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February 25, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-02-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

UllI
NJELLI
Has Most
)n in

heaters

ARES

fthe R.O. T.
ost promising
eclared Major
gular army,
The unit is
reached the
ch character-
s of some of
but at head-
znit is looked
o achieve the

ge

ilinois, and
ere are 24
the area.
annual in-
and spent
y in Ann

>st urgent need of the Michi-
at the present time is ade-
:e for conducting the classes
necessaries of the organiza-
bullding in which it isnow
,s far inadequate, and soon
be vacated. The standing
higan unit will be materially
soOfn as the proper quarters
r9oms and other purposes
given to it."
C the most satisfying an-
its that I have heard while
,>r is the one made by Coach
, yesterday, when he stated
plowed portion of the land
of Ferry Field will be put
nd given to the R. O. T. C.
e as a. drill field. The addi-
is facility will greatly aid
'te unit. I hope to be able
aCoch Yost before I leave
as him if it will be possi-
all a rifle range in the new
s to be built on Ferry Field."
Has Mae Progress
elly said that the local ex-
had made -some decided
advance during the past
hat it was confidently ex-
L the unit here would take
among the bodies of the
n the next few years. He
considerable amount of lee-
se the Michigan unit is new,
s not the backing of mili
tions which other schools
t of per cent enrolled in the
courses and total enroll-
wigan is second with 17 per
ntlnued Major Nelly "At
Iorthwestern university is
L37 Per, cent, but Illlinos,
largest enrollment in the
as but eight per cent of the
>er enrolled in the advanced
it is expected that by next
/[lchlgan percentage will be
enty-five."
igan Enrollment Small
chigan enrollment is small,
g but 464 members at pres-
r Arthur expects that this
ase to more than 600 next
amost phenomenal increase.
a we have the largest sen-
the country, at the Univer-
inois, there being 2,800 en-
e, and the largest junior unit
ntry, at the Chicago High
Ilinois, however, is a land-
ool, and military work is
y for. the first two years.
1t also has a wealth of mili-
ions to rely upon."
Michigan unit, will improve
xt couple coming years as
it has done during the past
e is no doubt but that it
ne the greatest unit in the
Thls Is what we expect at
ers, and look upon Mihigan
atIon of our beliefs."
Alng several new and orig-
res in composition and de-
lichiganensan for 1922 will
appearance on the campus
two months, according to
Frey, '22, editor of the year
y the most conspicuous of
are are the ilustrations done
XVan Every, '24, which are
splay in the lobby of the Li-1
ither with copies of other
s and old Michiganensians.
done in black and white in
designs which will lend an
inctilon to the boo.
Prent departments have re-
air material this year from
inent in each line and the
ive been written by men who
experience in the various
This Is a departure from the
past years when the articles
ten entirely by men on the

The outstanding feature of the- local
dramatic season will be the appear-
ance at the Whitney Theatre on Sat-
urday, Feb. 26, of Leo Ditrichstein
in the most artistic triumph of his
brilliant career, "The Great Lover."
This important engagement is made
possible because of the advantageous
railroad location of this city which
chances to be on the route the dis-
tinguished star has selected for his
tour to the Pacific Coast, where he
will spend the summer presenting old
-and new plays.
"The Great Lover," which gives an
intimate view of the lives of tempera-
mental persons in grand opera, has
been received as one of the most not-
able achievem'nts in the American
theatre. In the part of Jean Paurel,
the great baritone who loses his voice,
Mr. Ditrichstein has attained his great-
est artistic heights in character de-
lineation.
"The Great Lover," which is the
joint work of Mr. Ditrichstein and
Frederic and Fannie Hatton, is in
three acts. The first is devoted to
illustrating the various types of tem-
peramental characters which besiege
an operatic impresario's office. The
second act provides an intimate view
of the life of an artist behind the
scenes, and the third is laid in the
star's apartment in a hotel.
FIVE:NATIONS ERECTING
EDROITIRN BUILINGS
BRAZIL WORLD'S FAIR SCENE OF
/ PREPARATIONS FOR
CENTENNIAL
New York, Feb. 24.-Five nations, in-
cluding the United States, have started
erection of palaces at Rio de Janeiro
for the international exposition next
fall in commemoration of the centen-
nial of Brazilian independence, ac-
cording to word received by Helio
Lobo, Brazilion consul general.: The
foreign buildings are being constructed
along the Avenida Wilson.
A fund of $1,000,000 has been estab-~
lished to provide an adequate exhibit
on the part of the United States. Sup-
plemental to the national display,
many American manufacturers will
show their goods.
France, Great Britain, Belgium and
Italy are the other countries which
have buildings under construction and'
several smaller nations have arranged
for exhibits in other structures on the
exposition ground, so that the centen-
nial will have the atmosphere of a
world's fair.
The exposition is to be an expres-
sion of the economic and social life
of Brazil during the last 100 years.
Each of the 21 states of that republic
will have separate displays of its
achievements in commerce, industry
and other aspects of civilization.
THE UNIVERSITY'S
COMMON HEALTH
Droplet' Infection (Cont.)
Under Athe caption "Bacteria of the
Air in an Amusement Hall," Lieuten-
ants Huddleston and Hull will give the
results of their experiments conducted
in the auditorium of a Y. M. C. A.
amusement hall located in Coblenz,
Germany, and used by our soldiers.
The auditorium in this amusement hall
seated 2,000 and it was filled to capac-
ity every evening during the period
of the experiments.
Study Army Epidemic
"In February, 1919, there existed in
the army of occupation what amounted
to an epidemic of severe colds with
extremely bad coughs and sore throats.
Pneumonia cases were numerous."
Open plates containing bacterial me-
dium were exposed in this hall when
it was filled with the "coughing and
sneezing soldiers." It was found that
the air was so badly contaminated
that an average of 82 organisms fell
on these plates during one minute of

exposure. Among the organisms were
pneumococi-the chief cause of
pneumonia and staphylocci. "Eight
days later after the epidemic had sub-
sided only an average of 17 colonies
developed on, the plates exposed under
similar conditions but for a period of
ten minutes. Sixteen per cent of these
colonies were streptococci."
These studies show the enormous
contamination of air in crowded rooms
by dangerous bacteria during the
"coughing and sneezing season."."Any
man susceptible to the prevailing dis-
eases under such conditions could not
help hut contract theserdiseases by sit-
ting through a performance ®f one,
and a half or two hours."
Similar observations have been made
by many other investigators.
Phi Tau Club Now Organized
A new campus organization has late-
ly come into existence under the name
of the Phi Tau Club, composed of uni-
versity men of all departments. At
the present time it has 12 members.
Its objects are very similar to those
of a' campus fraternity and meetings
are held each Wednesday evening at
the Union.

ALUMNUS CONTAINS
DIVERSE ARTICLES
An account of the J-Hop and a re-
view of the services of Frederick P.
Jordan and Myra B. Jordan are the
headline features of this week's issue
of the Alumnus now in the mails.
A summary of the plans of the Uni-.
versity for the coming summer session,
an account of the experiences of Jun-
ius Wood, '00, who spoke to the stu-
dents of Journalism in, Ann Arbor,
Feb. 17, an article on the new Union
play-house, and a discussion of the
plans for the Women's League build-
ing, are all given prominent parts in
this week's issue. The article on the
Women's League building contains a
summary of the plans of construction
and a description of the interior and

exterior of the structure.
Short articles on the honor sys-
tem in the literary college, an account
of the sports for the past two weeks,
and the report of the January meet-
ing of the Regents are also made a
part of this number.

.
;
"
t,
i
rt

Riding

Brel

HLSt '! M

Knickers. and
Knicker Suits

DANA E HISCOCK
DEALER IN
HARD And SOFT
COA L
WOOD AND COKE
Kentucky Egg, Pocahontas,
Manhattan Egg, West Vir-
ginia Lump, Solvay Coke,
Good Clean Hard Coal.
PHONE'109F2

We are headquarters for Sport, Hiking and
Ladies and Men and have them in a large as
ected materials as Serge, Tweed, Corduroy,
cord, Khaki, etc. Also Sport Hose, Leather
tees. Sloes, High-Top and Moccasin Pac
ad Men.

FOR '

TELEPHONE 214 F-1

TOM WYE COATS

Sweaters, Knit Coats and Vests in every style at lowest
Regulation 0. D. Wool Army Shirts, Dress Shirts, Underwea
Gloves, Wool Blankets and Auto Robes.
Leather Briel and Music Cases and Boston Rags.

SurlusSuppie Store, 213 N.
"rIt pays tio walk a few blocks"

*. t

__

UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron St.
SIDNEV S. ROBINS, Minister
Feb. 26, 1922
"THE EVERLASTING PROB-
LEM" is the problem of salva-
tion in its hundred different
forms.r
This Sunday, Feb. 26., 10:40 A.M.
How the Problem Appeared to
Jesus.
PROFESSOR O. J. CAMPBELL,
speaks at 6:00 P. M. on "The
Unpractical Idealist's View of
Life." Supper 5:30.
"Others may love; Christ for
mysterious attributes: I love-
him for the rectitude of his soul
and his life."-Wm. E. Channing.

SUNDAY'S CHURCH SERVICES

na

Oori~ ,..

and

What Others.

Say:

FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
Huron, Below State
/R,
B. EDWARD SAYLES, Minister

The Living, Church
-From Charles Rann Kennedy's "The Servant in the House."
"I am afraid you may not consider it an altogether substantial concern
It has to be seen in a certain way, under certain conditions. Some people
never see it at all. You must understand this is no dead pile of stones and
unmeaning timber.; It is a living thing. When you enter it you hear a sound-
a sound as of some mighty poem chanted. Listen long enough, and you will
learn that it is made up of the beating of human hearts, of the nameless music
of men's. souls-that is, if you have ears. If you have eyes you will presently
see the church itself-a looming mystery of many shapes and shadows, leaping
sheer from floor to dome. The work of no ordinary builder!
The pillars of it go up like the brawny trunks of heroes: the sweet human
flesh of men and women is moulded upon its b'ulwarks, strong, impregnable:
the faces of lttle children laugh out" from every cornerstone: the terrible
spans and arches of it are the joined hands of comrades; and up in the heights
and spaces there are inscribed the numberless musings of all the dreamers of
the world. It is yet building-building and built upon. Sometimes the work
goes forward in deep darkness; sometimes in blinding light; now beneath the
burden of unutterable anguish; now to the tune of great laughter and heroic
shoutings like the cry of thunder. Sometimes in the silence of the night-time,
one may hear the tiny hammerings of the comrades at work up in the dome-
the comrades that have climbed ahead."

7:35 A. M.-Holy
10:30 A. M.--Morn:
and Sermon, by t
uel S. Marquis, ]
4:30 P. M.-Eveni
and Address 1
Charles T. Webb
in the Christian
Venerable Bede.'
6:00 P. M.-Stude
Harris Hall.
Marquis.

ANN
BIBLI

AD
"UPPER R(

10:30-"Looking Unto the ]=Tills."
Mr. Sayles.
12:00 - Sunday School. Guild
Class in the Guild House.
X4:00-Junior B, Y. P. U.
5:30-Senior B. Y. P. U.
6:00-Guild Social and Devo-
tional Meeting.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
REV. ARTHUR -W. STALKER, D.D., Pastor
BISS ELLEN W. MOORE, Student Director

BIBLE (
LANE

10:30 A. M.

Pastor's Subject: "OTHER'S CLAIMS UPON' YOU"
Speial )s( a"Largd" (From the New World Sym-
phony) (vrk, Miss Struble and Mr. Brooks; "Ben-
edictus" (Gounod), the chorus; "Blessed Jesu" (From
Stabat Mater), the chorus; "Recordare" (From Re-
quiem Mass (Dvorak), Mrs. Wheeler, Miss Howe, Mr.
Wheeler, Mr. Williams.
,BIBLE SCHOOL. Four Student Classes. Teachers: Doc-
tor Stalker, Miss Moore, Professor Waterman, Doctor
Iden.

See
tin

"Upper A
and Printe

Sunday Class for
9:30 to 10

12:00 Noon.

6:00 P. M. SHORT SOCIAL TIME.

6:15 P. M.

WE'SLEYAN GUILD DEVOTIONAL MEETING.
MR. EARL MILES. y

Leader:

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CNUROH

I

(MO. SYNOD)
Oor. Third and West Huron St.
C, ,. BRAUER, Pastor
9:30 A. M.-Public Worship
(German).
10:30 A. M.-Bible School.
11:30 A. M.-Public Worship.
Subject: "The Way to True
Greatness."
7:30 P. M.-Subject.: "The Ag-
ony in the Garden."
Weanesday Evening at 7:30:-
Topic: "Behold the Lamb of
God: That Taketh Away the
Sins of the World" (German).
WELCO

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION

I

South

1a

Rev. Leonard A. Barrett, Minister
Lewis C. Reimann, Secretary Men Students
Miss Esther D. Nyland, Secretary Women Students
REV. HENRY SEYMOUR BROWN, D.D.,
of Chicago, will speak on
"SHALL THE UNITED STATES BE BALKANIZED?"
Student Class
12:00
PROF. W.. D. HENDERSON will speak on
"NEW TESTAMENT SOURCES"
All Students are Welcomed
Social Hlf-Hour at 6:00. Program at 6:30.
YOUNG PEOPLE'S MEETING
DR. W. CLYDE SMITH, of Chicago, will show pictures of settlement
and Vacation Bible School work in which University students can
enlist next summer.

Bible School at 9:30 A
Moyning Worship at 1
Rev. H. R. Chapman
tlie morning service.
Students' Classes' at
both men and woy
University Men wi
"The Democratic
for which Elijah C
Christian Endeavor at

rI

L~

ZION LUTHERAN
Fitth Ave. and Washington St.'
E . .STELLHORN,
Pastor
"No matter how dark the clouds,
how bitter the task, how heavy
the sorrow, God's sunshi ex of
love, his help, is ever near to
save." This love and help we find
in Jesus, our Savior Lord.
9:00 A. M.-Bible Study" Hour.
10:30 A. M'"Self-Sacrifice."
11:30 A. M.-Holy Communion.
5':30 P. M.-Student Forum.
Arthur A. Theurerkauf will
lead in discussing "Self-De-
nial."
7:30 P. M.-"The Passover a
Type of Our Redemption."
All services in English.

'I

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

Filth Ave. and
Rev. L. F. Gund

Morning Worship 10:30 o'clock.
PROF. THOMAS W. GRAHAM, of Oberlin College, will preach.

* *

I

I

The class for University students will meet at noon under the
leadership of MR. GEORGE A. KUYPER.

10:30 A. M.-"The La
to Jerusalem."
6:30 P. M.-Luther I
7:30 P. M.-"What is
Supper.

** * *

There will be no meeting of the Students' Association in the
evening on account of the service in Hill auditorium at 7 o'clock.

.I

I

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