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February 24, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1922 PR

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4tCIL

ADOPTS

ELECTION

Ph

t s

MADE
OUST
HARVEY

IN

MADE
kLFOUR

Shows Himself
poInent of

ALL IN READINESS
FOR ALUMNI BALL
Final arrangements have been com-
pleted for the All-University ball be-
ing given by the Detroit alumni at the
new' Graystone hotel in Detroit Mon-
day night.
The plan, which was )originated by
the Detroit University of Michigan
cl b, is now being backed by alumni
fr m 25 different universities. Mason
P. Rumney, '08E, is president of the
Detroit club, and Carl Johnson, '20, is
secretary.
The patrons and patronesses from
Ann Arbor are: President Marion L.
Burton and Mrs. Burton, Regent Ju-
nius E. Beal and Mrs. Beal, Dean Jo-
seph A. Bursle/ and Mrs. Bursley;
Coach Fielding H. Yost and Mrs.
Yost, Registrar Arthur G. Hall and
Mrs. Hall, Mr. Frederick P. Jordan
and Dean Jordan, and Mr. and Mrs.
Wilfred B. Shaw.
Tickets may be obtained at the
Union or at the alumni office in Me-
morial hall. The price is $5 a couple
and $3 for a single ticket.
HOUSING LAU
RESEINTS CHARGE[S
Local Housekeepers. in Report, Deny
Accusations of Profiteering
on Their Part
RETURN ON CAPITAL INVESTED
SELDOM OVER SIX PER CENT

CONTINUE PROBE
Of AIR DISASTER

(By Associated Press)
ashington, Feb. 23.-A resolution
gned to bring about the recall of
bassador Harvey was introducedl
.y by Representative Ryan, Re-
lican, New York. The measure
>oses a congressional investiga-
of statements made by the aida
ador while abroad with .a view to
ng him detached from his post in
don.
r. Ryan quoted extracts from
s reports of Mr. Harvey's address
he dinner recently given in Lon-
in honor of A. J. Balfour, one of
British delegates to the arms con-
nee, and also referred to remarks
e by the ambassador soon after
arrival in England with reference
he motives which prompted the
ed States to enter the war.
)ntending that various statements
[r. Harvey "reflect discredit on the
and ideals of the spirit that actu-
the citizens of the United States"
constitutes "an attempt to pass
rtions upon the patriotism and
is of American citizens", Mr. Ryan
rte4 that the attitude "of the
rican ambassador has at all times
vn him to be a proponent of Eng-
s aims and ambitions rather than
e of the country he is supposed
epresent.",
YRSITY DELEGATES
ATTEND CONERENCES
culty members of the School of
cation, and women officials of the
'ersity who are attending the ed-
lonal conferences in Chicago this
k and next are as follows:
an Myra B. Jordan, Miss Grace
nwood, of Martha Cook dormitory,
Eleanor Sheldon, of Betsy Bar-
house, Misses Grace Webb and
n Bishop of Helen Newberry res-
ce, Miss Margaret Cameron of the
01 of Education, and Mrs. Harry
er, dean of women of the School
usic, are in attendance atthehNa-
il Association of Deans of Worn-
eld Thursday, Friday and Satur-
of this week. Dean Jordan was
t of honor at an informal lunch-
given at the conference yester-
,culty member s of the School of
ation who will attend the con-
ice of the National Education as-
tion beginning Saturday are: Dean
. Whitney, Dr. Guy M. Whipple,
Jharles Berry, Dr. Calvin 0. Dav-
)r. Janies B. Edmonson, Prof.
ge Myers, Prof. Clifford Woody
Prof. George Jackson. Instruct-
in the department of education
take charge of classes during the
nee of faculty members.
YE PATTERSON TO SPEAK
FORE STUDENTS' PRESS CLUB

Army

Investigating Board Considers
Causes for Crash of .
Airship Roma

Members of the housing league, com-
posed of local housekeepers, have com-
piled a report for the year ending
Sept. 1, 1921, which states that accusa-
tions of profiteering in room rents are
unfounded and have only served to
"awaken suspicion in the minds of stu-
dents an4 patrons," and "to strain the
otherwise friendly relations which
have long existed between the Univer-
sity and the citizens of Ann Arbor."
The report states that upon the fail-
ure of the University to appoint a
committee to investigate conditions,
the work was taken up by the Housing
league to present such matter as was
pertinent and to show beyond a ddubt
that Ann Arbor householders are not
profiteering in rooms, but are actually
"unthanked benefactors" co-operating
with the University to provide whole-
some environment for students. While
prices and cost of maintenance have
increased from 100 to 300 per cent in
(Continued on Page Eight)
MIMES VAUDEVILLE
POSTPONED A WEEK
Illness among the members of the
cast of the Mimes vaudeville makes
it impossible to put on the produc-
tion scheduled for this evening in the
Mimes theater. "Rather than sacri-
fice the quality of the work," said E.
Mortimer Shuter, "we would rather
postpone the vaudeville until some fu-
ture date." Both the Friday and Sat-
urday performances have been post-
poned.
This show was to have been the
first weekend production to appear
at the new theater, which was opened
last Friday night with the Michigan,
Union opera, "Make It for Two." The
members of the cast as well as the
management are disappointed. The
vaudeville, however, will be shown
with the original cast on March 3 and
4 at the Mimes theater.

PREPARE FUNERAL SERVICES.
FOR 34 VICTIMS TODAY
(By Associated Press)
Norfolk, Va.,'Feb. 23.-The investi-
gation by a board of army officers of
the disaster of the semi-rigid Roma.
was continued here today, but no word
was permitted to leak out of the ex-
ecutive session confirming the char-
acter of evidence presented. The board
expects to finish investigation and re-
port to Washington within a sfew
days.
Meanwhile public funeral services
are being prepared for the 34dead at
Newport News ,to be held tomorrow.
All business will be suspended here
and in that city while the brief serv-
ices will be held. Every vestige of the
huge craft which crashed to earth
Tuesday at the Hampton Roads army
base was removed today and part of
the former proud ship of the air were
rem'oved to Newport News, where the
final investigation will be held. It is
expected these parts will be tested to
determine whether there were any de-
fects.
HEAVY LOSS CAUSEDBY
1WEDNESDAYIGHT FIE
ACCURATE ESTIMATE OF DAMAGE
NOT YET MADE; SHOPS
REMAIN CLOSED
Fire which broke out at the Barthel
book store, 336 S. State street, Wed-
nesday night caused heavy loss to the
boo store, the Guy Woolfolk Tailor-
ing shop below, the Dey studio across
the hall, and to the Slater book store.
Mr. Clifton Dey, owner of the Dey
studio, approximated his losses as
follows: damage to mountings $425, to
equipment $300, and to miscellaneous
articles more than $100. He has
enough insurance to cover all his
loss. Mr. Barthell, owner of the book
store in which the fire started, said
that as soon as possible he intended to
determine his policy as to the dis-
posal of the books. . Nearly every
book in his store is badly damaged,
and will probably have to be sold as
second hand.
Mr. Slater, owner of the Slater book
store, said that his loss amounted to
hundreds of dollars, but that the en-
tire loss was covered by insurance.
His book shop remained closed yes-
terday on account of the fire.
The losssto the Woolfolk Tailoring
shop has not yet been made known,
the proprietor of the establishment
being in New York at present. The
shop is still closed.
STUDENT INJURED IN ATTACK
ON CAMPUS WEDNESDAY NIGHT
G. D. Eaton, '23, was attacked about
10:30 o'clock Wednesday night near
the south wing of University hall.
Two men, running up from the rear,
knocked Eaton down. After a short
struggle the pair were evidently
,alarmed, and retreated.
Eaton suffered a severe cut on the
forehead, and minor bruises. The at-
tack occurred in one of the poorly il-.
luminated parts of the campus.
The Student Advisory committee is
investigating.

