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March 09, 1922 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-03-09

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 9, 1922

PRICE

'JCIL

FAVORS

CONVOCATIO

Eli

,:

WICHIGAN
BUILDINGI
9KE SHAPE'
'ON WORK lfOVES
WAD TOWARD
LETION
SCHOOL >
ANNOUNCED

Dean Jordan Forbids Solicitation
Of Michiganensian Subscriptions
By University Women On Campus

in Clements
ence Inside
Soon
i" is rapidly
a mere ideal
s time passes
im begins to
tions. Every

LIO I.

When the edict was issued yester-
day by Dean Myra B.. Jordan that
women students would not be permit-
ted to continue soliciting subscrip-
tions for the Michiganensian on the
campus because of an official rule,
students, solicitors and the 'Ensian
staff wondered and asked themselves
the whys and wherefore of the- matter.
Dean Jordan declared that when the
campaign for the Womens' League was
begun, a rule was made effective that
restricted women solicitors from cam-
paigning any place but in three 'cam-
pus buildings,, the University library,
Barbour gymnasium and University
hall. Had she been consulted, she
stated, she would not have granted
permission to the women to carry on
the campaign.
No Knowledge of Rule
The editors of the 'Ensian, who had
been contemplating a successful sub-
scription drive to wind up their sales
campaign, said that they had no
knowledge of such a rule when they
secured the services of 16 sororities to
take charge of the campus soliciting.
James G. Frey, '22, managing editor
of the year book, said, "It is the inten-
tion of the editors to abide by the

rules of the University, but still I can
see little difference in having women
canvass on the campus as well as in
the buildings. Last week the Univer-
sity of Minnesota year book's business
staff put on a sales campaign conduct-
ed by women, and they sold more than
4,000 copies. Why can't we do it
here?''
Will Obey Edict
Robert F. Wieneke, '22, business
manager of the 'Ensian, gave it as his
opinon that the staff would obey the
ruling, but that it would result in
much confusion and 'fuse a hurried
change in -the campain plans.
"The women were getting well
started on a good cause when they
were suddenly halted by the interven-
tion of the faculty. I cannot see any
reason why, if a girl can talk to a man
In University hall or in the Library,
she cannot talk to him on the cam-
pus."
Edna Groff, '22, president of the
Women's league, declared that she
knew that the rule had been in ef-
fect, but declined to comment on the
present situation until she had con-
sulted with Dean Jordan. *

U.'S SUEFU SES TO
PARTICIPATE i
GE[NOA 'MEETING
DECLINE SUPREME COUNCIL'S IN-
VITATION TO ECONOMIC r
. j CONFERENCE
FAIL TO AGREE ON
ESSENTIALS, CAUSE

Object to Sitting-In of Soviet
With Other Nations of
World

Russia1

Evans Appears
As Organist At
Recital Today
Iarry Russell Evans 'will give the
weekly Twilight organ recital at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon in Hill auditor-
ium. The public is cordially invited.
Saint-Saens' "Third Rhapsody on
Breton Melodies" will the first number
offered. Saint-Saens, who died Dec.
19, 1921, at the age of 86, was for
many years one of the leading figures
in French music.
"An Elizabethan Idyll," by T. Tertius
Noble, formerly organist of', York
cathedral, and one of. England's fore-
most concert organists, is the next,
number. The composer is at present
organist and choirmaster at St. Thom-
as' church, New York.
Mr. Evans will also play Mendels-
sohn's Sonata in A major, Opus 65, the
third of a series of six epoch-making
works for the oigan. Mendelssohn is
one of the few great composers who
have written for this instrument.
The program will be brought to a
close by Lemmens' "Grand* Fantasia.
in E minor."
IN, IN'SAN DRIVE

RECOMMENDS HI
ONC EACH MU OflISM~

PRESIDENT BURTON
ULTY KNOWN TO
PLAN

AND
FAVO

be-
and
and
as-
few

brings the ainnouncement of
the plans that-will eventually
a the realization.of this ideal,
the meantime construction
es on steadily about the cam-
atest development in the pub-
of plans is the announce-
Dean ,A. S. Whitney, of the
>f Education, of the construc-
the near future of a new Uni-
building to house the School
:ation and of a model high
which will serve as a labora-
r education students.
Library Progressing
on the Clements library is
sing steadily. Stones for the
>f the building are being cut
in place, while a brick;wall
ocess of erection behind this
With the culmination of this
ttention will be turned to the
decorating.
v branch of the tunnel system
ries the light, heat, and power
various buildings about the
has been extended to this site.
ions are made with the main
t leads to Martha Cook dormi-
1 being in readiness for intro-
into the new library.
er the University hospital ad-
tion building nor the dental'
have been neglected. The
on for the former has been
d construction of side walls
ue shortly. The dental addi-
uated behind the present den-
ding, will have a foundation in
y the middle of next week.
lying "on Fast University
our houses remain unsold on
t of land across from the east
the campus. The wrecking of
)perty is in the hands of the
bor Asphalt Construction com-
nd is being carried ahead at a
ace. The ground that will be
ant is to be occupied by a new
building and the engineering
will be received shortly for
tion of the new physics build-
be located where the R. O. T.
k is at present. The contract
let as soon as bids are all in
ly considered.
T MIXER'SATURDAY
aee from 2 to 5 in Barbour
Gymnasium

PRES. BURTON EXPRESSES INTEREST
INl PLAN OFFEEDBYKIRKPATRICK

(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 8.-The United
States government has declined the in-1
vitation to participate in the Genoa,
economic conference. The decision of
the governient was transmitte here
to Senor Ricci, the Italian ambassa-
dor, who, acting for his country and
indirectly for the allied supreme coun-
cil, extended the invitation for Amer-
ican participation.
The position of the American gov-
ernment as set forth in the communi-
cation handed Ambassador Ricci is
that participation by the United States
in any general European economic
conference is impossible at this time,
owing to the complete failure of
European nations, in the view of the.
American government, to adopt prop-
er measures for remedying the rav-
ages of war, and insuring the stabiliza-
tion of economic life.'
It is understood that the American'
government also failed to agree with
the European powers as to the par-
ticipation of Russia, and, in that con-
nection cites the policy of the United
States of non-recognition of the soviet
regime as set forth in the note pf last
March.
EXPECT BIG DEMAND FOR
M IL IAYBALL..TICKETS
APPLICATION BLANKS AVAILABLE
TOMORROW IN UNION
LOBBY

Quota of

500
One

Still Unattained
More Day to
Work

with

Declares Present Policy of University
Government Is at Least
E iicientf
THINKS PRACTICABILITY ON
LARGE SCALE IS DOUBTFUL
"I would like to see Dr. Kirkpat-
rick's plan tried out," was President
Marion L. Burton's comment on the,
JUNIO'R PLAY TICKETS
GDo FAST ON FIRST BAY
Tickets for the Junior Girls' play
sold fast yesterday afternoon when
they were put on sale at the box office
of Hill auditorium. A crowd gathered
early in order to obtain the best seats.
Notwithstan~ding the great demand
a number of good seats remain for all
performances. These tickets will be
sold from 2 to 6 o'clock tomorrow aft-,
ernoon and Saturday afternoon, and
from 9 to 12 o'clock on Saturday morn-
ing.
Senior women may call for their"
complimentary tickets between 1 and
5 o'clock this afternoon at the league
room in University hall.
Fathers of Junior girls will be per-
mitted to attend the play provided they
obtain a certificate from Dean Myra
B. Jordan and present it when they
purchase their tickets.
EXHIBIT LANDSCAPE DESIGNS
IN ALUMNI MEMORIAL HALL
Plans and drawings of various
phases of landscape designing are on
exhibit in the northwest room on the
first floor of Alumni hall.
The exhibit includes a collection of
plans and elevations of various Ital-
ian gardens, notably that of the Villa
Gambria, drawn by C. Lawson, Amer-
ican fellow in landscape architedture
at the American academy in Rome
from 1915 to 1920.
Plans and drawings submitted in the
1921 competitions' for the fellowship
at Rome, which was awarded to Ralph
Griswold, of Cornell university, are
also on exhibit.
Prof. Hopkins Presides at Meeting
Prof. Louis A. Hopkins, professor of
mathematics and secretary of the Col-
leges of Engineering and Architecture,
president Tuesday afternoon at a
meeting of the Council of Church
Boards of Education at Lane hall. Men
prominent in church education from
various parts of the country were here
and many problems of their work were
discussed.:

article by Dr. J. E. Kirkpatrick, of the
political science department, in the;
March issue of Survey. In this arti-
cle Dr. Kirkpatrick advocates greater
democracy in the administration of
collegs and universities, asserting that
for the most part they are autocratic,
and proposes a plan for administration
by committee, with the t faculty and'
student body having a considerable
voice in executive decisions.
"I do not wish to be considered an
authority on the subject," said the
President, "but I do think that such
an experiment would be most interest-
ing, and I would watch it closely.
"The plan of course has its draw-
backs. Everyone will agree that lead-
ership in any organization of impor-
tance is indispensible, and I an of the
impression that the plan proposed
fails to give sufficient consideration
to that point. It is an indisputable'
fact that under the present system one
man or at least a very few individuals
are popularly held responsible for
everything thathoccurs in connection
with the University, often for occur-
rences of which they have no knowl-
edge. But, nevertheless such an at-
titude, unfair as it may be, makes for
greater executive efficiency.
"The ancient Athenians practiced
pure democracy in their municipal
government, and the same has been
true of the Swiss cantons, where a
comparatively small population and
concentration within narrow geo-
graphical limits makes it practicable.
There is a question whether such a
system could be successful on a large
scale, but I would like to see it tried,
and would watch the effort with keen-
est interest."
line Chorus Work
Done In Concert

Application blanks for the second
annual Military ball, given under the1
auspices of the campus post of Veter-
ans of Foreign Wars in Barbour and1
Waterman gymnasiums Friday eve-
ning, April 28, will be available at
the Union desk tomorrow. Due to the1
expected demand for tickets, applica-
tions will also be available on Monday,,
Tuesday and Wednesday of next
week. The general committee 'in
charge of arrangements for the ball
has set the ticket price at $5.- I
Three orchestras will provide the
music of the evening. They are'
White's colored syncopators from Co-
lumbus, 0., Waring's Pittsburg orches-
tra and Kennedy's Ann Arbor orches-
tra. The decorations are to be pro-
vided by the Arts and Crafts company
of Detroit, and will be of a, strictly
military nature, the national colors
playing a leading part in the color
scheme. The 12 booths will represent
the different allied countries and are
to take the form of front line trenches.
The following are the chairmen of
the various committees: general
chairman, Warren Gilbert, '22E; sec-
retary general committee, Hamilton
Cochran, '22; music, John Lawton,
'24; tickets, G. M. Lott, '22; decora-
tions, Major Willis Shippam; pro-
grams, Captain F. W. Hoorn; invita-
tions, G. M. Gale, '23L; refreshments,
N. W. LaRouche, '22; reception, C. W.
Smith, '24L.
Circolo Italiano Hears Cross
Prof. H. R. Cross, of the fine ats
department, gave an illustrated lec-
ture on "A Trip Through Italy," before
the Circolo Italiano in Alumni Memo-
rial hall last night. Professor Cross
delivered the lecture entirely in Ital-
ian and described many of the in-
teresting points from the Alps on
down through Italy. Several selec-
tiones from Italian literature were
given in his talk.

THETA PHI ALPHA AND DELTA
DELTA DELTA TIED FOR LEAD
With the last day of campaigning
here, the Michiganensian still lacks
239 of the 500 subscriptions at which
it aimed. Yesterday's sales netted 121
subscriptions, which, added to Tues-
day's number, gives the grand total to
date of 261. This amount includes
both part paid and paid in full sub-
scriptions.
In spite of many handicaps, the en-
thusiasm of the workers in the cam-
paign does not seem to be diminish-
ed. While the women can no longer
sell on the campus, booths have been
placed in the Library, in University'
hall, and in Barbour gymnasium, at
which teams. are present throughout
the day. Only men will betat the sta-
tions on the campus outside buildings
today.
The high team yesterday was from
the Theta Phi Alpha sorority, whose
total amounted to 25 subscriptions,
while the Chi Omega team turned in
22. *As the tegms now stand Theta
Phi Alpha and Delta Delta Delta are
tied for first place, each having 33
subscriptions. Chi Omega and Kappa
Kappa Gamma each have a total of 30
subscriptions.
The standing of the 16 sororities
participating in the sales campaign
is as follows: Alpha Chi Omega, 23;
Alpha Omicron Pi, 19; Alpha Phi, 0;
Alpha Xi Delta, 12; Chi Omega, 30;
Collegiate Sorosts, 15; Delta Delta
Delta, 33; Delta Gamma, 10; Gamma
Phi Beta, 5; Kappa Alpha =Theta, ;
Kappa Delta, 10; Kappa Kappa Gam-
ma, 30; Mu Phi Epsilon, 6; Pi Beta
Phi, 10; Theta Phi Alpha, 33; and Zeta
Tau Alpha, 19. Aside from the chang-
es in locations, the rules for the com-
-petition remain the same as previ-
ously.
BRADWAY TO SPEAK
AT UNION SUNDAY

WEDNESDAY NAMED I
REGULAR "LETTER DA
Election Arrangements Left Eni
in Hands of Special
Committee
Recommendation that the Con
tee of Deans set aside an 11 o'
hour once each month for a con
tion of the entire University wi
made by a committee appointe
,the Student council. Action fav.
such a gathering was voted on
orably at the meeting of the Sti
council held last night at the U2
Convocation of all the studen
the University at such definitely
ed and regularly periods is highly
ored by President Marion L. B
and other members of the facult
cause of the benefit it would bri
the University as a .whole an(
students individually. The Pres
could address the school on sul
pertinput to its 1 welfare and di
questions of policy.
Big Men Can Be Brought
At the same time, opportunity v
be presented for bringing impc
men of the country to the Univ
as its guests. In this way Mic
could entertain men of national
even international reputation.
The action also recommends thi
students be excused from class
this "hour that they may attend
meeting. The council will co-4p
with the Univerity authorities in
rying out such plans.
Every Wednesday, hereafter, w
known as "Letter Day" through
olution passed by the council
night. On these days all men
have won their letter or class
erals should wear their insignia.
agers' "Ms" are now in outline
so that their letters may 'be d
guished from those of the V
men, and they are asked to wea
letters.
Owe a D.uty
It was brought out at the im
that letter menu owed it as a du
the Universly to wear insignie
that a particular duty devolves
the men to wear them on the dad
aside. The numerous benefits
wil result from such a custom
shown, among which was the cr4
of an example for the younger m
the campus.
Plans for carrying out ele
this spring were left entirely i
hands of the election committee
council and no further action wi
gard to elections will be taken 1
council as a whole at present.
for a drive on the campus for
sian relief were voted on unfa
bly, as such a campaign was di
Inadvisable -at this time.
M'S RECOMMENDEE
FOR 7 BASKETIM

1 avail themselves of
to meet their class-
r which will be given
on in the parlors of

ancing will begin at 2 and,con-
itil 5 o'clock, with Pat Nert-
chestra furnishing the music
occasion. Refreshments, con-
)f punch and wafers, will be
luring the afternoon.
s for the dance have been plac-
tle and may be secured on the
or in classroms. Men's tick-
50 cents and ladies' 25 cents,
tax which is required for such

(By Sidney B. Coats)
Effective chorus work, a "peppy"
quartet, pulsating harmonies by the
Mandolin club, some "mighty good
jazz," and some excellent selections
by Mildred Chase, also soloist, were
the things which made last night's
concert by the Girls' Glee club enjoy-
able for all.
The'club itself, under the, direction
of Nora Crane Hunt, gave four groups
of numbers. From these thee groups,
three numbers, Mary Helen, Brown's
"Nocturne" with violin obligato, Haw-
ley's "Song of the Seasons" and "Good
Night, Good Night Beloved," arranged
by Clifford Page, shone in a class by
themselves.
The finest work on the entire pro-
gram was that of Mildred Chase. She
sings with sympathy and understand-
ing, interpreting the various moods
of "Rain," "A Lullaby" and "Life" as
only one who lives the soggs can.
BULLETIN
Madison, Wis., March 8-Wis-
consin defeated the University
of Chicago here tonight by the
score of 24-17.

LITS NOTICE
bers of the 1922 liter-
vho have not yet paid
dues are urged to do
e. Checks are to be
the class treasurer at
tenaw avenue. Names
its whose dues are yet
now nosted in the reg-

Detroit Alumnus Will Tell . of Real
Estate Opportunities
Judson Bradway, '04, prominent in
Detroit real estate circles, has been
secured on "Real Estate Opportuni-
ties" at a Union meeting at 3 o'clock
Sunday afternoon in the assembly
hall. The address is one regularly
scheduled on the Sunday afternoon
meeting series.
As a real estate dealer in Detroit
for the past 20 years, Mr. Bradway
has seen the population of the city in.
crease from 350,000 to almost ,1,000,-
000, with consequent real estate op-
portunities and problems. He will
discuss opportunities in his field of
work, with special reference to the
viewpoint of the student who is soon
to choose a profession.
Mr. Bradway will be Introduced by
O. W. Rush, '22, member of the Union
Sunday afternoon meetings commit-
tee.

Coach Mather has recommend(
the Board in Control of Athletics
seven members of the Varsity ba
ball squad be awarded "M's" ofr
play this season, while four pl;
have been recommende for A.M.A
,The men approved by the coac
"M's" are: Captain : Rea, Miller,
Birks, Kipke, Paper, and Pearm
Piper, Whitlock, McGregor and
Galley were recommended for
A.M.As. Action on Mather's s
tions will be made by the board
next meeting.
CLAUDE WASHBURN, DAILY
MAKEUP MAN, NOW RETUI
Claude Washburn, Daily lino
and makeup man, reassumed his e
with The Daily last night after
eral days' absence owing to ill
Mr. Washburn has rendered The
faithful service for more than
years, during which time he has
unfailing in the consistency of
work. and in promoting the best
ests of the paper.
THE DAIL)

Mrs. Burton Speaks Before Dames
At a regular meeting of the Mich-
igan Dames held Monday evening in
Barbour gymnasium, Mrs. Mailon L.
Burton spoke of her experiences as a
Dame at Yale, where she organized
the chapter. Following her talk there
was a social hour during which re-
freshments were served.

Senior Play Committee Meets Today
The Senior Girls' play committee
will meet at 4 o'clock today in room
8 of University hall to discuss an im-

There will be a me
outs for the editoria.

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