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October 08, 1921 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-08

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A1L'xiY.I11LLK
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DAY ANDIG
SERVI(

)

No. 12.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTQBER 8, 1921

PRICE F:

* FOOTBALLERS
IE FOR ANNUAL
LVERINE BATTLEI

MARKS TWENTY -
MEETING OF TWO,
SCHOOLS

FIFTH

CITY ORDINANCE
FIXES TAXI FARE
According to the city ordinance of
Ann Arbor, the driver or owner of
any public conveyance may deOmand
and receive for carrying passengers
from any place within the city of Ann
Arbor to any other place within the
city 50 cents for the first passenger
and 35 cents for all additional pas-
sengers.
These are the prices upon which
Ann Arbor taxicabs are supposed to
operate, and the city ordinance does
not justify any prices above these, ex-
cept when they are especially arrang-
ed for before the contr'act is made.
The ordinance does, however, allow
an additional charge of 25 cents for
all stops made at the request of the
passenger.
SENATE FAVORS CHANCE,
IN TAX RVISION BIL~L

ULARS WILL START
AGAINST SCIENTISTS

tl Dope on Relative Strength,
Visitors Has Preceded '
Them

ofI

Case footballers will oppose the
Wolverines in the second gridiron bat-
tle of the 1921 season to be played on
Ferry field this afternoon. In the
Case aggregation the Yostmen will be
pitted against a practically unknown
quantity, little information regarding
the relative strength of the Cleve-
landers having preceded them. Aside
from the fact that they hold a pair
of 14 to 0 victories over two Ohio col-
lege elevens, nothing can be said in
reference to their football prowess.
The game this afternoon will mark
the twenty-fifth meeting of the teams
representing the two schools, and
will be the first time in many years
that the Scientists have not been given
the first place on the Michigan sched-
ule. In the past 24 games, the Ohio
gridders have fought for a lost cause,
on only one occasion were they able to
tie the Wolverines. However, in all
these contests they have been known
to fight to the last ditch, and have
rightfully earned the name of "The
Fighting Scientists." They can be
depended upon to put up their usual
"scrappy" fight this afternoon.
Will Start Regulars
Although Coach Yost is not partic-
ularly worried as to the outcome of
the game, he will have all of the reg-
ulars in the line-up, at least during
the earlier part of the contest. Ernie
Vick will be on deck at center, closely
sandwiched in between Capt. "Duke"
Dunn and "Gob" Wilson, the two hus-
ky Varsity guards. Cappon and Stan
Muirhead will be on hand to gain
some more of the much needed ex-
perience at the tackle positions,
while on the flanks, Bernie Kirk and1
Paul Goebel will been seen in ac-
tion, ready to try- their hands at
snaring any passes that may come
their way.
The .same backfield quartet that
piled up 44 points on Mt. Union last
Saturday will again hustle the pig-
skin around, with Banks calling sig-
nals at quarter, Eddie Usher to
plunge through the Case line, Frank
Steketee to do the punting honors and
attempt to repeat his stellar perform-
ance of last week, and Harry Kipke,.
ever-ready to uncork a few flashy end
runs, to keep the trio company.
Yost Will Try All Taekles
With the capability of the Case line
absolutely unknown to the Michigan
"Hurry-Up" mentor, he has expressed
an earnest desire that they present
a formidable forward wall, so as to
enable him to test out his linemen
thoroughly, especially the tackles. .
He has said that he will give Swan,
Fairbarn, and Garfield an opportunity
to prove their worth at the disputed
tackle positions some time before the
final whistle blows. In fact, he hasj
said that he would use almost every
man on the squad during the. coutse
of the game, sometime after the final
outcome was made certain in MichI-

REPUBLICAN LEADERS
ON CONSIDERATION
AMENDMENTS

DECIDE
OF

WAGES AND PRICE[S
Uneinployment Conference Committee
Stands for Downward
Adjustment
LOWER FREIGHT RATES
ARE FAVORED IN REPORT
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 7.-Practical com-
pletion of a majority report on per-
manent measures for the betterment
of business throughout the countfy
was effected today by" the manufac-
turers' committee of the National
Conference on unemployment.
The majority of the committee was
understood to hold the view that the
readjustemnt of wages and prices
downward was a necessity precedent
to a commercial readjustment from
which a revival of the nation's indus-
try could spring.
Want Lower Rates
In c nnection with the readjust-
ment process, the report was under-
stood to favor lower freight rates to
permit of a greater flow of commerce.
Passage of the railway funding bill
for the financial relief of the carriers
now pending in congress, was under-
stood to be regarded by the report as
an important step in economic bet--
terment, while the discontinuance of
functioning of the railway labor board
which came in conflict with the ac-
tivities of the Interstate Commerce
commission was regarded favorably.
Lighten Taxation
Legislation changing the -Adamson
eight hour law was understood to be
suggested as a means of more readi-
ly accomplishing industrial readjust-
ment. On the subject of taxation the
report was understood to favor a pro-
gram lightening unnecessary burdens
and at the same time providing am-
ple revenues for the federal govern-
ment.
Lack of unanimity upon various
features of the report was indicated
by committee members who, however,
declined to discuss the report until it
was made public at the fall confer-
ence.
COSTSSTAE $1OROO