PROPOSE HOME FOR
JOURNALISM DEPT.
Possibility of h ising the depart-
ment of journalism in a separate build-
ing with all the machinery of a mod-
ern newspaper was the principal topic
discussed at a meeting of the execu-
tive committee of the University Press
club last Tuesday. The committee ex-
pressed favor in regard to the courses
offered but stated that the facilities of
the department were inadequate. A
separate building for the department
of journalism will give some outward
appearance that such a department
exists on the campus, while much of
the University printing which has been
taken care of by private concerns
could be done by this University own-
ed press.
Those present at the meeting were
as follows: President Marion L. Bur-
ton; E. J. Ottaway, of Port Huron;
Stuart Perry, Adrian; Harry Mussel-
white, Monistee; Lee White, Detroit;
and Prof. J. R. Brumm.
SUMMER' SESSION*'
FAULYNAE

News of the Dayt
IN BRIEF
Berkeley, Calif., Feb. 23.-The Uni-
versity of California's athletic stad-
ium will erected near the Greek the-,
ater and will seat 70,000, the board of
regents announced today. The stad-
ium will cost $800,000.
Moscow, Feb. 23.- American food
now is beginning to, tell in the fightj
for lives of children in the famine dis-
tricts where the American relief 4d-
ministration is operating, but else-
where the situation ;is growing more
ghastly every day.
New York, Feb. 23. - Financial
storms in speculative Wall street
which swept the brokerage firm of
Kardos and Burke into bankruptcy last
night hit four more houses today.
London,-Feb. 23.-Sir Erric Geddes,
former first lord of the admiralty and
later minister of transport, formally
resigned his seat in the house of com-
mons today. ,He returned to private
life.

List

of Non - Resident Instructors.
Given Out by Dtan E. H.
Kraus

INCLUDES AIANY EMINENT
SCHOLARS OF THE COUNTRY
Non-resident members of the faculty
fore the 1922 Summer session of the
University have been selected and the
list, as announced by dean E. H.
Kraus, of the Summer session, com-
uprises more than 25 names.
Those instructors who will teach
courses in the literary college for this
Summer session are: Prof. Cephas D.
Allin, of the political science depart-
ment, University of Minnesota; Prof.
Arthur M.. Chickering, of the biology
and geology departments, Albion col-
lege; Prof. Verner Crane, of the
American history department, Brown
university; Prof. Minna E. Jewell, of
the zoology department, Milwaukee-
Downer college; Alice Keener, North-
western university; Prof. Laurence
B. Packard, of the history depart-
ment, University of Rochester; Prof.
Thomas H. Reed, of the municipal gov-
ernment department, University of
California; Prof. Clarence H. Rich-
ardson, of the mathematical depart-
ment, Georgetown college, George-
town, Ky.
Engineering Faculty Named
Those instructors of the College of
Engineering and Architecture are as{
follows:, Emma. Grattan, superisor of
public school art, Cedar Rapids, Ia.;
Viola Ludwig, assistant in public
school art, Cedar Rapids, Ia.; and Jean
Paul Slusser, lecturer on free-hand.
drawing and painting in t'he College of'
Architecture, New York City.
For the School of Education the.
following non - resident instructors
have been secured: Leslie Anderson
Butler, superintendent of schools, Ann
Arbor; Stuart A. Courtis, dean of
Teachers' college, Detroit; Prof. Earlj
Hudelson, West Virginia university;{
Arthur B. Moehlman, director of sta-
tistics and references, Detroit; Paul
C. Packer, formerly assistant super-'
intendent of schools, Detroit; Kenneth
G. Smith, state supervisor of industrial
education, Lansing; and Prof. Clar-
ence S. Yoakum, of the applied psy-
chology department and director of
the bureau of personnel research,
Carnegie Institute of Technology.
Law Faculty Announced
For the law department of the Uni-
versity, Prof. George P. Costigan, Jr.,F
Northwestern university; Prof. Henry
J. Fletcher, University of Minnesota,
and Prof. Iugo C. Horack, University
of Iowa, have been secured.
Clara Eliza Howard, librarian of the
Schneley High school, Pittsburgh,
and Frank K. Walter, librarian of the
University of Minnesota, have been se-
cured to teach library methods.
Those instructors who have charge
of the Biological station are as fol-
lows : Prof. Frank C. Gates, of the
botany department, Kansas State Ag-
ricultural college; Margaret T. Gates,'
dean of women at the Biological sta-
tion, Manhattan, Kas.; Prof. Robert
Matheson, of the entomology depart-
ment, Cornell university; Prof. George
E. Nichols, of the 'botany department
in the Sheffield scientific school, Yale
university; and Prof. Frank Smith, of
the zoology department, University of

