dean of
Students and the Student Advisory
committee may be made as a result
of a recommendation by the deans to
' ie University Senate yesterday.
The committee as planned will be
known as the University committee on
discipline, and its function will be to
act in cases of discipline where stu-
dents from more than one school or
college are involved. It is also suggest-
ed that the committee act on any
'casses which the faculty of any one
college might desire to refer to it.
Each College Represented
The plan of the deans calls for a
composite membership in the new
body. There would be three senior
members, all members of the Senate,
appointed by the President for a three
year term. Each school and college
would also be represented by one fac-
ulty member, who would sit in at the
meetings of the committee only when
cases of students from that particular
school were being considered. The
student body would be represented by
three members appointed by the Pres-
ident on the recommendation of the
Student council and the Student Ad-
visory committee.
'A new University publication, pub-
-ished quarterly, was recommended by
a committee offive, ofwhich Dr.
Frank E. Robbins, assistant to the
President, was chairman. Such a pub-'
lication would be devoted to the inter-
psts of the University in. general and
would run both literary and scientific
articles of recognized merit.
Action Is' Deferred
Although it would be under the di-
rection, of faculty members, and would'
be to a great extent an official publida-
tion,"it wouldnbe expected to pay finan-
cially through supliort from the alum-
ni, according to Dr. Robbins. Action
on the matter was deferred to a later
meeting.
It was pointed out at 'this meeting
that action regarding campaigns on'
the campus for the purpose of raising
money is in the hands of the Commit-'
tee on Student Affairs by yirtue of au-
thority delegated them in such mat-l
ters in December, 1920. Discussion
of this point was raisedas a result of
the recent order forbidding women
students from soliciting Michiganen-
sian subscriptions on the campus.

'the country. It is planned
"Michigan Night" the greE
lege reunion ever attempte
university. Alumni who
been in active touch ith t;
Mater for years will be e
hear the program from of
hundreds of receiving stat:
Coach Yost is of--the op
this reunion should be the
get together affair in the l
Michigan. -
Address National Audi
President Burton will I
message as head : of the I
Judge Heston will address
tional audience for the ali
gent Murfin will talk from
gents' point of view, and C
will tell of Michigan's athlE
The alumni will also be
ed by" "Victors" and "Vary
program will be ended by a
Michigan yells.
Plans Tor Hu
Ilooster1Want
Almost Corn
Plans for the huge banqi
given to the basketball tea;
Boosters' club are almost
according to the Boosters' r
in charge of the affair. Thi
will be held at 6 o'clock '
March 23, at the Armory. It
ed that more than 350 peop]
present,
Coach Fielding H. Yost
toastmaster and Prpf. R. W.
the Law school, will be on(
speakers. It is expected tha
M. Wenley, of the philosoph
ment, will also speak. Mr. C
ham will deliver a talk,' rer
the town Boosters and musi
furnished by Kennedy's or
Tickets will be distribu
week to all the honorary so
the campus for sale to th,
bers, while town Boosters a
persons interested may obta:
Graham's bookstore within
days.

tai,
time
Carl
track

sity band,
Mandolin a
tire progra
two hours
over the L
radio set i

son,

DBATING EA1 LAVS
TOYFORWICNN
RUSH,) GLASGOW, GREENBAUM
AND McFARLAND TO UPHOLD
NEGATIVE
Members of the Varsity' debating
team who will present the negative
sidei of the proposition "Resolved:
That the debts due the United States
from her allies in the World war
should be cancelled" in opposition to
the Wisconsin debaters on Friday will
leave today for Madison, accompanied
by Prof. R. D. T: Hollister, of the
public speaking department.
The speakers taking the trip are:
0. W. Rush, '22, president of the Ora-
torical association, J. G. Glasgow, '23,
and F. A. Greenbaum, '22, witlh Ross:
A. McFarland, '23, as' alternate. Prof.
F. M. Rarig, of the public speaking
department of the University of Min-
nesota, will act as judge for the con-
test.
While the debate is in progress at
Madison Friday night the Varsity
team representing the affirmative side
of the same proposition will meet a
team from the University of Illinois in
Hil audirium

7
J
i
l
I

1)OW INELIGIBLE
RESIGNS POSI
Douglas J. Dow, '22E, has
from the chairmanship of the
Advisory committee, it was
ed at the meeting of that be
day. Dow received seven' hol
complete and three condition
last semester's work, which m
ineligible for student activitie
Richard Rowland, '23E1, als
ed from the committee at.this
to ineligibility. He was giv
hours of unsatisfactory grad
end of the first semester.,
Radiophones Catch Local 4
Radiophone owners within
of 50 miles of Ann Arbor weu
hear the Dux and Hnherman

TIVE TEAM
nsin on Friday
-J. B. Glasgow,
im, '22, O. W.

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