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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 19, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"All Art Is Good," Says Professor;
Declares America Active In field

I

We Carry,

Trading

I-

ow 35 Cents.
Every Passenger Insured
Against Accident
[ITNEY THEATRE
NDAY, FEBRUARY 9
SAM H. HARRIS Presents
Is I. COBMAS COMEDIAN
the Biggest Musical it on Earth

(By Associated Press)
Des Moines, Ia., Feb. 19.-Pro-
fessor Richard Enersti, head of the
department of art of Drake Univers y
here, is of the opinion that all art,
whether it is considered good or bad,,
is good. He further says that all peo-
ple who try to express themselves in
terms of beauty, . through color or
form, are doing much to make better
citizens of themselves and quite often
of others.
Professor Enersti says that America
has as fine art as any country in the
world.

In answer to the question: "what is
bad art, and why?" Professor Enersti
says:
"It is exceedingly difficult to estab-
lish an art standard, but considering
art from the standpoint of sanity-ex-
cluding such fits as "dadaism," expres-
sionisra, which ought to be called de-
pressionism, and other mental aberra-
tions into' art realms-in fact, taking
art up to the time of Monet and Manet
inclusive, we might say 'all art is
good.' It depends, of course, alto-
gether on the number of milestones
you have passed in your evolution of
appreciation and judgment."

on Margin.

-IN-

STOCKS

BONDS

Many traders are making quick money in WHEAT
$100 controls 1,000 bushels of wheat and every cent
nets the account $10. Making $10 or $20 a day is
by a great many. This is the time for profitable

I9

r

1Oe

) -
(SN'T IT A GRAND OLD NAMEft
50-PEOPLE--O AUGMENTED ORCHESTRA,
A WHIRLWIND OF SPEED AND "PEP" CHORUS
" The Wonder-Show of All Times"
Prices $1.00 TO $2.50 Seats Selling
..

NO FUNDS SPARED
ON '22 'ENSIA N
"No expense is being spared to make
the 1922 Michiganensian the equal of
annual in America," said Robert F. W
annual in America," said Robert F. Wie-
neke, '22, business manager, yesterday.
"Prinmed on the best of paper,, with the
almost professional art which students
are executing for it, the 'Ensian is not
going to fall short of the high expec-
tations placed on it.
"Inquiries as to how we get out
the annual are coming in daily," he
continued, "and only recently a group
of people from Detroit Teachers'. insti-
tute were here to inspect the prepara-1
tions we are making."
In connection with the discussions,
especially in the senior class, con-
cerning the running of extra prints,
Wieneke stated that the class con-
cerned is expected to pay the charges.
The cost of these prints is 50 cents
each and they may be obtained from
the photographer who made the origi-
nal pictures.
FRATERNAL CONGRESS WILL
HOLD NATIONAL CONVENTION
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Teb. 19.-More than eight
million people in the United States
and Canada will be represented
through fraternal organizations at the
mid-winter meeting of the National
Fraternal Congress of America, *hich'
will convene here next Monday, Tues-i
day and Wednesday. Ninety-three,
organizations will be represented.,
The congress will be divided into
five meetings. , The presidents' sec-
tions holds one session, as the leaders,
which will be followed by meetings of
secretaries, medical directors, and fra-
ternal editors. In addition, the Fra-
ternal Society Law association meets
on Wednesday and Thursday. Thti'
section is composed of fraternal legal
authorities. ,
I

