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March 26, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
PARTLY CLOUDY; NO
TEMPERATURE CHANGE

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS

DAY AND NIGHT IRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 122. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 26, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTS

7

GET STORY BIK
TELLS DELEGATES
DETROIT NEWS EDITOR OUTLINES
FUTURE DEVELOPMENT
IN JOURNALISM
PI DELTA EPSILON GIVES'
CHARTER TO HAMILTON
Representatives from Both Coasts
Attend Gathering of College
Newspapermen
Declaring that the newspaper man
of the future must "get at the story
behind the story," Malcolm W. Bin-
gay, managing editor of the Detroit
News, outlined what he conceives as
the necessary future developments in
journalism if it is to be a force toward
a better civilization, in a speech giv-
en at the initiation banquet of the
national convention of Pi Delta Epsi-
lon, held last night in the Union.
The public must be taught to read
the paper declared Mr. Bingay. When
they have learned not only to read
but to let the printed word penetrate,
to really think, sensationalism in jour-
nalism will go, he believes.
Sane Crime Stories
Mr. Bingay further stated that he
believed it to be the duty of the news-
paper to handle crime stories, but that
they should be handled in a sane man-
ner, To exclude these stories entirely
would not only encourage crime, but
would bring much criticism on the
basis that the press was suppressing
news because those implicated were
financial powers, and that the press
was subsidized by them.
Mr. Bingay emphasized the increase
in the number of college men now
found in newspaper offices, stating
that when he entered the journalistic
profession a college trained journal-
ist was almost a curiosity, while now
a large per cent have had a college ed-
ucation.
Grant Charter
Other speakers of the evening were
C. Stewart Baxter, '21, who acted as
toastmaster, Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson,
of the English department, E. A.
Baumgarth, '17, of the Detroit News,
Harlan Johnson, editor of the Ann
Arbor Times News, Mark Ehlbert, '20,
national president of Pi Delta Epsi-
lon, and Frank Bartlett, a representa-
tive from California.
Delegates to the convention from
out of town are W. J. Dalton, Syra-
cuse, R. A. Curry, Columbia, W. B.
Lindsay, Lawrence college, R. G.
Gregory, Colgate, E. H. Hathaway, To-
ronto, F. S. Williams, Lawrence col-
lege, W. G. Colgate, Toronto, G. C.
Patty, M. I. T., O. H. Hicks, Dart-
mouth, P. L. Powell, Ohio Wesleyan,
L. B. Sherman Jr., Hamilton, R. E.
Naylor, Illinois, J. Nardi, Illinois, and
F. Bartlett, California University.
A charter was granted to Hamilton
college, Hamilton, N. Y.
'You indigoists
Go To It, 1PDares
71arch Gargoyle
Fantastically draped in an inimita-
ble cover by Lee Boyd, '23, picturing a
limpid blue-eyed damsel in an undis-
cernable costume, the March "Blue-

Law" number of the Gargoyle appear-
ed on the campus yesterday.
With the expressed aim of airing
contrary opinions on the much dis-
cussed blue laws, one of the best bits
of Gargoyle composition was "The
Blue Law Blues" (song and music by
of Gargoylic composition was "The
of the issue proper.
"Those Dark Blue Laws" is one in-
teresting feature which should evoke
considerable entertainment. The gist
of the article is aptly put in the clos-
ing paragraph "Go to it, you indigo-
Ists! To make a thing popular the
simplest way is to prohibit it!"
Clayton Seagears, '23, leads the car-
toonists of the issue in the amount
and quality of work reproduced. His
"model" picture forms an interesting
as well as "chic" frontispiece. W. W.
Gower, '23, has his usual double page
cartoon in the center of the book.
Editorially the Gargoyle argues for
its existence and criticises - non-con-
structively - the Michigan Union

REGENTS ACCEPT
GIFT OF HOME AS
HALL FOR WOMENI
GIANT PROF. TURNER LEAVE OF
ABSENCE; MINNESOTA MAN
COMING
ASK FOR EXCHANGE OF
GEOLOGY PROFESSORS

iCORNELL TRACK MEN ARRIVE THIS
MORNING FOR ANNUAL DUAL MEET;
, ;, VARSITY SQUAD ADDITIONS LIKELY

No Action Taken on Resolution
Editors for Journalism De-
partment

of

JOHN, MOAKLEY'S STAR 440 YARD
and dash man who is expected to
give Capt. Larry Butler a hard tilt
tonight.
OPERA REEARSL
SHIFT TO WHITNEY
Settings Completely Finished for "Top'
o' th' Mornin'"';Show Well
Advanced
ALMOST ALL GOOD SEATS
GONE FOR FIVE-DAY RUN
Rehearsals for "Top o' th' Mornin"'
will be transferred to the Whitney
theater today, three days before the
first performance of the opera next
Tuesday. After more than six weeks
of practice in the workshop without
scenery, the cast and chorus will go
through the entire opera, accompan-
ied by the orchestra, in the atmosphere
of the theater in which the five-day
run will be held. The scenery will be
moved from the workshop where it
was built to the Whitney today.
Scenery All Done
Stage carpenters have been working
overtime to complete the settings for
the two acts. The front curtain,
draperies and main scenery were
completed the first of the week, and
the last few days have been devoted
to the construction and staining of the
last benches, chairs and other neces-
saries to the stage. The windows in
the home on the O'Dare estate were
finished even to the placing of the
heavy plush curtains when the men
called the work done last night.
The ensemble practice yesterday, in
which both acts were produced with
the orchestra, set a record for early
complete rehearsals. The show is a
good deal farther advanced than
"George Did It" a year ago. Rehears-
als are becoming proportionally in-
tensive as the date for performance
draws near, and E. Mortimer Shuter,
director, is driving the men harder
every day.
Good Seats Depleted
A lively ticket sale marked yester-
day's activities at the Whitney thea-
ter where a box office sale was held
for the public for the first time. The
sade will be continued until the seats
are all sold, but it is doubtful if any
very good seats to the four evening
performances and the Saturday aft-
ernon matinee will remain after to-
day.
JAPAN COMMUNIQUE OUTLINES
MANDATORY INTENTION FOR YAP
Tokio, March 25. - Japan's inten-
tion of mandatory for the former
German islands in the Pacific, among
-them the Island of Yap, are outlined
in a 700 word communique issued by
the foreign office today. Japan will
promote the moral and material hap-
piness of the island, and soon will su-
persede the present mal-administra-
tion with a civil government, says the
communique.
The foreign office then character-
izes as fabrication reports that Japan
is shifting administrative headquar-
ters for the Marshall islands from
Jaliut to Woese for strategic purpos-
es, in preventing the landing of for-
eign merchants and is unlawfully in-
terfering with American missionaries
and closing the mission schools.

A gift to the University of the resi-
dence at 516 Madison street was made
known and accepted at the March
meeting of the Board of Regents yes-
terday. The residence is to be used
as a home for women students, and is
to be known as the Adelia Cheever res-
idence hall. The gift was provided for
in the will of Mrs. P. A. Noble, who
died recently.
Prof. Edward R. Turner, of the his-
tory department, was granted a year's
leave of absence, effective during t'
coming academic year. Prof. A. B.
White, of the history department of
the University of Minnesota, will be
added to the faculty during Professor
Turner's absence. Professor White is
one of the leading members of the
Minnesota history department.
Ask for Dutch Professor
A request was made to the minister
of foreign affairs of the Netherlands
for Prof..H. A. Brouwer, head of the
geological department at the Univer-
sity of Delft, Holland, to be sent here
as a lecturer in geology during the
second semester of next year. Profes-
sor Brouwer is one of the two most
eminent geologists of Holland, and
under the plan submitted by the Re-
gents, he is to lecture here while Prof.
W. H. Hobbs lectures at Delft and
Utrecht. Professor Hobbs was re-
cently granted a year's leave of abs-
ence for study and scientific investiga-
tion abroad.
Make Eelection Changes
The Regents authorized a change in1
the method of electing student mem-
bers of the Board in Control of Ath-
letics. In the future the student mem-
ber will be elected by the male mem-
bers of the Athleic association upon
nomination by the board 'of directors
of the association. For each election
the directors are to nominate six can-.
didates, or additional nominations may
be made upon petition signed by 300
student members of the association.
The Regents received with an ex.
pression of appreciation the resolution
of editors of the state asking for the
development of the present courses in
journalism into a department of the
literary college. The request -came as
the result of a conference of leading
editors of the state in Detroit on Feb
25. No further action by the Regents
on the resolution was reported.
Annapolis Plan Approved
Approval was given to an arrange-
ment with the United States govern-
ment for three post-graduate students
from the naval academy at Annapolis
to be detailed here each year by the
navy department for the study of ex-
plosives. The arrangement will be-
come effective next fall.
Mrs. Theodore Buhl and Lawrence
Buhl informed the Regents they have
renewed the classical fellowship for
this year. The Dupont fellowship in
chemical engineering will be contin-
ued for the year 1921-1922.
E. B. Wilkinson, of Bluffton, Ind.
honorary curator of the University
museum of zoology, reported that he
is sending a scientific expedition to
Florida to gather specimens for the
museum.
Miss Isabel Kline, assistant to the
treasurer of the University, was grant-
ed a leave of absence for three months.
Miss Glenadine Calkins received the
degree of M. D. Harlod J. Thorburn
was given the degree of Pharmaceu-
tical Chemist. Seven received the de-
gree LL.B., and 41 were given the de-
gree of B. S., in engineering.
Wilson Recovers from Sudden Illness
Washington, March 25.-Ex-Presi-
dent Wilson was said tonight to be re-
covering satisfactorily from an acute
attack of indigestion which he suffer-
ed shortly after noon today. Admiral

Grayson, the ex-President's physician,
said it probably would be another day
or so before Mr. Wilson could be con-
sidered as entirely recovered.

T. C. McDERMOTT, LEADER OF
the invading Ithacan track team,
which gets in town, 30 strnog, this
morning.
HUGHES REPLIES
TO SOVIET APPEAL

i

Resumption of Trade With Russia
Only Come With Change in
Economic System

Can i

UNIVERSITY CLOCKS GO
FORWARD
University clocks will be set
forward one hour tonight to con-
form with the change in city
time effective Sunday at 2 o'clock
A. M., according to an announce-
ment by Supt. E. C. Pardon, of
the buildings and grounds de-
partment.
"I 1
Entertainers Will
Divert Guests A t
Reception Tonight
Cornell athletes will be shown Mich-
igan hospitality after the track meet
tonight at a reception and lunch at
the Union, details for which were
completed yesterday. Visiting dele-
gates to the National Pi Delta Epsi-
lon convention will also be guests of
honor.
Every effort was made by Mimes of
the Michigan Union to obtain the best
talent on the campus to entertain the
guests as well as the Michigan track
team was received by the Savage club
at Ithaca last year. The reception
will be held at 10:30 o'clock after the
meet in the lobby of the Union, and,
the lunch will be served promptly ate
11 o'clock in the main dining room.
A program of speaking and music
will follow the lunch. Prof. William
D. Henderson, of the extension de-
partment, will act as toastmaster, and'
will call on Prof. Ralph W. Aigler,
chairman of the Athletic board, Cap-
tain Butler, of the Michigan team,
Captain McDermott, of the Cornell'
team, and Romeyn Berry, graduate
manager of the Cornell team, for
talks. Vocal and instrumental solos,
as well as orchestra and string in-
strument music, will constitute the
balance of the program.
Only 10 tickets to the reception re-
main unsold, and it was announced
last night that the first 10 men to ap-
ply after 1 o'clock tomorrow after-
noon in the Union lobby will secure
the tickets.
NOMINATE NEW OFICERS
FOR PHI LAMBDA UPSILON

NOTE IS RESULT OF LONG
DISCUSSION BY CABINET
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 25.-The Amer-
ican government notified the Soviet
authorities in Russia today that re-
sumption of trade between Russia and
the United States could not be consid-
ered until fundamental changes had
been made in the economic system un-
derlying the Soviet regime.'
Hughes. States Points
Safety of human life, guarantee of1
property rights, free labor and ob-
servance, of the sanctity of contracts
were among the requirements laid
down in a brief note by Secretary
Hughes as essential if the doors of
commerce between the two countries
are once more to be opened. The
communication added that "convinc-
ing evidence of the consummation of
such changes" must be furnished be-
fore this government even cares to
discuss the subject.
These requirements, the note de-
clared, lay at the foundation of Russ-
ian productivity by which alone the
nation could hope to rebuild her for-
eign trade and make herself attrac-
tive economically to the nations with
which she desires to exchange pro-
ducts.
Note is Reply
The communication was made public
at the state department in the form of
a statement by Secretary Hughes with
the notation that a note of .it had
been sent to the American consul at
Reval, Esthonia, to be handed to Lit-
vinoss, the Soviet representative there.
The note was in reply to the appeal
recently addressed by the Soviet re-
gime to President Harding and con-
(Continued from Page Six)
FIGHTING FOR CONTROL
OF GERMANY CONTINUES
(By Associated Press)
Berlin, March 25. - Advices re-
ceived tonight from the disturbed in-
dustrial area in Middle Germany state
that the police have recaptured Eisel-
ben and Hettstedt from the commun-
ists after violent fighting.s
The communists have taken pos-
session of large nitrogen works in
Leuna, near Halle, where they are re-
ported to have formed a Red army of
6,000.
Leaders of the communists at Eisel-
ben, the advices added, were over-
thrown and fighting in the Mansseld
district has ceased.
Resumption of work in Eiselben has
been made conditional by the police
commander upon the restoration of
order, the return of property and the
handing over to the authorities of all
ammunition. He promised that those
who volntarily surrendered would not
be punished

INTRAMURAL DEPARTMENT WILL
PUT ON THREE RELAY
RACES
ITHACANS WINNERS OF
LAST TWO CONTESTS
Wolverines Given Better Than Even
Chance to Win on Past
Records
Twenty-six contestants, Graduate
Manager Berry, Manager Bailey, Coach
Moakley, and Trainer Vreedenburg
compose the squad of 30 men that will
arrive at 8:40 o'clock this morning
from Ithaca to compete in the an-
nual Cornell-Michigan track meet.
There will probably be some addi-
tions to the Michigan squad in this
meet, the most likely being Burke in
the dash and Swift in the hurdles. Oth-
ers will be entered in the mile and
half mile. Aside from these events
the same team that competed for
Michigan in the Conference indoor
meet will be pitted against Cornell.
Intramural Finals
As an added attraction three relay
races have been arranged by the In-
tramural athletic department. Two are
finals in the interfraternity track
meet, both the medley and four-lap
relay to be run between the teams
representing Phi Gamma Delta and
Delta Tau Delta. The freshman and
sophomore classes will run an eight-
lap relay race.
Michigan has two consecutive de-
feats in indoor meets at the hands of
Cornell to repay tonight. In 1918
Michigan met the Ithacans in Water-
man gymnasium and lost 50 to 20. Last
year Moakley's squad also won, though
by the smallest of margins - that of
one race, the mile relay. Michigan has
more than an equal chance to win
tonight unless the Wolverines fall
down on their previous performances.
The race between Captain Butler and
John in the 440, the eight-lap relay
and the pole vault should be events
of merit, if one can judge from the
caliber of the contestants.
Entry List
The list of competitors, complete at
the time of writing, is as follows:
Dash, Michigan-Losch, Kelly, Sim-
mons, Burke; Cornell - Carpenter,
Davison, John, Righter, and H. H.
Smith. Quarter mile, Michigan -
Butler, Wheeler, Forbes, Wetzel, Lew-
is; Cornell-Chapman, John, H. H.
Smith. Half mile, Michigan-Burk-
holder, Burns, Merz; Cornell-Cook,
Irish, Richman. Running high jump,
Michigan-Forbes, Platts; Cornell-
Garder, Lathrop, Vermilye, Watt.
High and low hurdles, Michigan-
Sargent, Cruikshank, Swift; Cornell-
Archbold, A. H. and A. B. Treman,
Vermilye, Watt. Mile run, Michigan-
Standish, Freeborne, Douglas; Cor-
nell - Gillies, Harper, McDermott,
Strickler. Pole vault, Michigan-Wes-
brook, Naylor; Cornell-Gouinlock,
Stevens. Shot put, Michigan-Van
Orden, Stipe; Cornell-Davison, Good,
now. Relay, Michigan-Butler, Forbes,
(Continued on Page Six)
WORCESTER POLYTECHNIC HEAD
PANS A. F. OF L. IN DEMANDS

DELEGATES ADOPT POLICY
PROGRESSIVE EXPANSION
FOR SOCIETY

OFI

The biennial convention of Phi
Lambda Upsilon, honorary chemical
society, which has been in session here
for the last two days, came to a close
last night.
The new national officers nominated
yesterday were:, H. M. Elsey, presi-
dent, and C. Z. Draves, University of
Washington, secretary and treasurer.
The editor of the society's publica-
tions will be nominated at a later date
and will be a man from the Michigan
chapter.- Elections will not be made
until next fall and in the meantime

t
i
i
s

a coalition of any three or more New York, March 25.-The American
chapters is empowered to make new Federation of Labor was criticized to-
nominations. night Dr. Ira N. Hollis, president of
The delegates adopted a policy of the Worcester Polytechnic institute,
progressive expansion and look for- for what he termed "undue exercise
ward to establishment of new chapters of powers by a minority" in exerting
in approved universities. A new set legislative and administrative press-
of by-laws were formulated for a bet- ure in this country. Addressing an
ter interpretation of the constitution, assemblage of mechanic and electrical
Eight alumni were enlisted to aid the engineers, Dr. Hollis said:
organization in financial matters. "When the American Federation of
The delegates extended thanks to Labor demands of congress certain leg-
the members of the local chapter for islation or represents to the President
their efficient service as hosts. of the United States that he must have
one of their number in his cabinet it
Naval Balloon Still Missing is an undue exercise of power by a
Pensacola, Fla., March 25. - Con- minority, just as serious to the future
tinued search today by squadrons of of our republic as the present activi-
aeroplanes, flying boats, dirigibles and ties of the hyphenates. Unchecked
eagle boats failed to discover any powers of minorities is dangerous
trace of they missing naval balloon, in to any form of government."
command of Chief Quartermaster P. K. Railroad workers were condemned
Wilkinson, carrying four students by the speaker for controlling this
which left the air station here : to- country through its transportation
night and which last reported over system by means of the same kind of
the gulf 20 miles off St. Andrew's bay. force.
v

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