100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 07, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-03-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


.e

eUniversity
.s.

d to the use for
tor not otherwise
hied tkerein.
ichigan, as second

Bss Building, Maynard Street.
Editorial, 2414.
exceed 300 words, if signed, the signa-
r in print, but as an evidence of faith,
published in The Daily at the discre-
r mailed to The Daily office. Unsigned
no consideration. o manuscript will
incloses postage.
sarily endorse the sentiments expressed-
)RIAL STAFF
ephone 2414
.. BREWSTER P. CAMPBEILL
...... .Joseph A. Bernstein
..... ................Paul Watzel
......... .........J., B. Young
G. P. Overton
M, B. Stahl

nan................... Armstrong Kern
fer E. R. Meiss
or; ............. Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
. ..............George E. Sloan
..Sidney B. Coates
...........George Reindel
........ ............Elizabeth Vickery
................................E. R. Meiss
Assistants
n H. A. Donahue Marion Koch
Dorothy. G. Geltz Robert M. Loeb
H. B. Grundy J. E. Mack
Sadyebeth Heath Kathrine Montgomery
Winona A. Hibbard R. C. Moriarty
Harry D. Hoey , J. F. Pontius
Agnes Holmquist Lillian Scher
H. E,. Howlett R. B. Tarr
Marion Kerr Virginia Tryon.
M. A. Klaver Dorothy Whipple
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
R................VERNON F. HILLERY
..............................A. J. Parker
........................John J. Hamels, Jr.
...................Nathan W. Robertson
.........................Walter K. Scherer
..........................Herold C. Hunt
Assistants

greater feeling of regard for the man whose au-
thority and position he has acknowledged. As Mich-
igan men bare their heads to the notes of "The Yel-
low and Blue", a more profound reverence for
their University is bound to be stirred within them,
than if they had remained covered.
Entirely too little of this sense of r espect is
shown by students towards their campus. Whereas
it should symbolize the heart of the University,
many consider it rather a place to throw cigarette
butts and waste paper. Cutting across lawns is a
prevalent example of the disregard in which stu-
dents hold their campus.1
At present, freshmen are not allowed to smoke
pipes while on University grounds. The rule is
strictly a disciplinary one. But were the freshman/
to be prohibited from any form of smoking while
on the campus, partly in order that the grounds may
be kept cleaner, then the rule would have a far
deeper influence in creating a genuine respect
among first year men for the well-kept appearance
of their campus.
If he must extinguish his cigarette before he steps
onto University grounds, the freshman will begin to
realize that those grounds are something more than
a mere foundation upon which to construct build-
ings. And, as he passes on into the upper classes,
he will carry with him that needed respect for the
Michigan campus which is so conspicuously absent
at the present time. i
In 'promoting the argument for complete prohi-
bition of tobacco among first year men, one might
mention that such action would afford a desirable
increase in discipline, and, in the majority of cases,.
would help enforce the state law concerning the
selling of tobacco to minors. But these are only in-
cidental to the deeper significance which the observ-
ance of such a rule would effect.
Although Michigan is laying plans for producing
a campus movie, the credit for being first in the
field goes to the University of Wisconsin.-Through
the ,production of "Not Responsible", to be shown
here tonight, Wisconsin has set a pace ;it is now for
us to quicken it.
It is not too soon to begin saying, "Cut out the
short cut."
We are anxious to see just what the weather man
has in the three remaining varieties. We are thor-
ouhgly aware of what constitutes the other 44.
iie Telescope
Question
Though knickerbockers for co-eds
Are not allowed in daily wear,
Each maid goes riding now and then
So she can sport a snappy pair.
But do they ride (this question's one
Which manages to get our rabbit),
Because they love equestrian fun,
Or merely 'cause they have the habit?
1At Two Bells
"Doris, hasn't that beau of yours gone yet ?"
"No, Dad. But I have him going."

Bi g Reductions
On All "M" Books at
Both Ends of the Diagoi

nal Walk

------------------ --------------------

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Espress Cars - 6:e0
a. i., 7:0 a. i., 8:0 a. im., 9:oo a. m. and
hourly to 9:05 p. mn.,
Jackson Express Cars (lo stops f An
Arbor)P. :47n . .an every two hours to
Local Cars East Bound-5:55 a.m., 7:00 a.
m. and every two hours .to :oo p. M., 11.00
p. 31. To Ypsilanti only-u x:4o p. im.12:25
a. M., 1:x a.S a.~".
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7 :S. a. wn, a:4*
p. an.
To, Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited ears:
8:47, 10:47, a. M+, 12:471 2.47, 4:47.
'T,, Jackson and Lansing -- Limited: 1:47
1. r.
1922 MARCH 1922
S M T W T F S
1 ,2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12' 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 39 -31
HATS -. SPRING - HATS
Reblocked at greatly .reduced prices.
Turned inside out, with all new trim-
mings they are as good as new. High
class work only.
FACTORY HAT STORE
417 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792

Buy your class
idvertisers.-Adv.

toques from Daily You'll find many bargains
read Michigan Daily Ads.-,

C
L
E
A
N
I
N
G

9

PRESSERS
iIWone 628.,

'S

1.

Phone

REPAIRING

ood
.out

7, 1922
AMBRECRT.

