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February 26, 1922 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-02-26

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DAY
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No. 105;

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1922

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OLVERINES

OVER -RUN

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SCHOOL MAlGAINlES
OF ENIERN
H H I N
DISGIuSS PROBLEMS
TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS TAKE
UP PUZZLING ,
TOPICS
REPRESENTATIVES FROM
U NIVERSITIES SPEAK
Lyman Nained as Editorial Counellor;
Will Edit National
Articles
Engineering College Magazines As-
sociated entered its second day of
convention session yesterday at the
Union with a. discussion of business
problems in the morning with a
continuation of the same topics dur.
ing the afternoon.
Problems Presented
Leslie F. Van Hagen, vice-chair-
man, representing the University of
Wisconsin "Wisconsin Engineer,"
spoke on staff organizatiQn, dealing
with the, getting of work done, and
profits disposition. The question of
a university press, owned and oper-
ated by student publications, like that
of the University of Illinois, was dis-
cussed. One-man control versus
two-man control of magazines was
given attention.
Advantages of the monthly journal
as opposed to those of the quarterly
were next considered. It was the
general opinon that the larger maga-
ziie, made possible by quarterly pub-
lication, had a greater number of
readers, while the monthly was able'
to 'give better news service and have
a more permanent policy.
Edward A. Ash, advertising mana-
ger of the Tech Engineering News,
Massachusetts Institute of Technol-
ogy, took up the idea of local adver-i
tising, telling of the highly organ-
i'zed policy of his pblication, the in-
sertion of reading matter through the
advertising. The Tech Enginering
News refuses advertising from those
who do not feel they get results from
its. use, according to Mr. Ash.
Adertising Discussed
"National Advertising" was the top-
ic discussed by W. 13. Littell, repre-
senting the Princeton News Letter, in1
which he emphasized the disadvantagei
of having solid page ads, but made
an. appeal for uniform rates in adver-
tising. A general discussion Qf circu-
lation problems followed, where sub-
scriptions campaigns conducted in
college classes and various types of1
sales talks were debated.
Resolution's expressing1 the appre-
ciation of the convention of the hos-
pitality shown by the Michigan Tech-
nic were also passed. Style books for
each publication and the institution of
sinking funds were recommended.
H. E. Pride, alumni adviser of the
Iowa Engineer, Iowa State college,
remained general chairman of the as-
sociation, while Harold E. Lobdell,
of the alumni advisory council repre-
senting Tech Engineering News, Mas-
sachusetts Institute of Technology,
was elected. vice-chairman , together
with Leslie F. Van Hagen, from the
University of WiscInsin Wisconsin
Engineer.. Claire F. Lyman, of -the
engineering English department here,
was appointed editorial counsellor,
having charge of 'the editing of na-
tional articles written by such men
as Herbert Hoover and Charles. M.
Schwab.
Many Schools Represented
The technical magazines were rep-
resented as follows: Tech Engineer--
ing News, Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, Cambridge, Mass., by
Harold E. Lobdell," alumni advisory
council, Edward A. Ash, advertising
manager, and Benjamn P. Lane,

managing editor; Iowa Engineer, Iowa
State college, Ames, Iowa, by Robley
Winfrey, general manager, 01 C.
Schide, advertising manager, and H
E. Pride, alumni advisor; Illinois
Technograph, University of Illinois,
Urbana, Ill., by W. A. Mueller, busi-
ness manager, and W. R. Enyarto, as-
(Continued on Page Ten)

AUTO HEAD WILL
SPEAK HERE TODAY

R.

D. Chapin Is One of the Youngest
Executives in Automobile
World '

DR. ABRAM SIMON WHO ADDRESS-
es the University service this eve-
ning.
SIONTO ADDRESS
MEEINGTONIGHT
Prominent Rabbi Scheduled for Talk
Before University
Service
DETROIT CHOIR WILL FURNISH.
SPECIAL MUSIC FOR EVENT
Dr. Abram Simon; recognized as one
of the most prominent members of the
American Jewish ministry, will ad-
dress the regular University service
on "A New Heaven and a New Earth"
at 7 o'clock this evening at Hill audi-
torium.
Dr. Simon has been active in civic
affairs in the city of Washington, D.
C., his home, and among other public
offices has been president of the board
of education of that city. As one of
the foremost religious students of this'
country, he has written numerous
books, chiefly on religious pedagogy. He
saw service abroad in the recent
World war with the fRed Cross. At
the present time he is vice-president
of the Conference of American Rabbis.
The services today are in charge of
the Jewish -Student congregation at
the University and it is through their
efforts that Dr. Simon is being brought
here. *Recognized as a leader in the
thought of modern sect, Dr. Simon has
a message of interest to all students,
it is declared.
Music for the service will be ren-
dered by the Temple Beth El choir
of Detroit, composed of four of De-
troit's best known vocalists. The choir
is under the direction of Mr. William
Howland, who is well known in Ann
Arbor as former head of the vocal de-
partment of the School of Music, is
considered as one of Detroit's best
basses.
The service will be read by Rabbi
Leo Franklin, of Detroit, 'with the ex-
ception of the Scripture reading and
the benediction, which will be givenl
by Rev. S. S. Robbins of this city.
UNIYER0TY MUST FIND
SNFII SITE FOR SKAING