(By Associated Press)l
Washington, Oct. 7.Amendments to
the pending tax revision bill agreed
to by the Republican leaders in, the
senate were made public today, in ad-
vance of their consideration tomor-
row, by the majority members of the.1
finance committee. They would pro-
vide for:
A maximum surtax of 50 per cent1
on that part of the income in excess
of $200,0Q0.
Repeal of express, freight, passen-
ger, and Pullman* transportation tax,
effective at the passing of the bill.
An increase from $2.50 to $4 a gal-
lon in the tax of distilled spirits pro-
duced, imported or withdrawn from
bond.
Capital stock tax of $1 on each,
$1,000 on invested capital.
'A graduated increase in the estate
tax 'rate to a maximum of 50 per cent
on the excess over $1,000,000.
Repeal of. the so-called "nuisance
tax".
Elimination of the proposed tax on
hotel accommodations.
Reduction in the tax on candy to
3 per cent.
The other excise provisions of the,
senate bill would stand, including a
repeal of the excess profits tax next
Jan. 1; a flat tax of 15 per cent on
corporation incomes, and increase ex-
emption for the head of families on
account of dependents.
PROF. FOOTE TO SPEAK AT
UNITARIAN CHURCH SUNDAY
Prof. H. Wilder Foote, formerly of
this city, will occupy the pulpit at the
Unitarian church tomorrow morning.
Professor Foote left Ann Arbor in 1910
to take a position in the Harvard
Divinity school.
His theme for Sunday will be "Is the
church a Failure?" The services will
begin at 10:40 o'clock. During his stay
in this city, Professor Foote will be
the guest of Prof. A. H. White. Ar-
rangements have been made for mem-
bers of the church to meet him before
he leaves Sunday afternoon.
FINAL TRYOUT FOR OPERA
CAST BRINGS 26 NEW MEN
Twenty-six new tryouts were add-
ed to the list of men students seeking
cast parts in the 1922 Michigan Union
Opera, in the final tryout held Friday
night in Mimes Campus theater.
This number brings the total, since
the first call last spring, to 732. A
chorus tryout will be called some time
next week.

CLASSES OPENED
BY CITY Y.W.C.A
Educational courses of the City Y.
W. C. A. began at a rally in the asso-
iation building last night. The asso-
ciation has secured teachers for all
the subjects and they were present
at the rally to meet their students.
Classes were formed in the follow-
ing subjects: French, Spanish, citi-
zenship, dressmaking, millinery, china
painting, art embroidery, business
adminstration, including savings and
investments and personal budget, do-
mestic science, including plain and
fancy sewing, cooking, table service,
and dietetics.
Glee club work, orchestral study,
and ukelele lessons will be found in
the musical courses. Dramatics and.
story telling will also be included in
the schedule. Swimming, physical
training, and dancing form another
group.
HARVARD s INIANAIs
EASTERN FEATUE TODAY
'1
YALE MEETS NORTH CAROLINA;
WESTERN RESERYE FACES
NAVY ELEfrEN
Excepting the intersectional games
in the East today, there are few games
of importance scheduled. There are
three of these games and all should
attract considerable attention as they
will exhibit all the tactics of coachess
as far West as the Big Ten Confer-
ence. The most important of these is
the Harvard-Indiana match.
The second intersectional game is
between Yale and North Carolina at
Yale, while the third is Wetern Re-
serve against the Navy. Although
both games will draw large crowds,
the different styles of play will great-1
ly increase the interest.1
The other big games in the East are
Pittsburgh-West Virginia, Rutgers-
Lehigh, and Colgate-Princeton. These
games are between teams who are riv-
als of long standing and should at-;
tract ,a large attendance., With the
exception of Pitt, this will be the first
real opposition of any of the teams
and will be the first chance of the
eastern fans to' get a line on the big
teams of the 1921 season.
The rest of the leaders have com-
paratively easy games, Dartmouth
playing New Hampshire, Washington
and Jefferson playing West Virginia
Wesleyan, and Pennsylvania playing
(Continued on Page Four)
COLE BUILDING 21-FAMILY
APARTMENT NEAR CAMPUS
Structure Planned to House Teaching
Staff of Schools and Married
Students
Construction work on a 21-family
apartment house on East University
avenue is progressing as rapidly as
possible, according to A. R ,Cole, l-
cal contractor, and the new building
will be ready -for occupancy at the
opening of the second semester.
This property, the possession of
the Pryor estate for the past 30
years, was acquired by Mr. Cole dur,
ing the early summer, and' work on
the n building began the first of
August. It is Mr. Cole's intention to
rent the apartments to members of
the teaching staff of the Ann Arbor
schools, to married students who are
attending the University, and to
mothers desirous of spending the
winter in Ann Arbor while their sons

