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March 11, 1922 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-03-11

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1

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Sat

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGIN, SATURDAY, MARCH 11, 1922 PRIC

C

[ Group Discussions, Modeled After
Oxford Plan, Will Begin Next Week
Group discussions, modeled on the of the speakers to a far greater ex-
Oxford .discussion} group plan, will be tent than they are able to express
started next week by the Union. The themselves in a class room.
universal approbation given the idea All initiative is going to rest with
by the student body and the faculty the students, the committee being
shortly before the close of the last only their executive body. Procedure
D N semester led the Union to decide to in scheduling a meeting will be as
initiate the idea here. The reception follows: When 10 or 12 students peti-
committee, of which James G. Frey, tion the committee for a speaker, the
'22,. is chairman, will be the executive committee will secure the speaker,
A body through which the students will make arrangements for the room, and
make their wants known. will fix the tim of meeting at any,
Y 20 The purpose of the plan is to make hour of the day until midnight, ac-
available for informal discussion on cording to the most convenient time.
[modie any subject, members of the faculty, For their own good, groups should
g University officials, athletic coaches be limited to 10, students. In order to
and business men, with ,whom small check up on the good faith of the
numbers of students can come in in- petitioners, the names of those pres-
timate and direct contact, similar to ent at the meeting will be reported
f the a meeting in a private home. The to find out whether all petitioners have
ing in discussions will be informal, and the attended:
Stock, talks are expected to be such as to Faculty members and others have
phony utilize the experiences and qualities expressed their hearty accord with

I ~

OPER.
EN MA
"A Psal
Leading

conductor o
Union, work
Frederick
Chicago Sym

eries of six concerts
n at this year's May
0 20.
give promise of
urpassing those of
Among the larger
being worked on
ra" by Wolf Farra-I
Rhapsody" by Fred-
ctor of the Chicago
ra, and Wagner's

Chorus Parts by Choral Union
he chorus parts in all these works
be given by the Choral union,
:h has :been working under Earl
aoore since the first of the school
* in preparation for thp May Fes-
revious announcement has been
.e of the soloists secured and de-
id reports of their lives and work
be made during the pre-festival
on. .
he complete festival programs as
planned are as follows:
rat concert, Wednesday evening,
17. Soloist, Lucien Muratore,
r; Chicago Symphony orchestra,
lerick Stock, condctor Overture,
demic Festival, Opus 80 (Brahms);
, 'Vers d'Ossian from Werther
ssenet); Suite for Orchestra, Opus
(Dohnanyi); Ballet from Le Roi
(Lale); Ballade, Tam O'Shanter
ld'wick); aria, Flower song from
nen (Bizet) ; Symphonic Poem,
2, Tasso, Lamento e Trionfo
zt)
wrkhurst, Werrenrath to Appear
'cond concert, Thursday evening,
18. Soloists: Adele Parkhurst,
ano, Reinald Warrenratk bari-
; the Chicago Symphony orches-
the Choral union; Frederick
k and Earl V. Moore, conductors.
:ession of the Knights of the Holy
1, from Parsifal (Wagner); Tone
n, Death and Transfiguration,
a 25, (Strauss); La Vita Nuova
lf-Ferrari).
Atr concert, Friday afternoon,
18. Soloist, Kathryn Meisle, con-
0; Phildren's Chorus, George
r Bowen, conductor. Fisherman's
er (Myrberg); Gay Lierel (Wahl-
t); aria, Una Voce Poco Fa from
>er of Seville (Rossini); Shepherd
he Hills (Madsen); The Minuet
WOrt; EnglishSogs; By a Lone-
orest Pathway (Charles T. Grif-
Dirge (Horace , Johnson), The
e in the Garden (Emerson Whit-
e), Where the West Begins
nk La Forge); The Song of
ng (Carl Busch); O Don Fatale
t Don Carlos (Verdi); April Folk
tch); Evening Bells (Abt).
Irth concert, Friday evening,
19. Soloists: Frieda Hempel, so-
.o, Riccardo Martin, tenor; the
'al- union, the Chicago Symphony
estra, Frederick Stock, conductor;
-ture Liebesfruhling (Gei r g e
mann); A Psalmodic Rhapsody
ck); aria, Non Mi Dir, from Don
anni (Mozart) ; S y m p h o nic
n, No. 1 Le Rouet d'Omihale
at-Saens); aria, Care Nome, from
letto (Verdi); Concert Waltz, No.
Major (Glazounow); aria, Ahi,
Giune, from La Sonneambula
Hlni); Midsummer Wake, Swed-
khapsody (Afen)).
Piano Soloist Coming
fth concert, Saturday afternoon,
20. Soloist: William Bachaus,
st; The Chicago Symphony or-
tra, Frederick Stock, director.
ture to Benvenuto Cellini (Ber-
; Symphony, No. 2, E minor,
s 27, (Rachmininow); piano con-
> (to be announced).
cth concert, Saturday evening,
20. Tannhauser (in English)1
gner). Soloists: Florence Easton
Adele Parkhurst, sopranos; Mar-
te Matzpnauer, contralto; Riccar-
lartin, tenor, Carl Schlegel, bari-
; Rollin Pease, bass; The Chicago
phony orchestra, the Choral union,
.erick Stock, conductor.
Tap Room Entertainment
A. Patt, '23, and A. H. Hol4en,

