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March 12, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"o w"" never played a waltz during the four
years he had been in the Union Or-
n Union Party chestra. One encore would have
Casion been a bigger fraction of the music
than my partner and I were of the
Daily: crowd, so I withdrew my request and
ce. May I tell we went home.
ned as follows: Dances Much Changed
ent I used to I am not prone to lament the pleas-
I even helped ures of youth, and I shall not try to
s of the grad- ,reverse the process of time. Certain-
hie new dances ly I do not accuse the present of being
t out, and I worse than the past because it is dif-
e in a long ferent. But the passage of 50 years
visited at our has made no greater change than it
iking of some- has made in our dancing. What would
o I went over Mr. Fezziwig have thought of it, I
ticket for one wonder, and Mrs. Fezziwig, coming
night parties. into their warehouse dancing room,
long to a par- "one vast substantial smile," people
an at the desk, who "would dance, and had no notice
ild play some of walking?" That smile would have
ny dollar, and vanished, I fancy, and Mrs. Fezziwig
let us in. We would have been dismayed, if not dis-
and watched gusted. And Mr. Fezziwig, who "cut,
watched them cut so deftly that he might have been
aited for that said to wink with his legs?" He
would have expected dancing people
Io to be merry.
When Jean Valjean journeyed to
tee I shouldn't Arras to make his confession he found
the court sitting in a room which
Hance dancing..showed the marks of use and time,
g we used to unkempt and dingy. But that room
ng; and all ex- had witnessesd a long human strug-
never varied. gle for justice, and ,from its use the
partners. If plac had taken on a certain dignity
cing daffodils even majesty. The great room at the
s.ig daodiUnion gains nothing from its uses.
s. It wasn't Rather there fell upon the dancers a
suggests.trereflection of . its own beauty, which
ast to my pre- was the only beauty the pierformance
was funereal.
R., ;+1nn-_possessed.,.

would leave undone any task in the
University that, would later on in life
contribute to his delinquency and
failure. Each curriculum offered by
the University has a certain number
of fundamental subjects that must be
mastered thoroughly by the success-
ful student. Otherwise his progress
is seriously hampered.
It is in this sense that we want all
students to appreciate profoundly that
an active, vigorous and harmoniously
developed body is the all important
fundamental to success in life. No
student student who expects to be a
leader and render real serice to man-
kind, can afford to neglect this funda-
mental. Stoop shoulders, the flat,
hollow chest, the sloven walk and the,
careless posture are serious liabilities.
They are heavy drag loads that hold
one back in the great race of life.
Neglect Means Decay
Again, neglect of the body means
retrogression and degeneration of its
tissues-early senility and decay. In
the strenuous battle of life a time
comes in the experience of everyone
when a sound body is the last great
issue. It is the crisis. If one has
not the strength to "put himself
across," then someone else who has
not neglected his body will forge
ahead and "grab" that success.
Therefore, every student should get
the health habit early. Consult the
students' Health service with a 'view
of correcting refects. Focal infection
such as decayed teeth, bad tonsils,
etc., will interfere seriously with
your work. Learn the important
things about nutrition.
Daily Exercise Advised
Every student should know the
food requirements for his best wel-
fare. At least one hour daily should
be spent out of doors. Malge a prac-
tice of doing Camp's "Daily Dozen"
exercises each morning upon arising.
It takes about 10 minutes.
Consult the department of physical
education with a view of "straighten-
ingup" and correcting those defects
in posture. Learn toa stand and walk
like a rearl soldier. In other words,
improve your personality, for it plays
an estimable role in life.

COMPLETE UXMER CATALOGUE
TO BE DISTRIBUTED MARCH 25
Complete unabridged - announce-
ments of courses and information rel-
ative to the Summer session will be
out on March 25, according to E. H.
Kraus, Dean of the Summer session.
An abridged announcement was re-
leased some time ago as an aid to the
students in making their selections of
courses to be taken the second semes-
ter.
Besides containing a complete and
exhaustive description of all the
courses offered with the professors
and instructors in charge, this an-
nouncement will contain all informa-
tion concerning registration and fees.

999 T4

Now 35WC
Every Passenger
Against Accid

OUR GARAGE IS NEW

OUR POLICY IS SERVICE

Car,

Washing aSpecia

LET US GIVE YOUR CAR
ITS SPRING WASHING

t

But it look
z didn't begin
we shouldn't

r we encountered a
artner hesitated, or
.ght not to say she
even front position.
lance one didn't hold
front of him, with no
It. wasn't, done. And
of example, we
ether. So we prof.
lighttransverse and
isnlacementL aiid it

W. W. SLEATOR.
THE UNIVERSITY'S
COMMON HEALTH
Forning Health Habits
Leadership in the various interests
and activities of life is precisely what
the University desires of all its
products. Success, service and lead-
ership are the genuine ideals of all
worthy students. No earnest student

REPAIRING

STOR)

PHONE 1368

504 E.
.

rv

7 I !r rer W ry 1 ,.. n nn4l w4 Y 1

7

the

-t

n AtsThe f

F V~

8 CAE
1:30 -

TODAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

7:00 and

; ,

What Would You Do

OWNS
SCHOICK

-

-If You

' -.-

Suppose You-
were only a timid bachelor?
Suppose you'd shuffled along thru life with a thousand
hopes, desires and ambitions-and never had found the nerve
to do what you wished? -Never won a fight? Never had loved
a' lady? Never had any fun?
AND THEN
FOR 24
HOURS
Suppose some rash and battling spirit, darting down from
the blue, slipped under your vest and changed your nature
entirely?
Changed you into a roaring devil-may-care buckaroo-a
fighting, loving, clean-'em-up, dauntless critter, all set to
sweep through your town like a hurricane?
f

! Special Added Attraction

GADE
ING SOON

MACKSENNETT

Presents

Ben

Turpin

.

{" '"~
"t"i'L -
-.',,
.
r f.

SALE

T X-

ren
to

i

r~a

ai IN

I.

/.

you smile at lovable,
old
Theo. Bender,'
will recall, perhaps,
eone you once knew.

Ben Turpin escapes bigamy by an eyelash.
Ben Turpin's peculiar focal balance leads him to
a golf course when he wanted to go to a baseball
game. Mashie in hand, Ben makes big dent on
sweet girl's emotions trying to find the authentic
golf ball which he distinctly saw twice with both
eyes.

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