ALL NATIONS VODOl
TO BE, GIvEN MARCH1
EVENT WILL BE PRODUCED WITH
SPECTACULAR STAGE
SETTINGS

PROJ WES CHECKS TO GUARD AGAINI
CHANCE FOR FRAUD; RESI'STRAI
NECESSARY BEFORE BALLOT IS

Spectacular sword play, Hawaiian
mu lc, native dancing, and bits of
the Orient will feature the program of
the All-Nations Vodvil performance,
for March 2 in Hill audit'orium. Spec-
ial stage stage settings are being pre-
pared for the realistic presentation of
acts of the foreign students' clubs.
Gorgeous costumes will lend color to
the varied program which promises to
be the best ever offered by the Cosmo-
politan clubs. The production this
year has been placed in the hands of
paid management.
The committee in charge announces
the program as follows:
Japanese Clu'
Old and New Japan..Jap ese students
South African club
Cello ..............Robert Rein, '24D
Accompanist, Jean H."Cilliers, '24D
Chinese Club.
Native Instrumental Selections
S. C. Ho, Grad., S. N. Ho, Grad.,,
Li Y Hu, Grad. '
Highland Sword Dance......
.......Winifred Smeaton, '24
Accompanist, Mrs. W. G. Smeaton
Hawaiian Club
Honolulu Blues......... Instrumental
Cyrus N. Tavares, '24, Dwan Y. Tang,,
'24E
Hindu Club.
Sword Wizardry....A.K. Savant, Spec.
Polish Dance.. Winifred Smeaton, '24
Male Quarette
L. Lane, '23, H. E. Bellis, '23,
W. J. Nichols, '23, H. J. Potter, '22
Accompanist, H. Rath, '22
Union Or estra
Tickets will be on sale in the book-'
%tores on Tuesday and on the campus
Wednesday and Thursday.
BIOS BEING RECEIVED
FOR NEW FIELD HOUS
i Bids for the erection of the new
field house on Ferry field are now be-
ing received from various architects
by Fielding H. Yost, director of ath-
letics.
Nothing farther can be done on the
buiiding until the. Board in Control of
Athletics approves the plans and votes
the necessary funds to permit con-
struction, work to start. As soon as all
of the bids are considered, the most
satisfactory one will be submitted to
the board for approval.
If the board approves of the. plans,
the contract will be let immediately