WILL TAKE AS HIS TOPIC
"THE AUTOMOTIVE FIELD"
*-
Entering the automotive industry
while it was still in its infancy, and
adapting himself to such a degree as
to become one of the youngest pres-
idents in the industry, is the record
of Roy Dikeman Chapin, '00, who will
deliver the Sunday meeting talk at the
Union this afternoon.
Mr. Chapin has been the chief exec-t
utive of the Hudson+ Motor Car com-
pany practically since its organization
in 1909. The organization of the Hud-
son company was effected through the
collaboration of Mr. Chapin, Howard
E. Coffin, F. . Bezner, and R. B. Jack-
son, all prominent figures in the auto-
motive world. Before the organiza-
tion of his own company Chapin was
associated with the Olds Motor works
in his home town of Lansing, shortly
after its being formed, later with the
Thomas Detroit company and the
Chalmers Detroit company. j
To automobile manufacturers Mr.
Chapin is known for his ability as an
organizer, and the success of his poli-
cy as an executive. He served as head
of the highways transport committee
during the war, and the stimulus in-
jected into the methods of overland
transportation during his adminstra-
tion have been felt increasingly since
the war.
Chapin is an ardent-supporter of the
Union, having at several times given
aid in various Union projects. His
topic this afternoon will be "The Au-
tomotive Field."
Symp honsy Gives
Third Concert
of Year Today
The University Symphony orchestra
will give its third concert of the sea-
son at 4:15 o'clock, this afternoon in
Hill auditorium. Today' program
will be a regular number in the series
of Twilifght Faculty concerts, compli-
mentary to the public. Patrons are
urgently requested to be prompt in
attendance, and are reminded that un-
der no circumstances will small chil-
dren be admitted, excepting such as
may be enrolled as students in the
School of Music, who will be admit-
ted at entrance number five, upon
showing their tuition receipt.
An interesting feature of the pro-
eram will be a concert overture by
Mrs. Helen M. Snyder, whose accom-
plishments along verious musical lines
have brought her recognition. The ti-
tle of the overture, "Youth," well de-
scribes the spontaneous melodies, the
facile modulations, and the fluent or-
chestration which characterize the
work.
Mrs. Maud Okkelberg, of the piano
department, soloist, will play Schu-
mann's Concerto. Mrs. Okkelberg,
who needs no introduction to patyons
of these covcerts, has given many re-
citals during the present season in ci-
ties of =Michigan and neighboring
states, every appearance having re-
sulted in a return engagement.
This- afternoon's program is as fol-
lows:
"Marche Militaire"..Schubert-Guiraud
"Valse Triste," from the "Kuole-
ma" music............Sibelius
Elegy, Op. 48, No. 3, for strings
.Tschaikovsky
Overture, "Youth"..Helen M. Snyder
Concerto, Op. 54, A minor..Schumann

COFFIN TO SPEAK
ON AtIRWARFARE
Plans for the entertainment of How-
ard E. Coffin, vice-president of the
Hudson Motor Car company, of De-
troit, who is to speak on "Bombing
by Airplane" at 7:30 o'clock Tuesday
evening in- Hill auditorium, are com-
pleted by George E.- Gregory, '22E,
president of the Engineering society.
Mr. Coffin is an authority-on aviation
and air bombing problems and comes
here with exclusive pictures of the
bombing tests recently conducted by
the United States army and navy de-
partments when the German battle-
ships and torpedo boat destroyers
were destroyed by air missles.
The illustrations, motion pictures
and lantern slides were taken by the
photographic section of the air serv-
ice and are the only ones in existence
outside of those owned by the govern-
ment. The value of these photographs
is indicated by the large part which
they played in the recent disarmament
conference at Washington.
USE DEBT TO PAY
BO-NUS IS URGED
Thirty Republican Members of House
Declare For Use of Foreign
Bonds,
WOULD AVOID OBNOXIOUS
TAX, CLAIMS ADVOCATES
Washington, Feb. 2Z.-Thirty Re-
publican members of the house of rep-
resentatives prominent in the group
opposing the sales tax came out form-
ally today in favor of using the re-,
funded foreign bonds to finance the
soldiers bonus.
In a joint open letter to Chairman
Fordney of the ways and means com-
mittee, they said, "The use of- these
bonds would remove a grossly unjust
proposal, prevent the political over-
turning of congress and would be just
to the ex-soldiers and save for us the
foreign debt."-
"The bonus should be passed with-
out any obnoxious tax and should be
passed without any delay," read a let-
ter by Representative Frear, of Wis-
consin, and signed by 29 other mem-
bers, mostly from western states.

