100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 05, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-03-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WILL SPEAK ]

ATj

FFECTIVE OCT. 1o, 1921
:ntral Standard Time
P.M. A&PM
Daily Daily
Adrian ..Ar. 7.00 12:45
Tecumseh .... 6:25 12:10
. Clinton......6:05 x:so
Saline ...... 5:15 11:00
Ann Arbor Lv. 445
P.M. A&PM

Exclusive designs
in
HATS and GOWNS
MRS. GRACE VAN SCHOICK
PHONE 795"W
230 Nickels Arcade

Harrison E. Howe, editor of the
Journal of Industrial and Engineering
Chemistry, will talk to the Michigan
section of the American Chemical so-
ciety ogn "American Chemical Liter
ature" next Tuesday, followinga din-
ner of that organization at 6:30 o'clock
in the Union. After the speech there
will be an informal discussion on the
subject. ,
Lost something? A Classified Ad in
The Daily will find it for you.-Adv.
Buy your class toques from Daily
advertisers.-Adv

Read Up
AND HOLIDAYS_

,

P.M.
*Adrian . ..Ar. 9:00
Tecumseh . 8:25
Clinton ..... 8:os
*Saline .. 7:15
Ann Arbor Lv. 6:45
P.M.

Attention!

AUTO OWNERS

New Garage with an Old Policy
SERVIC E

Washing

Storage
Yes! It's Fireproof.

Repairs

Scene from "Not Responsible," Wis-
consin Student Movie, to be shown
next Tuesday, March 7, at Hill Au-
ditorium.
PROPOSE NEW COLLEGE AS
CHANGE FROM MODERN TYPES
(Continued from Page One)
The lay board, continues the draft,
should be broadly representative of
the civic and professional bodies of
the community. Beginning with the
earliest classes, the alumni should be
represented on this board and ulti-
mately elect a majority of its member-
ship. The studentebody should 'be
recognized as an'integral part of the
college.
There should be a cabinet in which
the three above named bodies of the
college, and the non-professional mem-
bers of the teaching staff, have repre-
sentation.
Officers and committees necessary
for the work of each of the three con-
stituent groups or bodies of the col-
lege, should be elected by them and
have their duties and tenure deter-
mined. The executive officers of the
faculty sho'uld be either voting or ex-
officio members of the cabinet. It

tional policies and to formulate the
budget, which, when adopted by the
faculty, they should administer. i
The maximum only of the budget
should be determined by the lay board.
Property and funds should be held in
trust for the faculty corporation by
established investment and banking
companies, selected and advised by the
executive officers of the college and
by the lay board.
Such a college, if a new institution,
continues the draft of the principles,
should seek to serve the employed
classes and others not provided for by
the existing institutions. It should
use its freedom for the purpose of
pioneering in the field of higher educa-
tion and should hold closely to "qual-
ity production." Those who are able
should pay tuition charges sufficient
to cover the cost per student for the
operation of the institution. Ample
funds should be provided fordscholar-
ships, equipment, and endowment
Public school buildings with their
equipment and 'public libraries will
probably be used in the early andex-
perimental period.
Prof. A. C. Love joy, ┬░of Johns Hlop-
kins university, commenting upon the
plan as a whole, says: "The form of
organization here proposed seems to be
admirable. This alone would give the
prospective college a distinction among
American institutions of higher educa-
tion, and would undoubtedly tend to
draw to" it a faculty superior to that
which might otherwise be obtained by
a new institution."
The list of those who think the plan
worth trying contains several college
deans and presidents and professors of
wide reputation.. In addition to those
quoted above, a few of the others are:
Deans Henry M. Bates and. A. H.
Lloyd, of Michigan; Profs. L. C. Kar-
pinski, I. Lubin, C. S. Vibbert, A. E.
Wood, C. M. Cooley, H. L. Wilgus, De
Witt H. Parker, F. N. Seott, R. M.
Wenley, and A. G. Canfield, Dr. J. E.
Kirkpatrick, and Mr. W. A. Kohler, of
Michigan; Dr. David Starr Jordan,
president emeritus of Leland Sanford
university; Prof. James Ha'rvey Rob-
inson, of the New School of Social Re-
search, N. Y:; Prof.Edwin D. Starbuck,
of the University of Iowa, and Presi-,
dent Edward S. Parsons of Marietta
College, Ohio.