350 REWARD OFF ERED
FOR CLUE TO VANDALS
UNION OFFICIALS TAKE ACTIONi
AFTER RECEIVER IS CUT
FROM IPHONE
Property destruction at the Union
reached it culmination yesterday
afternoon so far as officials are con-
cerned when Homer Heath, general
manager, offered a reward of $50 for
the apprehension of the guilty par-
ties. The action came after it was
discovered that at 4:30 o'clock some-
one cut off a telephone receiver in
one of the booths on the first floor
and walked away with it.
Recently a set of framed house rules
were.torn down from the wall of the
side entrance. The third floor also
bears evidence of the work of these
men when furniture was destroyed
and a large hole burned in a chair, aft-
er the lock on a door had been
forced.
The reward will be a standing prop-
osition for any information leading
to the apprehension- of the guilty par-
ties. Mr. Heath, should be notified
at once on the obtaining of informa-
tion. "It is a shame to see certain
Michigan students wantonly destroy-
ing property which was made possi-
ble by the sacrifice of Michigan men
of today, and alumni," said Mr. Heath
yesterday. "It is their own building
in which these depredations are being
committed, and to do these acts is the
'equivalent of stealing from every man
on the campus. We are out to catch
the guilty parties, and we mean to do
it by strict measures."
FORMER GOVEROR IILL
ADDRESS fERHRIS CLUB
FERRIS TO BE ,GUEST OF HONOR,
AT ANNUAL BANQUET
TONIGHT
Wodbridge N. Ferrig, governor ofN
the state of Michigan from 1913 to
1916, will be the guest of honor at
the sixteenth annual banquet of the
Ferris Institute club to be held at 6:30
o'clock tonight in the parlors of the
Congregational churoh. Preceding the
banquet a reception will be given for
Mr. Ferris, commencing at 5 o'clock.
The Ferris Institute club, composed
of men and 'women on the campus
from Ferris institute, consists of 100
members.,
The program will start with a solo
by Murza V. Mann, '22Ed. A Ferris
alumnae will give a short address,
and V. E. Crossley, '2lEd., will speak.
Prof. Jesse Crandall, of the music'de-
partment of Ypsilanti Normal college,
will render an instrumental solo, and
Mrs. Crandall will deliver a vocal
solo.
"The Obligation to the Educated" is
the topic which Prof. William A.
Frayer, of the history department, will
discuss. The address by former Gov-
ernor Ferris will conclude the pro-
gram.
ORDER BLANKS FOR SENIOR
LIT PROGRAMS ARE SENT OUT
Order blanks for the senior lit pro-
grams were sent out Friday. The
price of the leather covered program
is 60 cents, and that of the announce-
ment card 10 cents. March 20 is the
last day on which the committee will
receive applications.'
All seniors who do not receive the
blanks will be given an opportunity
to place their orders on Tuesday and
Thursday afternoons of next' week in
the main corridor of University hall.
The committee emphasizes the fact that
the invitation card is, In reality, an
announcement, and does not imply in-

the plan, and express their desire to
meet the students on such a basis.
The organization is now perfected,
and all that remains is for groups of
students to petition the committee for
speakers. . The first step is to ad-
dress communications to the discus-
sion group committee at the Union.
- y_-
Sigma Delta Ph
Presents Play
" The Golden Doom," a one-act play
by Lord Dunsany, was creditably pre-
sented by members of Sigma Delta
Phi, honorary. oratorical fraternity, at
the Women's league party yesterday
afternoon, in spite of the fat that one
of the leads was unable to be there,
Isabel Kemp, '22, took the part of the
Boy in the place of Esther Welty, '23.
More than ordinary praise is due to
the cast because of its success in por-
traying the unusual rgles of the play.
All members of the cast had appeared
before in campus dramatic activities.
Constance Wood, '23, and Archibald
MacDonald, '25, of the Players club
workshop, co-operated with Sigma
Delta Phi, making possible the unus-
ual scenic effects.
Mrs. T. E. Rankin -and Mrs. W. A.
Frayer, assisted by the girls of
Ritze and Shauman house, served tea
in the parlors afterward. Helen New-
berry residence orchestra furnished
music for dancing.
HYDE IS HEADLINER
ON MIMES PROGRAM
Burton Hyde, '25M, playing one of
,the biggest marinbaphones in the world
is one of the headliners on the vaude-
vill-picture program to be given at 8
o'clock tonight in the Mimes theater,
Lauren B. Stokesberry, '24, will appear
in a Jewish impersonation act, while
W. W. Ottaway, 23, is the principal in
an act entitled "Patter and Song."
Arthur E. Coates, '22E, will give an
exhibition of whistling. In addition to
the appearance of the Union orchestra,
as an additional act, there will be a
two reel Harold Lloyd comedy.
Seats will sell for 35 cents and as
all are reserved, the box office sale
will begin at ,10 o'clock this morning
at the theater. .
UNION RECEIVES SPECIAL3
MUSIC FOR THIS WEEK END ,
.
Special music, just received from
the printers, was played at the Union
dinner dance and at the regular dance
last night, and will be played at the
dance again tonight. Two of the fea-
tured numbers were written by Pierce
Robinson, '23, a member of the or-
chestra. The name of one is "Sob-
bing" while the other, has not yet'
been named. Robinson wrote and or-'
chestrated both pieces. A sexophone
quartette was used as a novelty or-
chestra combination. Some of the
numbers that were played were: "Lov-
ed and Lost," "Song of India," "Play1
That Song of India Again," "Goodbye,
Shanghai," "Lo-la-lo," and "After the
Rain."
UNION TO OFFER TRAINING
IN ORCHESTRA LEADERSHIP
To train leaders for orchestras, it
was announced yesterday at the Union
that one-half hour of every weekly
rehearsal of the Union orchestra
would be given for a conductor's
school, in which one student will have
charge of the direction of the orches-
tra. Captain Wilson,. leader of the
Varsity band, will instruct, beginning
next week. Anyone interested in this
work, regardless of whether member-
ship is held in the Union orchestra,
may take this training by conferring
with Carlton Peirce, '24M, chairman
of the Union music committee, at
4:30 o'clock on Mondays or Fridays
hI ,nn n QfQR n h 'TT,4,n

TREATY PPO NENTS
PRESS ATTACK ON
PACT NE6OTIATION
DECLARE AMERICAN DELEGATION
GAVE OUT MISLEADING
REPORTS
SENATOR PUTS BLAME
ON SECRETARY HUGHES
Lodge Says Alleged Denials are "In.
conceivable"; Charge Causes
_ Flurry
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 10. -- Pressing
their attack on the manner in which
the four power Pacific treaty was ne-
gotiated, the treaty opponents declar-
ed on the senate floor today that the
American delegation to the arms con-
ference not only concealed knowledge
of the negotiations from the public,
but was responsible for the diss m-
ination of misleading reports concern-
ing them.;
Arkansas Senator Makes Charges
At the time when announcements of
the treaty's conclusion was "immin-
ent" Secretary Hughes, it was assert-
ed by Senator Robinson, Democrat, .
Arkansas, told newspaper correspond-
ents that he had no knowledge of any
such project. As a result, the Ark-
ansas senator declared the press was'
inaccurately informed and correspond-
ents assigned to the conference suffer-
ed professionally because they placed'
reliance, on what Mr.' Hughes told
them.'
That the secretary of state had made
such denials was characterized by
Senator Lodge, Republican, Massa-
chusetts another members of the
American delegation, as "inconceiv-
able." Mr. Lodge declared that a pro-
ject for a Pacific concord had been dis-
cussed by him with Mr. Hughes before
the conference began.
Trncte Agreed To
Senator Robinson's charge was made
during a brief flurry of debate just be-
fore the treaty was laid aside for the
day to give right of way to a judiciary
bill. At first the administration lead-.
ers had opposed interrupton of the
treaty discussion to takteup the 'bill, t
but so many senators asked for more
time to prepare their speeches that a
truce was agreed to. Senator Lodge
announced, however, that tomorrow he
would insist that the senate reach a
vote on the first of the proposed res-
ervations.
ARMY OFFICERS WILL
ATTEND0 MILITARY BLL
GUESTS TO INCLUDE COLONE
POWERS AND EDDIE
RICKENBACUER
Prominent military leaders through-
out the state and from other parts of
the country have been invited to at-
tend the second annual Military ball
to be given in Barbour and Waterman
gymnasiums under the auspices of the
campus post of the Veterans of For-
eign Wars on the night of April 28.
The list of guests will include' Col.
P. F. Powers, chief of staff o the 85th
Division, Col. H. D. Styer, at present
in charge of recruiting in the Detroit
district, Eddie Rickenbacker, Ameri-
ca's flying ace, the Michigan state
attorney general, the past commander
of the American legion, and various
state and national officers of the Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars.
The ticket committee, headed by
George M. Lott, '22, announced last