46COUNT;MSME
ALMOST AT WILL, OVER WEAK

News of the Day
IN BRIEF

Chicago, Feb. 25.-Steps

I'l

toward the

organization of the Central Intercol-
legiate Athletic conference for all
major sports in the Middle West were
taken at a meeting today of -represen-
tatives from a number of schools not
comprising ' thee Western Conference.
An organization committee headed
by Coach Knute Rockne, of Notre
Dame, and included C. L.. Druce,
manager of athletics at the Univer-
sity of Detroit, was appointed to ar-
range for a further meeting here
March 18,- and rules for the new con-
ference are expected to be formulat-
ed at that time.
Philadelphia, Feb. 25.-The *inter-
state coal operators announced here
today that they have agreed to meet
representatives of the United Mine
Workers in, joint conference in New
York March 15' to .iitiate a new
rate agreement.
New ,York, Feb. 25. - Three more
failures of as many Wall street brok-
erage houses with combined liabilities
estimated at $100,000 and combined as--
sets of $33,000, occurred today. Con-
cerns which= have ,gone to the wall
since last November now total 30.
Total liabilities are estimated at $21,-
788,00 and assets at $10,548,000.
Fen' Tickets For
Univnrsity al
Remain OnSale

STRONG OFFE?4SIVE CAi
TO DEVELOP INTO
AWAY
ELY STARS ON OF
DROPPING 10 B)
Strong Guarding Allows
But Four Baskets I
Field
Michigan's basketball1
pletely overwhelmed theT
'last night at Waterman gyi
the one-sided score of 42
no time during the year ha
igan team come through sc
Featured by close guardi
Dart of the Maize and B3
and the remarkable shootin
the Michigan center and fo
game soon developed into a
for Coach Mather's team.
. Offense Strong
The Michigan offense
been1stronger than it was

MICHIGAN OVERWHELMS ILI!

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GIFT INCREASES FUND
FORC FAR EAST STUDENTS
DONATION IS BARBOUR'S THIRD
TO SCHOLARSHIP FOR
WOMEN
Former Regent Levi L. Barbour's
gift of property to the scholarship fund
for. Oriental girls accepted yesterday
by the Board of Regents, is the third
that Mr. Barbour has given for this
cause.
The first was given in June, 1917, a
sum of $100,000, and again in January,
1920, he made a further gift of $250,000
to this fund.
His last gift is a valuable piece
of down -town Detroit property and
will increase the income of the fund
more than $7,500 a year.. t" will be.
put in trust funds with the other
money. /
It was, while traveling in. the Or-
ient that Mr. Barbour conceived the
idea of this cholarship fund. The re-z
markable ca eers of three women, two
from China and one from Japan, early
graduates of the University, indicated
results that might be expected if the
way were opened here for the liberal
training of others from the Orient.
Returning, he soon made provision for
the scholarships now offered.
The Barbour scholarship is award-
ed annually. It is given to women re-
siding in the Far East, who desire to
come to America for higher education
and expect to return to their native
land for services. Certificates of char-
acter and certificates showing schol-
astic attainment and fitness for U-
iversity work have to accompany ap-
plications that hoeful aspirants send
in.

A few ticlets to the All-University
ball being given by the Detroit Univer-
sity of Michigan club at the new Gray-
stone in Detroit tomorrow┬░night are,
still available for members of the fac-
ulty and students. Although the affair
is invitational in Detroit, tickets were.
placed on general sale in Ann Arbor.
at the Union and the alumni office in.
Memorial hall.
The grand march will start at 9:30
o'clock and will be led by Mason P.
Rumney, '08E, president of the De-
troit alumni, and Mrs. Rumney. Mov-
ing pictures will be taken of the event
and will be shown in Detroit by the
Free Press Revu. Solos and fancy
dancing are on the program. , [usic
will be/ by Henry's Ritz orchestra.
Light refreshments will be served.
Maize and blue will predominate in
the decorations, but each . of the 25
co-operating universities will have
their colors. Tomorrow night will be
the opening of the Graystone,
The proceeds of the ball will be giv-
en to the Detroit University of Mich-
igan Women's association which will
then lonate the money to the -fund for
the new Women's league building.
The price is $5 a couple or $3 for a
single ticket.
Patrons and patronesses for{ the.
event include:.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry P. Joy, Mr. and
Mrs. Fred M. Alger, Mr. and Mrs.
Phelps Newberry, Mr. and Mrs. Dexter
M. Ferry, Jr., Judge and Mrs. Alexis
C. Angell, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Del-
bridge, Mr. James M. O'Day, Mr. and
Mrs. Standish Backus, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry C. Buckley, Mr. and Mrs. Franz
C. Kuhn, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Bowen,
Mr. and Mrs. James V. Oxtoby, Mr.
and Mrs. Neil McMillan, 'Jr., and Mr.
and Mrs. Donald Clark.
BASKETBALL TEAM LEAVES
FOR CONTEST WITH IOIA

Clever floor work coupled
accurate passing carried th
into the Tllinois territory
From here the uncanny
found the basket at will
'Michigan center threw no :
baskets form the floor.
On'the other hand, the
Tense was miserably we
Winters did not use the fl
fense which is generally e
Conference basketball co
stead he used but . four i
neath the basket and kept
forwards at the other end
With this arrangement,
work of Qipke, Miller, Ely
found innumerable holes i
defense with the result th
rolled up a score that is
largest that has been piled
a Conference team this ,
igan threw 1$ baskets fron
At the'same time, the Al
fense was characterized 1
strength. Illinois could m,
baskets from the floor. Ca
ey was held to one lone fie.
Mike Paper must go the ci'
fact. The dimiutive Vai
hung to his much large
every moment of the gan
mitted him to make but ye
at the basket within striki
Carney's shots were of nec
the middle of the floor fc
part. Carney's sh ratzs
part. Those who had di
Paper would be able to ha
were greatly mistaken.
The star of the game
was Ely. The lanky Mih
enjoyed the biggest night
had on the floor. Ten fie:
a total of 20 points was h
tion to the Varsity score.
ing eye was infallible a
work was all that could
He sank the most difficult
with others with the gr
Against both Stilwell and
linois' centers, respectiv
the tip-off. He outjumpi
every occasion. As a resu
got the ball from the out:
but a few quick passes h
beath the Illinois basket
der.
Miller Also Works
Miller, playing right fc
also responsible for 20 o
42 points. Five baskets fi
(Continued on Page

OWNERS WILL DISPOSE OF RINK
AT CLOSE OF PRESENT
SEASON
In all probability Weinberg's Coli-
seum will not be available for skating
and hockey after the close of the pres-
ent season according to the plans of
the owners.
The structure will either be sold
outright or be torn down and sold as
building material and as the present
bidders for the site desire to use it
for manufacturing purposes, it seems
likely that there will be no more skat-
ing there.
Mr. Julius Weinberg, proprietor, de.
clared that the reason for this action
was that the Coliseum is not a pay-
ing proposition to its owners because
of the short season during which it
was able to earn revenue. The build-
ing is allowed to remain idle during

SENIORS NOTICE,
Men senior lits must report to
Moe's now for cap and gown -.
measurements and senior women
must report to Mack and com-
pany before March 1.
. R. S. PEARE,
Chairman Cap and Gown Com-

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CAMPUS OPINION FAVORS
ELECTION OF CHEERLEADERS
The concensus of opinon on the
campus seems to be that the new
cheerleader plan as adopted by the
Student council is one that is well
worth while. Paul Goebel, '23E, cap-
tain of next year's Varsity football
team, says, "I consider this plan a
good. one. 'Certainly if the student
body selects. the cheerleaders they
will be satisfied and will support their
choice by cheering. To have a group
of cheerleaders accompany the team
would be effective especially when a'
large number of rooters are along."
"Gob" Wilson, '22, of last year's Var-
sity, is also of the same opinon. He
says, "I believe a system like this
will provoke much less criticism from
the campus, and that more real cheer-

the entire summer and in case of a
mild winter the revenue is too small
to make the proposition a paying one,
(Continued on Page Ten)
Instructor's Father Ill

. Following the game last night, the
Varsity left for Iowa on the 10:42
train via Chicago. Michigan plays
Towa on Monda vnizht in the first

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In regard to the work of the schol- game that a Michigan team has play-
arships Prof. W. C. Rufus, of the as- ed. on an Iowa floor. Iowa comes to
tronomy department, secretary of the Ann Arbor' for a return game on
committee in charge of the fund, says, March 4. The following men made
"This past year we have awarded the the trip: Miller, Kipke, Ely, Paper,
scholarship - of $700 per annum to 16 Birks, LeGalley, Whitlock, Pearman,
girls, who have come to this Universi- and McWood. Capt. Bud Rea did not
ty from Chine, Japan, and India. With make the trip. His injury received in
this last gift of Mr. Barbour's we will the Wisconsin game has not yet re-
be able to take care of 25 girls next covered and he will remain - in Ann
year and perhaps more in the future." Arbor for treatment so *that he will
Mr. Barbour was graduated in '76. be able to play in the games this
(Continued on Page Ten) week end.

it

Jean P. Cooley, of the physics depart-
ment, has been called to his home in
Erie Pa .o n ^""counto f the serio"

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