OFFICIAL STAMP AND E
OF MATCHING STUBS
AMONG CHANGES
DECIDE ON SYSTEM 01
PICKING CHEERLEAD
Nide Men to Be Admitted to $
Will Have Uniforms and
kceompany Teams
A system of voting which w
sure honesty in campus election
adopted by the Student council
meeting held last night at the'
The plan as passed was only :
ly changed from the original pr
ed to the council at its last in
held two weeks ago.
Secret balloting is in no. w
dangered by the new system,
who originated it declare. The
cil, in fact, declares that the ne
affords even greater secrecy tha
yet employed on the campus.
Registration Required.
According to the new pro
registration will be a requisit
voting, in all elections. The rei
tion will be held a few weeks
the actual balloting. In regisi
which will' be done by classe
student must present his receipi
the treasurer of the University
athletic book from which his
will be taken to compile a list
gible voters, These lists will be
fully audited by 'class officers a
,members of the Student counc
held until the time- of election.
Each class will register and
separate booths at which wi
present two class officers to su
the balloting. Each ballot ,wit
provided with a stub. When voti
student must turn in the stub
officers in charge. This featur
vrides "a check on the number qa
lots that should be in the box
Eacit Ballot Stamped
As. each ballot will be stampe
cially at the' time- it is given I
voter, thrse which do not beai
stamp will be discarded, thus i4
it impossible for anyone to vote
than once. As each student cas
ballot, his name will be check
on the registration lists.
The votes will be first count
the officers of the class and then
ed over to the Student council
recount. Possibility of fraud i
quarter is thus destroyed. Ther
be different iallbts for men and
en, 'each carrying the names of
the office for which they are el
to vote.
This plan; now complete, has
under consideration, bya con
of the Student council for ove
weeks. The final resolutions a
committee drew them up . met
unanimous favor. The new s:
will go into effect this spring fo
year's elections. It is planne
have registration take place ea
the fall in succeeding years.
New Cheerleader Plan
Student council approved plani
mitted by the Boosters club for
ing cheerleaders and awarding
insignia. According to these :
nine members will be admitted 1
cheering squad including a l
three of whom will be assistants
five tryouts. Each year after the
ball season, the cheeileader w
chosen from the three assistar
the previous year, and three ne
sistants will be chosen from th
tryouts.
The members of the cheering -
will be supplied with uniform
sent on the varioustrips with
teams by the Bosters club. A
will be raised on the campus a
subscription from the merchant
the city for.this purpose. These
are in accordance with those ni
use' in several of the other Conf
schools. The resolution also pr
that the cheerleader each year
receive the same reward as the
gers of the teams.
FLOODED DISTRICT AROUND
MUSIKEGON IT BY COLD 1

Muskegon, Mich., Feb. 23.-We
Michigan which for two days b
with floods tonight is in the gr
a severe blizzard. The temperat
steadily falling. City Engineer
today said the damage caused ,l
flood in Muskegon had been exa
ated and that it would not reach

of Detroit Journal,)

t for Tuesd
Ight
, managin.g
urnal, will
ncheon of t
which will
:15 o'clock
ccording to
by James
t of the cl

g.
aper
if yea
suran
st to
other
z.

120 Sudent Dismissed in Annual
eeditorWeeding Out In Literary College
be the
he Stu-
be held
Tuesday Out of the 152 students in the liter- were men and 9 were women, or, more
an an- ary college who received notices to than 90 per cent of those dismissed
A. Gal- call at the office of the assistant dean were men. The number of students
lub. Mlcltheoffeofstheisatean dismissed is approximately 80 per cent
ub. Mr of the college to present their reasons of the t"tal number receiving notice
Making if they had any why they should be from the dean's office.
Hle has
work in permitted to remain in the University More than 250 students, other than
ars, and even though their work was notably those who have withdrawn from the
ce that poor, 120 have been dismissed. The literary college "on request," have left
all stu- remaining 32 have been granted per- the college. Many have finished their
rs inter- mission to continue their 'work in work and are eligible for graduation
the University on probation. and at the next meeting of the Board
Notices were sent out yesterday of Regents A.B. degree will be recom-
NG morning to all those 152 and should be mended for 46, two students will be
TODAY at their destinations not later than this recommended for the degree of Bachel-
afternoon. The decision in each of or of Science an one for the degree of
ost part the 152 cases was left to the adminis- Bachelor of Science in medicine. The
e Board trative board of the literary college other students who have withdrawn
ird will which met last Tuesday and took up have left for financial reasons, or are
s' room each student's reasons individually. transferinr to other shnnl sna on-

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