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February 21, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-02-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I it

d1e on V elox.
Eastman made and meth-
a approved, plus the ex-
rrts are guaranties of fin-
your films
!IA51HAD .1905
T EY-
RMANCE ONLY
ening Feb. 25

':

IN "IS $IGGSr SUC~S
Great Love,
OVMAITIC COAMrnw '*.Aire,

UOLEY SPEAKING TRIP
I SOUTH ENS M.11
ADDRESSES ENGINEERING SOC-
ETIES AND SCHOOLS OF
SECTION
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, of the
colleges of engineering and architec-
ture, who left the city two weeks ago
on a speaking tour of the South, is ex-
pected to return to the city on March
11. During his tour, the Dean is ad-
dressing many engineering organiza-
tions on behalf of the Federated Amer-
lcan Engineering societies, of which'
he is 'resident, in addition t visiting
a number of colleges and meeting
Michigan alumni groups as a repre-
sentative of the University.
Visits any Cities
St. Louis, Mo.; Kansas City, Mo.;
Lawrence, Kan.; Topeka, Kan.; Wichi-
ta, Kan.; Oklahoma City, Okla.; Dallas,
Tex.; Austin, Tex., and Houston, Tex.,
are a'mong the cities in which Dean
Cooley has spoken during his trip.
Dean Cooley will spend the week in
Louisiata and Alabama. After ad-
dressing the Louisiana Technical so-
ciety, Baton Rouge, and students of
Tulane University, New Orleans, he
will go to Montgomery, Ala. He will
spend the weekend at the camp of
former governor Chase S. Osborn, at
Poulan, Ga. From this point he will
visit the federal nitrate plant at Muscle
Shoals, Ala.
Dean Cooley will meet the executive
committee of the American Society of
Mechanical Engineers at Atlanta,.Ga.,
Feb. 28. The next day he will ad-
dress the Atlanta Affiliated Technical
societies. He will also address the
Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta,
on Mar. 2.
Spreaks Often
On Mar. 4 the Dean will speak be-
fore the Alabama Technical school, at
Birmingham, Ala. He will talk to the
engineering students of Vanderbilt
university, Nashville, Tenn., the En-
gineers' association of Nashville, and
the Nashville chapter of the American
Association of Engineers, on Mar. 6.
University of Kentucky students will
hear Dean Cooey on Mar. 7 and 8.
He will spend the next day at Indian-
apolis as the guest of the Michigan
alumni organization there.
The Michigan Engineers club of Chi-
cago will hold its annual meeting Mar.
10. The Dean will stop in Chicago
to attend this gathering, returning the
next day to Ann Arbor.
CQNIILERCE CLUB MAY TAKE
OVER EMPLOY1ENT BUREAU
Organization is Actively Seeking Jobs
and Summer Places for
Students'
The Commerce club is now in
charge of an employment bureau. Al-
though the economics department is
still conducting such a bureau, the
chances are that the Commerce club
will eventually take over this work,
according to Harry N. Rath,''22, presi-
dent of the organization.
At the present time this organiza-
tion is sending out letters to different
industrial conce'rns in different cities
of the United States, and also to vari-
ous communities. The purpose of this
correspondence is to obtain informa-
tion concerning the worth-while and
responsible positions that may 1'e open.
In this way many students may ob-
tain -summer employment and also,
graduates may step into paying posi-
tions. No positions ar open at the
present time, however. The economics
department is h nding over letters that
they receve to the Commerce club.

THE UNIVERSITY'S
COMMON HEALTH
RESPIRATORY DISEASES III
Great progress has been made in the
control of diseases which depend for
their spread on some specific inter-
mediate agent, such as insects. For
example: bubonic plague-the "black
death" of history, at one time the
greatest "scourge" of mankind, is no
longer greatly feared in our country
because precautionary measures are,
taken to prevent it entering our ports.
Bubonic plague is not "contagious,"
but is spread by rodents and fleas.
Yellow fever, "not long ago the death
trap of the tropics, now gives promise
of becoming 'an historical disease, for
man has detected, and is successfully
combating its specific carrier, the Ste-
gomyia. Malaria, also, is being con-1
quered by effective campaigns against
the Anopheles, the agents which carry
the malarial parasites.
Little has been accomplished so far,
however, in the eradication or even
control of respiratory infections and
other diseases spread either directly'
or indirectly in discharges from the
mouth and nose. These are responsi-
ble for at least one-fourth of the na-
tion's annual death toll. Each year
at least three hundred thousand people
die in the United States from diseases
spread by discharges from the mouth
and nose. The number more or less
incapacitated each year as a conse-
quence of respiratory disorders would
probably be more than ten million. The
control of diseases spread by dis-
charges from the mouth and nose (hu-
man contact infection) is now of first
importance to the community health.
The U. S. geovernment maintains
135' schools in Alaska with an expendi-
ture of about a half million dollars
and an enrollment of 6,899.

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