.9
Mon.3
fitA:ii1\ltitt9
"S
*7
"
"
.
" 1 *~
.
"
.
"6

0

- -- - ---
.TS CHAMPIONSHIP
ence all-sports championship,
hips for single sports ? This
by "E. G. B.-Michigan", a
<e of the News. column of the
ie main advantage of such a
ie writer,. would be to keep
in a continual boil from Sep-
Ls to the practicability of the
a a point system, which would
port according to its impor-
which cannot be tossed aside
possibilities that it is strange
>ught up before. Put into ef-
he establishment of a greater
:hools in the athletic field than
ed. To be Conference all-
Id mean far more to a uni-
o be recognized as leader in
rsity sports. Then, too, such
for greater fairness in rank
ss of various institutions, by
roper place according to its
ty. More remote results, but
es, might be the lessening of
>n the present major sports,.
fore catholic interest in ath-

W4

at the system of interfraternity athletics
-ation at Michigan, is enough to suggest
n ought to be feasible for, the Confer-
r our intramural arrangement, a f rater-
s a certain number of points for every
ich it is entered, with added credit be-
e champion in any one field. At the end
the points accumulated by each organi-
:ounted, and the fraternity with the
nber becomes all-round ,champions, with
ag groups trailing along in the order of
ng. Minor interfraternity sports, such
11 and bowling, are include, as are also
as baseball, basketball, soccer and swim-
ie plan should be considered as applica-
:onference, the interfraternity model
bly be taken as a guide.
ng a plan so uique as the one suggested,
Conference would be almost certain to
. We could retain our plan of award-
nships in each individual sport; but we
rovide each university the prospect of
n greater honors, as acknowledged lead-;
ns of competition.
:sentatives of the various Big Ten uni °
ght do well to consider the all-sports.
ly, when they assemble for their annual
n June.
VARD GREATER RESPECT
inor observances, certain inconsequen-
s, when required of us tend to increase
for a person or institution. As the stu-
his hat in passing the President of the

Song of the Strap-Holder
The street car is a leveller,
Which recks not brain or brawn,
For when a man goes home in that
fIe's jus$ hanger-on.
A Playlet
4 (In innumerable acts)
Act. i. Enter State Street Sam. "Ah,,a beauti-
ful spring day. I'll have to go out and get me a
date." Exit Sam.
Act. 2. Enter State Street Sam. "Pshaw. It's
snowing. Guess I'll take the moth balls out of my
winter coat again." Exit Sam.
Act 3. Enter State Street Sam. "Well, what
the devil do you know about that? A ' beautiful
spring day again. Guess I'll have to go out and get
me a date." Eggs-at Sam.
Acts 4, 5, 6, ad infinitum.: Cf. Acts I, 2, and 3.
Curtain.
Patherly Advice
Dear Erm:
Would it be right for me to cut a former lover of
mine on the campus?
Yours, Broken-hearted.
Dear Bro: If he treated you badly enough we
might suggest that you cut him in some more vital
place.
The Caveman's Diary
Chap. 3. Owing to the great increase of popula-
tion within the last thirty years, dwellings are at
an immense premium. Meanwhile, because of the
infrequency of severe storms, building is at a stand-
still, and unless some new caverns are discovered
soon the community will be in desperate straits.
Our Hero Lover
He clasped her to his manly vest,
But dropped her with a choke.
For as he reached to feel his vest,
He found his pen had broke.
-Imp.

STSFITT
TELEPHONE 214 F-1.
ENU
THINx
ENUs EVEROMNED
and other Metal Pencils
T HEname VENUS is your
guarantee of perfection.
Absolutely crumble-proof,
smooth and perfectly graded.
7 PGREES,
2B soft & black H med.hard
B soft 2H hard
F tera 4H extra hard
HB nwedium-for general use
' Sc per rube of 12 lead's;
$1.50 per dozen tusbes
Ifyourdeal rmnnotsupplyyouwriteus.
American Lead Pencil Co.
215 Fifth Ave., pept.DlNewYork
As us about the new
VENUS EVERPOINTED PENCILS
LET ME TELL YOU
THIS MY FRIEND-
U PON OUR
WORK YOU
C AN
i DEPEND b
E want to impress upon
the minds of every one
who needs plumbing or
is apt to need plumbing or who
has a. friend who needs some
plumbing done or some repair
work looked after, that our work
is absolutely dependable, and
that we can nurse any piece of
broken down'plumbing ack to
life if it's mendable.

Wahr's S
108 South

One of gray brick, with gray kid saddle,
at $8.50.
One of smoked horse, brown saddle, with 1
at $800.

I
ti
_.-
{)
E'
Ii1
g'

r

I

.i

Good Clothes
Honestly made all-wool fabrics
hand tailored in the best Amer-
jcan shops.

Conservatively designe~d
young men.
They are good clothes.

for

$45.00-$57.50

Another lot of mixed silk-
wool ties gust in, $1.00

Bera nek
& Martin

II

Famous Closing Lines
"Soused again," said the dish-rag as
threw it into the water.

the cook
ERM.

32

0 so. MAIN ST.,
Phone 245

WAGNER & COMPANY
r Wen V090 1848
STATE STREET AT LIBERTY

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan