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March 10, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-03-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

to women one the same

d suI-
'ms as1

IISONERS FACE
DEATH IN RUSSIA1

CURTISS ON
IN STRA

'AND
GE CA

TAXI

35 Cents

Passenger Insured
ainst Accident

man if he gain the
his health"?
g lots of good, Pure

are always sure of the best if you
airy products
FROM THE
NN ARBOR DAIRY CD.
PHONE 423
Carry an
eady Fountain Pen

Light
a Fountain Pen.
$1.00

Complete with Battery

Disease and Starvation Menace 200,000
Victims of Soviet Political
Punishment
EX-PRISONERS, FRIENDS AND
CHURCHES ATTEMPT RELIEF
Moscow, March 9.-To prevent the
death by starvation and disease of
200,000 or so men and women in the
various prisons and concentration
camps of Russia, collections are being
taken in the churches by the priests
and about the streets by ex-prisoners
or by friends and relatives of prison-
ers.
Camps Crowded
Despite the amnesty proclamationof
the soviet government, November last,
the - prisons and camps continue
crowded with men and women poit-
ical prisoners whose only crime ap-
pears to have been that they once were
rich or that they fell afoul of old ene-
mies who used their communistic in-
fluence to avenge private grievances.
Conditions hace been foing from bad
to worse since the famine until now
prison means to be practically without
food, colthes, heat or medicine. The
organization known as the Russian po-
litical Red Cross has had its meager
supplies and funs cut off, along with
schools, hospitals and other insttu-
Ytlons R
The people in the famine region are
i a paradise compared to those who
are denied their liberty and all means
of obtainifig food.
Eat Like Animals
In the camps of Novospaski and
Pokrofsky, near Moscow, to the cer-
tain knowledge of The Associated
Press correspondent, the prisoners are
reduced to eating bits of refuse, like
hungry animals. The best that i's
served them is greasy hot water called
soup and pieces of black bread.
Once such people as these get into
prison they stay there almost auto-
matically because they are f no spe-
cial political importance in present-
4ay Soviet Russia.
Plans Completed
For Addition To
Botany Gardens
Plans for the addition to the botan-
ical gardens on Packard street and
for .the gardener's home, have -been re-
ceived by Prof. H. H. Bartlett, of the
botany departinen. The additions
were approved at the last meeting
of the Board of Regents.
A propagation house is to be added
to the/west end of the present build-
ing. ;It will be used for the purpose
of starting seeds and cuttings and is
to be 30 by 50 feet.
t Completed plans for the botanical
gardens call for eleven greenhouses,
of which this is the fifth. The present
greenhouses, boiler house and labor-
atory building, were constructed in
1915 and 1916. During the years since
.1916 construction has necessarily been
at a standstill, although the work of
the garden has expanded' as originally
contemplated. The crowded condition
resulting has greatly hampered the
work and the new building will tem-
porarily relieve the situation.,
The garden is now recognized, ac-
cording- to rofessor Bartlett, as provid-
ing facilites for advanced teaching
and, search' in plant breeding and
genetics second to none in the coun-
try. In addition it furnishes mater-
ial for the teaching of elementary bot-
anyf onthe campus, and provides dec-
orations for the University hospitals
and other buildings.a

Prof. R. N. Curtiss, assistant direc-
tor of the Observatory, was recently
on the stand in Detroit giving testi-
mony in the Michigan Stamping com-
pany case, started by residents of the
neighborhood who had complained
about the vibrations of their homes.
They claimed that the machinery in
the company's mill caused the tremors.
Professor Curtiss measured the vi-
brations in the mill and, by means of
instruments, determined what machine
it was that was causing the com-
plaints. He then went tothe nearest
house and measured the tremors there,
and found that they were greatly re-
duced.
The case has not as yet been settled,
but the court has given the Michigan
Stamping company a. chance to remove
the cause for complaint.
WILL OFFER FOREIGN TOURS
AND UNIVERSITY COURSES
Groups Will Study at Dijon, Madrid,
and ilexeo City-Will See '
Passion Play
Opportuniities for study in universi-
,ties of foreign countries during the
summer are open to American uni-
versity students this year, according
to Dr. A. J. Armstrong, of Baylor uni-
versity, Waco, Tex. Dr. Armstrong
has previously conducted parties of
students to Europe for general tours,
and this year is planning to take three
parties for special study in modern
languages.
1 The French group will study at
Dijon, the Spanish group at Madrid
and the third party at the University
at Mexico City. On Aug. 1 and 2 all
three divisions of the touring party
will see the Passion Play at Oberam-
mergau. The trip commences June 24
and it will end Sept. 5.
WASHTENAW AND NORTH STATE
STREETS TO BE PAVED SQON
"Wastenaw avenue and North State
street may be paved, and I believe that
it is very probable that Hill street
will also be paved," said City Clerk

asked what the Board of Public w
would do about paying the st:
named by Ann Arbor petitioners.
The Board of Public Works
probably ask paving companies

I
'1

r .. . . :.. ,..
IM nY n nIMM

The Coca-Cola Co.
Atlanta, Ga.

E'WI.

Sport Instep Sadcl

on the
will doing i
for eral aid

l
,.
1

* '.

flat heels.
squared toes

The ne
at

A new Sport Modei
the young fellow v
likes the latest. Sad
across instep and I

Good things
from9dcimes
poured into a
sangle glass
Delicious and
Refreshing

r-

C()eer

bach & Son Co.
E. Liberty Street

ComingSoon
Charles (Chic) Sale
as
Pelee Gear, Jr.
wit of the community
one of the seven distinct
characters he portrays in
"HIS NIBS"
CHIC SALE, foremost
delineator of rural types
on the American stage to-
day, smiles with his char-
acters, never ridicules
them.
Also
Ethel Clayton
in
" Her Own Money"

®

115 SOUTH MAIN STREET

.. .. i ..

A GOOD

IN-VESTMI

BUY

AN

;' ,'
" I , -

I{

I

OYERCO

Langhan) Clothes
Mtade by Leopold, Chicago

I~l

Less 33
fr

sed Moans,

Ippropriately Dressed
ect college men desire.--that's the
ieve when you select a suit here.
)ught of our new clothing depart-
ropiate Clothes for College Men,
we decided.

WADHAMS

T

i i I iii

i..n 4 ww rriir .. ..,.. ,.
+ .iii rrwrY w r r i r.. .rrrr rr, r . - _ . '..

_ .
_ -- __
.
_
_ , -
_ '

.

gham

Clothes

right for us-because they are so obviously approp-
Spruce, upstanding clothes with a wealth of
and yet with an utter absence of exaggeration,
y suits there are
Plain models with a distinctive look; and
Norfork styles that are unusual but not biz-
arre. Checks, plaids, stripes and interesting
novelties.

MURAD
THE TURKISH CIGARETTE

ml, - - UtL
: tS, g i.'

40 to
Come in and See Them All

. titi}

VERY day MURADS
are held higher in the
estimation of the men
who smoke them.
They are the standard of
Taste.
They are 100% pure Turk-.
# ish tobacco-of the finest,
varieties grown..
They never disappoint-

never fail-never change--
You are proud to smoke
them in any company-,on
any occasion.,
They are the largest sell-
ing high - grade cigarette in
the world.
The cigarette smokers of
America DO prefer Quality
to Quantity.

EN &E
iouth University Ave.

W-,

1107

.:An

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