A GOOD

N STEN

'I,

BUY

AN

OVERCOAT

THE UNIVERSITY'S
COMMON HEALTH
ItESPIRATORY DISEASES II
Our long winters, which are respon-
sible for the excessive indoor life of
the student make it imperative that
special care be exercised at the Uni-
versity of Mi-chigan to minimize respi-
ratory infections. The University
Health service asks the co-operation
of every student and every member
of the faculty'in guarding against and
controlling these infections and in the
avoidance of such epidemics which
have occurred during the past.
From s §dies of the morbidity re-
ports of The University of Michigan,
Cornell University, the University of
Minnesota, and other institution, the
following' situation so far as students'
health is concerned, occurs each year:
Immediately after school begins
there is a rapid spread of respiratory
infections, in the nature of "colds in
the head" (coryza), "sore throats"
(tonsilitis or laryngitis), and bronchi-
tis. ghe peak of these respiratory
infeetions-.is reached about the middle
of November and from' then on de-
creases until the Christmas holidays.
When ,school convenes after, the holi-
days; there is a second rapid increase
of respiratory diseases, which.reaches
its maximum about the first of Febru-
ary and then gradual decreases. (A
third wave is introduced after the
spring vacation.
What is the cause of these distinct
periods or waves of respiratory infec-
tions? When students congregate in
the autumn- a few bring with them
to the University infectious colds,
which are -highly communicable. ' As
a result of close association in class
rooms and . at social gatherings, and
because of carelessness on the part
of those having colds, the respiratory
infections are spread rapidly until all
susceptible students are affected. This
may be termed the "peak" of the in-
fection. The decrease following this
"peak" is due to recovery, tolerance
for the particular organism introduced
and the establishment of immunity so,
far as these organisms are concerned.
The second wave, following the
Christmas holidays, is due to the in-
troduction of some new '"trains of
bacteria which are gathered by stu-
dents here and there in various locali-
ties. These new organisms are grought
to the University, and again there is
more or less of an epidemic of infec-
tious respiratory diseases until all
susceptible ptudents are affected..
Again the decrease following the
beak" is noted. The third wave oc-
curs in the same manner.
PART TIME STUDY ALLOWANCE
ANNULS FORMER REGULATIONS
Students With Limited Time May Elect
'Not More Than Five Hours for
Annual Fee of $25
By a decree of the Board of Regents
passed at its last meeting, persons
whose occupations are such asto af-
ford them a limited part of their time
for study, are duly accredited for
admission to any school, or college
of the University, providing they evi-
dence an interest in study wholly in
accord with the purpose of the college
or school. These students may elect
not more than five hours work, the
annual fee for the payment of which
having been changed from $10 to $25.
,Such students if entering for the
first time, however, mlust also pay the;
usual matriculation fee as the $25
covers only the privileges of study and
tuition.,
With the exception of the provisions
for the exemption from fees of certain
members of the faculties, all legisla-
tion affecting part time enrollment is
no longer operative, graduate students
who are taking extension courses,
studying in absentia, or working on
theses without studies in course, are
not regarded as part time students,
however, and legislation in regard to
them continues operative.
Old French Vessels Sold

Cherbourg, Feb. 18.-French naval
torpedo boats and. destroyers of an
obsolete type are being sold for prices
eauivalent to $800 tw $1,600. Some of
them are being fitted out for use as
yachts.
You'll find many bargains when you
read Michigan Daily Ads.-Adv.

MR. LW.

.rr

Iw NIpip- IM IN IS B1
s'uccEs
S17Ihe GREAT
WOVER~
t7he Romantic
L C medy'

THE DRAMATIC EVENT
Of: TWE SEASON. A.
GREAT AQTIST I W.A
GPEAT PLAY "

ST OF OUR~ ACTORlS Or GA
)Y, Mp tITQICIST@ EI PAYl
kTCR4FO M PRMCSION AN

TWE
AmvLe

PRICES: $100, $1R50, $2.0, $2.51
MAIL ORDERS NOW

1503

ONE PERFORMANC
Saturday Even'g,

MIL Ll£S1

p

LANGLEY HILDNER &
FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG.
Direct wire to all markets.

Less 33 1-3%

t best writing paper
t tan be made-
bettor soes-
{TATIONCSV
{VTY A1WOQVYIJVV
0. DA Morrill
Nickl@S .!rcade

)

Hill £A
Wednesday-

I,

Tickets at Union,
FInish the Unit
Goldwns
Sen on

WADHAMS &

Co:

.. n; r I Y i IYm+I4
i. 5
r
YIIYYI Y YY 11 I I I C I I YYYY I ryIlYYY1 p lY

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~

Hans Kindler

Renowned
Dutch
Violoncellist

Soloist with the Detroit Symphony ,rchestra in recital
at Hill Auditorium, Monday even ng, February 20..
Makes Victor Records,
What greater proof of the superiority of Victor products
than that the greatest artists make records only for the
Victor Co. Greatest satisfaction is certain to be yours
if 'you choose a VICTROLA..
Victrolas $25 to $995--on Easy Terms
Come in-we'll gladly play any Kindler records. or
or others you may wish from our large' stock. Or
phone us (1707) and we'll deliver them 'to you. Cour-
teous, wholly pleasing service.
EVERYTHING IN THE REALM OF. MUSIC
116 S. MAIN ST.
DETROIT: 1515 Woodward Ave. YPSILANTI: 210 W. Michigan Ave.

Sardou'S inmo
love StOy
For a moment of Love she
ficed an Empire! It dazzl
eye, words are too futile fo
cription.
A Galaxy of European S
Theodora is presented und
auspices of the Veterans M
Committee. Procee<
toward completing the 1
Reading Room. Special b

r

,4

I

>

HIS VICTOR RECORDS
"Simple Confession"
"Fond Recollections"
"Le Cygne" (The Swn)
"Menuett" ,
"A Dream"
"Nina"
"Melody in F"
"Gavotte"
"Song Without Words"
I"Orie tale"
"Traumerei"

/ I ,
Il r r

N1

i

Lr i® r

For Electrical
Repair Call the

Wslitenaw Electric Shop,.

Telephone 273
200 E. Washington

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