or daughters attend the University.m
ENGINEERS HEAR NORTHROP
i LECTURE AT NEXT MEETING

CALL 960 FOR SCORES
Results of the world series
game and of the Michigan-Case
football game will be given out
from The Daily editorial -office
tonight. Call 960 after 6:30
o'clock.
Zoology Museum
Given Collection
By Boy_ Camp'ers
Boys who attended the University
fresh air camp this summer have re-
cently presented an insect collection-
containing 160 specimens to the' Zo-
ology museum.° At the camp, which
was directed by MW. E. Lockwood, an
ornithologist of Tecumseh, Mich., the
boys became, interested in hunting in-
sects. The collection is now at Lane
hall and will be exhibited soon in the
window of one of the State sfreet book
stores.
Mr. Lockwood had recently collected
over 300 specimens of insects for the
Field museum in Chicago. Since the
summer he has received many letters
from boys who attended the camp
telling of .their continued interest in
collecting specimens.
According to F. M. Galge, curator of
the Zoology museum, .the exhibit is a
typical collection of local insects,
among which are butterflies, beetles,
bugs, flies, dragon flies, and ant-lions.
After the collection is exhibited, on
State street, it will be placed in the
1insect hall of the museum.

Shawkey Loses Control
Game Apparently
Away

After
Stowe

GIANT, SLUGGERS WREST VICTORY
FEHURLERS IN THiRI
GAME OF SERIES BY SCORE I

(By Associated Press)
New York, Oct. 7.-The Giants b
from their two days of lethargy t
and sprinkled the green sward at
Polo grounds with such a showe
hits that the Yankees were swan
under a score of 13 to 5 in the I
game of the woirld series.
Feeling the Yankees' thunder aE
latter had-'stolen theirs in the prev
games of the series, John McGr
men, after spotting their Ame]
league opponents for a four run
promptly cancelled this advan
driving Bob Shawkey off the m
in the third inning.
Break in Seventh
Then, after the score had run a
in a tie for three Innings, they b
out with an orgy of hitting ag
second string Yankee pitchers in
traditional "lucky seventh" in
pushing over eight runs and pilin
a total of 13 runs and 20 hits.
Despite its one sidedness, the
was of the sort that tickles the I
of the average baseball crowd, ,an
day's throng, despite the partisan :
ing of a goodly portion of it, wa
exception. The game was full
thrills, brilliant catches, daring
running and, on the Giant's. side,
distant hitting.
The crowd, with perfect bas
weather to bring it out, was a re
breaker for - this series. More
36,500 fans jambed the stands
bleachers.
All the Giants with the excepti(
Topey and Kelly figured in the hit
Burns and Snyder divided the ba
honors, each making four hits.
Ruth Fairs to Deliver
Babe Ruth had another colorles:
compared with some of his work
ing the season's campaign. In
trips to the plate he struck out t
made a single which scored two
kee runs and drew a base on 1
He left the game in the eighth it
after he had received a base on 1
It was said the home run king
suffering from an infected arm.
The Yankee fielders stood up
under the bombardment of hits
turned in some notable defensive':
These included a jumping catch i
second inning by Ward, the Ya
second sacker, which resulted
double play. George Burns, the.
center fielder, however, turned i
most remarkable feat of the
In the seventh inning he went
Pitcher Winn's long fly and while
on the run hauled down the drive
his shoulder, close to the center
fence. It was a marvelous fe
fielding and it drew a big demon
tion from the crowd.

