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March 03, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-03-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CARS

wanuacawie, Dusnescs ana proie-
sional men. Names that appear on
the national advisory boards, include
Joseph A. Faurot, deputy police com-
missioner, New York, Dan Beard,'na-
tional Boy Scout commissioner, J. A.
Hall, educational director Associated
Advertising 'Clubs of the World, and
Gutzen Boglum, sculptor and presi-
dent of the Inuternational Sporting
Club.

T BODYI

L THEFTS'
MARKET

of Dealing With
s System of
lIearanceJ

[arch 2.-Destroy the'
stolen automobiles and
the thefts, is the plan
as of formation by the,
tor Theft Commission
and protective devices
themselves inadequate,
ran Courtland, commis-
professional motor car
shed. Motor vehicles of
value of $300,000, the
says, are stolen every
cited States, despite all
n to check the thievery.
s of persons thrive as

Require Registration
The plan is this:
A car is stolen in Chicago. If the
numbers are changed one of two
things happens, either a duplicate of
some other number is made or a fake
number, one that the manufacturer
never placed on a car. When the car
is sold and re-registered in any state
some number must be given. A dupli-
cate number will immediately be
caught and the two or more cars
carrying that number will be
thoroughly investigated. A fake num-
ber will show up just as quickly and
be looked into. If they number is not
changed there will be a r'eport of the
number on the commissions records
as that of a stolen cad and when the
same number is registered again from
the same state or any other it will im-
meditely be caught.
lack National Clearance
The lack of any national clearance
system in the past has been one of
the largest contributing factors in
making this lawlessness easy and
profitable, Mr. Van Courtland states.
With the Commission's national clear-
ance system in operation a car stolen
in Maine the numbers changed and
the car sold and registered in Cali-
fornia, would immediately be caught
he asserts.
The plan is virtually a "finger-
print" system as applied to automo-
biles.. A master-record of every car
registered in the 48 states as well as
the new cars that come into existence
is to be kept at the commissioner's
headquarters. The numerical ar-
rangement of the records makes check-
ing of any vehicle simple and auto-
matic. _
Through this "national clearance
test" the commission believes that it
will be virtually impossible to dis-
pose permanently of a stolen machine.
Closely identified with the commission
are sheriffs, police department heads,

STAT TO STRIBUTE
HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT WILL
PAY ONE-FIFTH OF DEBT
TO COUNTIES
Lansing, March 2.-The state high-
way department expects to distr ibute
this month about $500,000 of the $2,-
500,000 it owes counties for state re-
ward roads. With that payment the
state will owe the counties 'approxi-
mately $2,000,000, while the counties,
as part of their contribution toward
state trunk lines for last year, will
owe the state about $1,750,000.
Some time ago the history depart-
ment announced that under the 1922
program no highway work will be,
done in counties that have not paid
their debts to the state. Some of the
counties have intimated that they will
not pay the state until the state has
paid them what it owes on state re-
ward. The result would be an appar-
ent deadlock, but highway department
officials ,declare that there will be no
tie-up in the work for the simple
reason that the counties, when served
with an ultimatum to pay, will pay
rather than be ov'erlooked in this
year's program.
That the state is within its rights in
not paying state reward claims to
counties immediaely, is the conten-
tion of the highway department. Offi-
cials point out that the state has not
the money at this time to pay the
claims, and that the law provides that
they need not be paid until there is
money in the treasury.
Midget on Church Program Tonight
' Entertainment at the First Metho-
dist church starting at 7:30 o'clock
tonight will be furnished by Miss May
Consaul and several members of the
School of Music. The program is
under the a spices of the Young Wo-
men's auxiliary of the church. Miss
Consaul is a professional character
reader and has traveled around Michi-
gan for quite a time. She is a real
midget, and although she is about
forty years old, ahe has the growth
of an eight-year-old child.
__R A E
_ ast Times Today
DOUGLAS McLEAN in
"PASSING THROUGH"
Also Century Comedy
This "AD" with 16 Cents will
admit you today.
Note: Tae Rae has discontinued
Serial Pictures on Friday.
-nR A Em

Know Your Alumni
(By Courtesy of Chimes)
Do You Know
That Harry Alverson Franck was
born in Munger, Michigan, in 1881,
that he traveled around the world in
1904 and has been traveling ever
since, that he knocked about in South
America on a recent tramping tour
and wrote as a result a book called
"Vagabonding Down the Andes," an-
other addition to his long list of ex-
periences, that he is a prominent lec-
turer and appeared in Ann Arbor very
recently in that capacity, that he is
FRIDAY - SATURDAY
Alice Calhoun

a frequent contributor to Century,
and finally and most important, that
he graduated from the Lit School in
1903?

in

Tny Sag's Marionettes

4

as

Mimes

Theatre

. -.

March 10th,'Afternoon and Evening

Afternoon 3:3O-"The Rose and the Ring"
Evening 8:00-"Rip Van; Winkle"

in
"The Matrimonial
Web'.."

" .

I

Children under ten, $1
Tickets at Wahr's

Others $1.50
and Graham's

ry' -
/f. / / ~

THE TURKISH CICARETTE

'FO ^T
ARE yAOEESPE iVAtĀ£1
OS11 tA41C F 6 4tA
1 M1E9Ft4RT

{i^ 4.y _':

,
" '

EVERY day MURADS
are held higher in the.
estimation of the men
who smoke them.
They are the standard of
Taste.a
They are 100% pure Turk-
ish tobacco of the finest
vaetoes grown.
They never disappoint -

never fail-never change-
You are proud to smoke
them in any company-,on
any occasion.
They are the largest sell.
ing high-grade cigarette in
the world.
The cigarette smokers of
America DO prefer Quality
.o Quantity.

20,

I

M~akers .oJ the Iig-cM QrSt&, Turkish
and E~p (Jan (#yarees in the MWndd

Judge for Your

i

I

999 TAXI
NOW 35 Cents

Matinee,
Adults

_ ..~ .

2 -3:30

Evening, 7 - 8:40

,20c
Kiddles, 10.

Adults, 3Qc

Friday

- Saturday

Corinine

Gr iffith

Every Passenger Insured
Against Accident

IN AN INTENSELY DRAMATIC
PHOTOPLAY OF CONTRASTS

r

ORAL

FIBRE

A GOOD

RETURNED BY POPULAR REQUEST

ESTMENT

BUY

AN

Snub
Pollard

DOD O

RE I D

Pathe

Niece of Wallace Reid

N

DELIGHTED A LARGE AUDIENCE
LAST NIGHT WITH HER

OVERC O A T

IN

CLEVER SONGS,

4.

f

Less 33 1-3%

WUERTH

"Rich Man,
Poor Man"

DANCES

.

IMPERSONATIONS
And Will Perforin Friday and Saturday

ORCHES

WADHAMS & CO.

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