night that the demand ,for applications
had been large, and advised those
who intended to be present at the
ball to get their application blanks
from the Union desk at once. Blanks
will be available on Monday, Tuesday
and Wednesday of next week.
Invitations will be mailed to faculty
members who saw service during the
war, but as the list now in the hands'
of the invitation committee is not
complete, it has announced that all
faculty members who served in any
capacity are cordially invited.
In addition to the military guests,
President Marion L. Burton and Mrs.
Burton, Dr. and Mrs. Louis P. Hall
and several other faculty members
wil be on the program as patrons. A
number of the parents of ex-service
men are also expected.
Pictures Given to Union
Assistance in the decoration of the
musical activities room of the Union
was given yesterday by Alpha Epsilon
Mu, honorary musical fraternity,
through the donation of pictures of
that society, the Varsity band, Glee

APPEAR ON FINAL PROGRAM
PLACE OF-RAISA AND
RIMINI i

IN

Puppets Delight
Mimes Audience
Children and grown-ups alike enjoy-
ed the antics of Tony Sarg's Marion-
ettes at Mimes theater yesterday after-
noon and evening. The Marionettes
appeared here under the auspices of
the Matinee Musicale society.
Thackeray's "Rose in the Ring" was
given in the afternoon, and "Rip Van
Winkle" was presented in the evening.
The "Rose in the Ring" was particular-
ly delightful to the many children
who attended the matinee. The thread
of the story was simple enough to be
followed by the youngsters who were
charmed by the colorful costuming
and stage effects.
Students of the drama found both
performances especially interesting
from a historical standpoint since the
marionettes were one of the most pop-
ular forms of dramatic entertainment
during and following the middle ages.
The work of the puppeteers, who con-
trolled the marionettes from behind
the scenes, was excellent. The meth-
od employed in operating the puppets
was demonstrated to the audience aft-
er the matinee program.
UX U WILL
GIVE CONCERT TUESDAY,

Claire Dux, soprano, and Bronsi-
law Huberman, violinist, will give the
last concert in the Choral Union con-
cert series at 8 o'clo lk Tuesday eve-
ning in Hill auditorium.' These a -
tists will appear instead of Rosa
Raisa and Giacomo Rimini, who were
unable to fulfill their engagement on
that evening.
Miss Dux has established iherself
as oneof the outstanding sopranos
in operatic and concert fields. She made
her debut at the royal opera in Ber-
lin with Enrico Caruso, singing "Mi-
mi" to his " Rudolf q."
On this occasion Oaruso stepped out
of his role to lead the applause for
the young singer after her aria in the
first act - an unusual tribute, and
one which helped to establish Miss
Dux as a leading favorite. .
Subsequently she sang at /Convent
Garden, London, where she won the
admiration of Dame Nellie Melba,Mwo
wrote her a letter of praise and said
that in hearing Miss Dux she had re-
ceived "her' first singing lesson." The
artist's success in opera has been
equaled by her success in recital and
she has proved herself supreme .in
both, on her American tour. ,i
Bronislaw Humerman is a violinist
of Polish ancestry, having been born
in Russian Poland in 1882. He is con-
sidered one of the- world's greatest
masters on the violin. His career #s
one of brilliant achievements and
since his debut in America a couple of
months ago after an absence of 24
years, he has been assigned a posi-
tion among the really great.
Holders of Choral Union tickets will
present coupon 5 reading Raisa, the
concert being given on the same date
as announced for the original attrac-
tion.
LEARNING BY RE IPEITION
RUINS MEMORY, SAYS ORRB
MECHANICAL METHODS 01 TEACH-
ING DO NOT TRAIN MIND
HE ASSERTS
"Until our grade schools can get
away from the old mechanical method
of teaching by repetition, the average
!man will continue to have what is
commonly known as a poor memory,"
stated W. T. Orr, the memory expert,'
who spoke before a large audience in
the Union reading room last night. "It
is a fact that man ordinarily uses but
one per cent -of his egh to ten billion
brain cells, through no understand-
ing correct use of his mental facul-
ties-he is not the master of his mind.
Sensory memory requires no repe-
tition; it is merely learning how to
think in a straight line with the least
effort.
"The third eye," continued Mr. Orr,
"is merely the trained power to vis-
ualize, and consists of hearing a thing
once and having it stay with you. All
mental association goes through one
of three groups, contrast, similarity
or continuity and it is by classification
of material, mental vision and train-
ing that one's memory can become im
proved!"
Mr. Orr gave several demonstra-
tions during the course of his talk
showing the possibilities of trained
memory. It is probable that Mr. Orr
will give a course in Ann Arbor at
some future date at the request of n-

ELY, '240, AM
AS COUR0 T CAPl
STAR CENTER PLAYER
.LEADERSHIP OF WOA
INE FIVE
SELECTION MADE
7 "M" BASKET AL
Captain-Elect Won Four L
Hillsdale Before Entei
Michigan
Gilbert C. Ely, '24D, center
igan's Varsity basketball tea
the past season, was electei
of the 1923 team late Friday
The seven men who won thei
ball letters this season voted
year's captain. Of the seven
finished school this year a
will play their last gamesI
Igan next season.
Captain-elect Ely'came to
from Hillsdal'e college, Hillsd
In the fall of 1920. He had
Hillsdale college for three yi
ing his pre-dent work ther
at Hillsdale, he played bask
one year and was elected c
the team, but did not return
his final year.
Plays End on Football S
Ely distinguished hiniself
athletics and is one of the
letter men from Hillsdale col
played end on the Hillsdale
team during his last year ai
letter in track as a hurdler.
'also awarded a letter in bas
same season.
His basketball training wa
in Pioneer high school, Pkl
where he played for three ye
was captain of the high sch
during his senior year. He
football and baseball and w,
in track meets while in high
Registers 101 oInt
Ely was one of the stella:
in Conference basketball cr
Ing the past season. His per
at the center position was c
able and his ability to sho'
caused much sport gossip.
tered 101 points in Conferen
and stands fourth in the C
rating for individual shootin
He has been chosen on one
All-Conference basketball t
year. 'His; alertness while
court, together with his kee
a basketshooter and floor run
gained him wide favor among
critics. He played full time
Michigan's games throughout
sou.
Ely expects to report to Co
en next week for pratice for
sity team. He plays' infield
FACFLTY WOMEN'S CLUB
ATHLETIC SECTION l
Hike Planned by Nembers
Afternoon; to Start at H
of krs. Curtis
A meeting of the athletic
the Faculty Women's club
Thursday afternoon at 3 o'ck
Barbour gymnasium, for el
officers and formation of plai
ture activities. Mrs. R. H. C
elected chairman of' the se
Mrs. H. N. Schmitt secretary
was planned for this afteri
hikers leaving Mrs. Curtis' 1
,East Huron street at 3 .o'c
party will return at 4;30 to
tis home where tea will b
The proposed route of the
around by the island, out
road, and home by some sec:

road.
In case of inclemency of
the section will meet at the s
at Mrs. Curtis' home wher
games will be played and a d
held concerning future activi
members of the Faculty Won
who' have not signed up for
tion are cordially invited to
Will Discuss College Const
Proposals for a college co
in accordance with the prix
the new college movement
being fostered by numerous
throughout the country wil
sented for discussion at the
of the faculty Forum at 7:3
Monday, March 13, in the Na
ence auditorium.
TJIE DAL
Students wishing to try ou
writers on The Daily bushi
should see A. 3. Parker be
and 19 n'clor in The nailv

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