TEAMS STAGE BAT'
DUEL IN THIRD II

PENNANT
LEAG

DASH OF
UERS STOPP
NATIONALS

Present delay in admitting patients
to the University hospital is costing
the state 4100,000 annually, according
to Auditor General 0. B. Fuller. Ef-
forts will be made by the state ad-
ministrative board to complete at least
part of the new University hospital.
Children sent here for treatment by
probate judges are often compelled to
wait three weeks before being receiv-
ed into the hospital, during which
time the state must pay the expenses
of the patient and attendant, Mr.
Fuller declares.
Members of the administrative board
will be here Wednesday to determine
how much of the hospital the state
can complete. Governor Groesbeck
is of the opinion that enough of the
hospital can be hurriedly finished to
accom date children sent here by
probate judges for treatment.
Brody Named for Board
Lansing, Oct. 7.-Clark L. Brody,
secretary of the Michigan State Farm
bureau, was appointed to the State
Board of Agriculture (governing board
of Michigan Argicultural college), by
Governor Groesbeck today. Mr. Brody
succeeds John W. Beaumont, of De-
troit, who recently resigned.
Mr. Beaumont is said to have resign-
ed because of his opposition to Prof.
David Friday, of the University of
Michiganibecoming president of the
IEast Lansing school.

Mac, ANNOUNCES SPECIA
R ATE TO IILLINOIS GA9ME,
Michigan Central authorities have
announced a round trip rate to the
Michigan-Illinois game, to be held at
Urbana, Oct. 29.
If arrangements can be made to in-
sure the purchase of 125 tickets, the
Michigan Central will run a special
train to and from Urbana. The round
trip transportation on this train will
be $14.60. \
Plans are being made by the Union
to sell tickets at the lobby desk.'
The hour of departure of the spe-
cial trains cannot be announced at
this time, but this information, to-
gether with the length of time requir-
ed by the special to make the through
run, will beprinted later.
HURREY, '00, VISITS CITY
TO AID FOREIGN STUDENTS
Michigan Grad Will Address Group
Interested in Missionary
Work

gan's favor.
Finishes with Signal Drill
Friday afternoon the coach made
his final preparations for the game.
After a short blackboard talk, he took
his footballers under the concrete
stands, because of the rain and sub-
(Continued on Page Eight)

n.

urch Plans Noon Hour Meetings
A new department in the Disciples
urch, across from the Union, con-
ting of a discussion group for Uni-
rsity men will be organized tomor-
w. The meetings will be held at
e noon hour under the leadership
Harold C. Koffman, of the Ann Ar-I
r'Bible chair.

CHEER LEADER TRYOUTS
Tryouts for assistant cheer
leaders are asked to 'report at
2:30 o'clock this afternoon at the
club hMuse on Ferry field. All
should appear in white uniforms.
No freshman will be eligible to
tryout.-

At the next meeting of the Engl-
neering society at 7:30 o'clock Mon-
day evening in the Natural Science
auditorium, Mr. Albert A. Northrop, of.
Stone and Webster, Inc., Boston; will
show by moving pictures and colored
slides the construction of the 60,000

Charles D. Hurrey, '00, head of the
department qk friendly 'relations
with foreign students of the interna-
tional committee of the Y. M. C. A., is
in Ann Arbor attending several meet-
ings in connection with his work. This
afternoon he will meet a group of Ann
Arbor citizens interested in entertain-
ing foreign students in their homes.
At a 6 o'clock dinner in Lane hall, he
will speak to a group interested in1
foreign missionary work. He will talk
to the Cosmopolitan club at 8 o'clock.
Mr. Hurrey was formerly student
secretary of the central department of
the Y. M. C. A. Later he was in South
America as general secretary for that
continent. For a time he occupied the
position of national student secretary
and now his work is chiefly concern-
ed with foreign students and the
World's Christian Student federation.

GYMNASTIC ABILITIES OF
FIR ESHXEN TO BE CHAR
Members of 'freshman gym cli
will be given careful tests this
to determine their abilities in var
forms of athletics, according to
plans of Dr. George A. May, dire
of Waterman gymnasium. A car
ly graded chart has been worked
in order that the men may see
they compare with the average.
Among the tests will be trial
chinning, dipping,. rope climbing,
put, bar vault, 50 yard dash, run
high jump, running broad jump,
ter mile run, gymnastics,
games, and contests. The men w
asked to note the results on the:
dividual charts as a record of
own performance.
Dr. May expects to be able toi
the work soon.

Schiedule for Tennis Tourney horse power hydro-electric plant
All girls who have signed up for the Sierra Nevada mountains.
the tennis tournament go to Barbour The talk will be. delivered in
gym Monday for schedule of mathces. non-technical manner and should1
Arrange with your opponent for match of interest to men in all branches
at earliest possible date. engineering.

in
a
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of

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