NATIOI

Louisville, Ky., March 3.-Unless
the government acts soon, a will with
a strange request, may prevent the
purchase of Mammoth cave, Kentucky,
as a national park. This was pointed
out by Stephen T. Mather, director of
national parks, in a report recently is-
sued. A move for the purchase of the
cave as a national park is now under
way and has been urged upon con-
gress for action.
"The 3,000 aercs sought for thespark
purposesaat the entranlceto Mammoth
Cave," says Mr. Mather's report, are
in private hands under the terms of
the famous will which dictated that
the land must be held in trust until
such time as the death of the last of
the named heirs occurs, when it is to
be sold at public auction in its en-
tirety.
"Because of the advanced age of the
two surviving heirs, it may be ex-
pected that it will not be long before
this world-famous cavern will be sold
under the hammer, and unless some
means are found to take it over na-
tionally at that time either through
congressional appropriation or through
donation of some public-spirited 'indi-
vidual or organization, the cave will be
lost for , all time as a national park
possibility and will continue to be pri-
vately exploited."
PI KAPPA ALPHA NSTALLS
BETA TAU CHAPTER HERE-
Pi Kappa Alpha, national fraternity,
installed Beta Tau chapter last night
at the Michigan Union.; The local
chapter was formerly known a's the
Phylon Club which was organized in
1915 with with 15 members. Mr. James
L. Francis, grand secretary of the or-
ganization, administered the ritual to
the 32 active members. The Michigan
chaptei is the fifty-seventh to be in'-
stalled.

Campus Garage
C. RICHTER, Prop.
504 E. Washington Phone 168
Next to Merchant's Delivery Co.

__d

- h y
, , l
v .. '"j~' e

s

TODAY AND MONDAY
THE GIRL WITH THE MILLION DOLLA(R SMILE

Walda Hawley i "The LOve Charm"

ew Styles--High Quality

iti

--Low Prices.

I

Hart Schaffner and Jlarx clothes

give

you everything you want

YOU'LL find all of the new colorings hiere;
new patterns, new four button models,
new sports styles'--- new notes in all models!
Nothing better anywhere.
You'll find the finest quality in all fabrics
and tailoring; styles that keep their looks, and
long service that means economy. If you
don't---money back.,

"eAlong Ca me Ru th

I

Just a poor relation but she could sew

I

In fact they asked her whether she could sew even before her portly aunt and hoity-toity cousin would let
her in the front door.
But there's a special Providence that looks out for country cousins.
in the very fashion magazine they handed her to copy thei dresses from was a wonderful article that was
going to turn the village of Primton upside down. It was called,"The Love Charm." You know the kind-
'show me the man and I'll show you how to win him!"
And so this little lady put the "charm" to work.
Sakes alive ! Maybe it didn't work!
Just completely snared the leading young Primpton banker so that even a jazz party and a bunch of ances-
tors couldn't undo the charm!
If you want to see the meatest kind of modern roping based on an ancient love charm don't pass up this
feature!

Suit priced as
low as

0i

Topcoat prices
start at

,,

$30

$30o

ADDED Schedule
MATINEE
1:30 3:00 4:30
FEATURINC EVENING
NEAL BURNS AND HELEN DARLING 7:00 8:50
A CHRISTIE COM E DY .Last feature starts 9 p. m.

.eule

Conlin

Fiegel

Co.

COMING TUESDAY

ATTRAOTION EXTRAORDINARY

Main at Washington

CECIL B. DeMILLE'S PRODUCTION
'"SATVRDAY NIGHT"
Gorgeous in Setting and Perfect in Detail

.: w

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan