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March 22, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-22

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THE WEATHER
FAI.; much COLDER.
TODAY

V 5k mrt lan

:4 .ati

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
I A Y AND 'N U~aIITIt" i

VOL. XXXI No. 118. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 1921. PRICE FIVE CEN

i s

FORONEY T ARIFF
FIR ST BUSINESS
OF NEW CONGRESS
HOUSE AND SENATE WILL TRY
TO ItSil BILL THROUGH
AT ONCE
TO PASS MEASURE AT
PRhSIDENT'S REQUEST

al
i
i
i
i

HANFORD LECTURES
ON MILTON TODAY
Prfso' Address the 'Result; of
Mainy Years' Olrigial Study
Prof. James 1l. Hanford, of the Uni-
versity of North Carolina, a noted au-
thority on the Miltonic period in Eng-
lish literature, will lecture at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon in the auditor-
ium of the Natural Scienccrbuilding on
"John Milton's Private Studies."
.While in Ann Arbor Professor Han-
ford will be entertained at the home
of Prof. Morris P. Tilley, of the Eng-
lish department. He will be the guest
of the entire English faculty this noon
at a luncheon given in his honor at
the Michigan Union.
Professor Hanford has been for sev-
eral years engaged in making an or-
iginal study of Milton's "Common-
place" book, a diary of Milton's life,
and the results of his investigation
will form the substance of his lecture
this afternoon.

PARKS HANDS IN HISRE SIGNATION;
'' VAN BOVEN ELECTED NEW CAPTIN

Proposed Legislation Will be
Temporary Nature; To Have
New Bill Later

of

(,y Associated Press)
Washington, March 21.-The Ford-
ney emergency tariff bill, precisely asI
vetoed by ex-President Wilson, will be
rushed through congress as the first
important legislation of the extra ses-
sion.'
President Requests Bill
Acceeding to the request of Pres-
ident Harding for passage of a meas-
ure designed to help farmers, asking
for protection against foreign compet-
ition, Republican . members of the
house ways and means committee today
voted to revive the Fordney bill after
agreeing almost unanimously a week
ago not to consider any emergency
legislation ahead of a permanent tar-
iff and, revenue revision.
Senators Penrose, Smoot, and Mc-
Cumber, conferees from the senate fi-
nance committee agreed to the new
program, which, it was explained,
meets with the approval of the Presi-
dent. Senator Penrose expressed the
belief that the emergency measure
would be in the ha'nds of Presidentr
Harding within 10 days after the con-
vening of the special session, April 11.
Hold Conferencet
Several members of the house com-
mittee, including Chairman Fordney
and Representatives Logworth and
Green, conferred with Senator Pen-
rose who heads the senate finance
committ'ee, after the former committee
had reached its agreement. From this
conference came the prediction that
the measure would be rushed through
the house under a special rule and
through the senate, possibly under
limitations of debate as enforced by
cloture.
The new Fordney bill will be pre-
sented with a six months' limitation,
but its provisions will expire at an
earlier date should the permanent bill
be enacted before expiration of the
six months' period.
Artists Conclude
Jatinee JMusical
Series Ton igh t
Olga Samaroff, pianist, and the De-
troit Symphony String quartet will be
the artists at the last concert in the
Matinee Musicale series at 8 o'clock
this evening in Pattengill auditorium.
The quartet is composed of Ilya
Schkolnik and William Grafing King,
violins, Herman Kolodkin, viola, and
Philip Abbas, 'cello. The work of this
organization is considered to rank
with the best of th'I type of musical
'artistry. Ossip Gabrilowitsch, con-
ductor of the Detroit Symphony or-
chestra, says: "The Detroit Sym-
phony String quartet stands on a par
with the finest chamber music organ-
ization now before the public."
Madame Samaroff is a pianist of the
highest caliber. From the outset her
career has been one of remarkable
distinction, both in Europe and Amer-
ica, and the pronounced success with
which she met her tour last year
marked a new .era of artistic develop-
m-nt.
The' quartet will play the Haydn
Quartet No. 10, and with Madame
Samarff the Caesar Frank Quintet in
F minor. Madame Samaroff and Mr.
Abbas will play the Saint-Saens So-
nata for the piano and 'cello, opus 32.
BITRTON WILL PROBABLY MEET
1WITh ]EGENTS ON FRIDAY
The condition of President Marion
L. Burton continues to show a steady
improvement, He is now able to sit

up, and it is thought that he will be'
sufficiently recovered by Friday to
confer with the Regents at their meet-
ing without overtaxing his strength.

11

2 IRISH SONGS
OPERA FEATURE

Mail Order Total Largest in History;'
Many Good Seats Still
Left
BOX OFFICE TICKET SALE
OPENS TODAY FOR CAMPUS
Musical hits of "Top o' th' Mornin'"
are sure to be Irish, for each of the
12 numbers of this year's opera is es-
sentially a part of the plot which is
laid in County Limerick, Ireland. The
songs will be in striking contrast to
those of purely local color in "George
Did It" last year. George H. Roder-
ick, '21E, composed the tunes for
every number except "Paris Green
Blues," which is the work of Edwin
Meiss, '23, and Myron T. Chon, '23.
Lyrics were written by Russell
Barnes, '20, Buckley C. Robbins, '23,
and Byron Darnton, '23.
Hard to Pick Best Numbers
Only the reactions of audiences will
tell which of the songs will be most
liked, but it is certain that "Peggy
O'Dare" and "Honey," both sung by
Kemp Keena, '20, will bid strong for
popularity. "Hot Dog," by Hilliard
E. Rosenthal, '21, and "Fairy Foun-
ain," by Earl C. Kneale, '22, are said
to be extremely catchy. Howard E.
Ramsy, '21E, will lead in "The Dub-
lin Walk," while Thomas E. Dewey,
'23, sings' "Satan Put a Devil in the
Irish." -
"Paris Green Blues," by Hilliard E.
Rosenthal, '21, leading comedian, will
cause many a laugh. "When You
Love," by Kemp Keena, '20, and' E.
Marlowe Stevens, '21E, leading man
and woman, respectively, is a number
that will be particularly appealing be-
.cause of the music as well as the
lines
Other songs are "In My Arithmetic,"
by William Turner, '21, and Philip E.
Ringer, '22; "Miss Brodie's Boarding
School for Girls," by Buckley C. Rob-
bins, '23, and George Schemm, '22; "A
Paradise for Micks," by Howard E.
Ramsey, '21E, Thomas E. Dewey, '23,
W. Lloyd Berridge, '21, and Herbert
P. Wagner, '21; and "Touch o' th'
Green," by Kemp Keena, '20. "Swing
Along" is the title of the opening
chorus.
Mail orders for opera tickets were
filled yesterday and today the box of-
fice sale begins for Union members
who did not send in orders. Two
days, today and tomorow, will be
given the men to make their pur-
chases, the hours of sale being from
10 to 12 o'clock in the morning, and
from 2 to 5 o'clock in the afternoon in
the Union lobby. All unsold tickets
will be placed on box office sale for
University women from 2 to 5 o'clock
Thursday afternoon in Hill auditor-
ium,
General Public Sale Starts Friday
Although more than 1,200 applica-
tions were received by mail, the larg-
est advance sale in the history of the
opera, there are still many seats to
be sold, especially to the Tuesday
evening and Saturday afternoon per
formances, for which exceptionally
good seats can be obtained.
The box office sale for the general
.public begins at the Whitney theater
Friday, March 25.

"Slicker" Admits Playing on Portland
Team During the Past
Summer
BARTELILE DESIRES THAT
FURTHER COMMENT CEASE
"I have had a conference with
'Slicker' Parks and he has offered his
resignation from the baseball team,"
said Philip G. Bartelme, director of
outdoor athletics, yesterday. "Parks
admitted that he had played with the
Portland baseball club during the past
summer under the name of Harold
Brooks."
Thought Precedes Action
Mr. Bartelme stated that the base-
ball captain had given considerable
thought to the situation before com-
ing to see him, with the result that
the resignation was offered immedi-
ately. "I can see no reason or pur-
pose in further speculation and guess-
ing as to the why and wherefore of
the whole affair," concluded Mr. Bar-
telme.
In commenting upon the disclosure'
of the Chicago Tribune that Parks had
played professional baseball last sum-
mer, Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, chairman
of the Board in Control of Athletics,
said: "Since Parks has admitted that
he played, I can see nothing further
to do about the situation. Under Con-
ference rules 'Slicker' is ineligible and
the only thing that remained for him
to do was to resign."
Aigler Almost Saw "Brooks"
Professor Aigler said that he was
surprised when he first heard th re-
port, yet he thought that such a rum-
or had existed on the campus for some
time. "I can't help but wonder," con-
cluded the professor, "who would have
been the more surprised had I gone
to a baseball game when I was in
Portland this summer and seen 'Har-
old Brooks' warming up for the game.
I came pretty near attending, at
that."
REGENT IS PRINCIPAL
IN UNKRUPTCY CSE
Dr. W. H. Sawyer, of Hillsdale, Re-
gent of the University, is a principal
in a bankruptcy case, involving $175,-
000, which was started recently in the
Hillsdale circuit court. The final ar-
gument for the case was made at 5
,o'clock Saturday afternoon, in the Ann
Arbor circuit court.
Claims Based on Receipts
A. F. Freeman, of Ann Arbor,
represented Attorney W. Lockerby
who, as trustee in, bankruptcy for
Dr. Sawyer, is trying to secure$175,-
000 for the doctor's creditors. Mr.
Freeman's claims were based on the
$10,955 which the doctor is said to
have received as executor of the Wil-
liam W. Mitchell estate. Another claim
is on the $111,000 Dr. Sawyer is said
to have left from the estate, which or-
iginally amounted to $200,000. He
married the sister of Mr. Mitchell.
Dr. Sawyer's attorneys claim that
the legacy left him by the Mitchells'
has disappeared in the failure of the
Alamo Manufacturing company, in
which the doctor had invested heavily.
Sample Hears Case
Judge G. W. Sample, of the Ann Ar-
bor circuit court, heard the case, due
to the reluctance of the Hillsdale
judge, who was unwilling to try the
case because of his friendship for the
principals.
It is not known when the decision
will be given, according to Attorney
A. F. Freeman, of Ann Arbor.

BROKERAGE OFFICE OPENED
IN NATIONAL BANK BUILDING
Marking the first establishment of
its kind in Ann Arbor, E. G. Hildner,
'17, has opened a brokerage office in
the National Bank building in part-
nership with J. S. Langley. Market
quotations will be quoted from the
prominent exchanges. In connection
x with this, a special wire to the New
York Stock Exchange will be main-
tained. Chicago, Detroit, and Boston
exchanges will also be quoted.
r Both Langley and Hildner have had
previous experience in brokerage es-
1 tablishments, Hildner having repre-
sented a brokerage off ie in Ann Ar-
bor after his graduation.

Record of Recently Chosen Head
Varsity Nine Shows Steady
Playing

of

WILL PROBABLY PLAY SHORT,
FILLING BERTH RNODE LEFT
Peter J. Van Boven, '21, of Grand
Rapids, was elected captain of the
1921 Varsity baseball team Monday
afternoon at a meeting of the veter-
ans of the championship 1920 nine.
This Season His Third
This season will complete Van Bov-
en's third ,as a member of a Michigan
baseball team. During the two last,
Michigan has been Conference cham-
pion.
"Pete" started his diamond career
at Michigan on the 1920 freshman
team, on which nine he was short-
stop. The year after he was in the
service, but on his return in 1919, he
became utility infielder, filling in for
Knode and Garrett, who was then
playing as second baseman.
Last year Van Boven was one of the
steadiest performers on the team,
holding down second base in sensa-
tional fashion, and hitting at oppor-
tune times. His mark for the year was
around .290, with a Conference record
of .283.
Future Seems Brilliant
From his fielding this year, the new
leader should be one of the best field-
ers ever in a Maize and Blue uniform.
He will probably play the position
left vacant by the graduation of
Knode, shortstop, and by all indica-
tions will be as brilliant as his prede-
cessor.
"OH, OH, CNDY" OPENS TNCT f HT I 1
TONIGH AWHTE

CHEMICAL HONOR
SOCIETYTO MEET
Under the auspices of the Iocal
chapter with headquarters at the
Michigan Union, the biennial conven-
tion of Phi Lambda Upsilon, honorary -
chemical society, will be held in Ann -
Arbor on Thursday and Friday of this
week.
This convention will be an innova-
tion inasmuch as its predecessors have
been held in conjunction with meet-
ings of the American Chemical socie-
ty. It is felt that this separation will
offer better opportunity for discussion
and constructive planning than has
previously been possible. Further-
more, it is believed that the active
chapters will be more accurately rep-
resented and their co-operation more
certain in applying any principles
which may be conceived.
MEETHERE RIDAY
Honorary Fraternity Assembles For
First Time Outside New York
City
PI DELTA EPSILON TO HOLD
15TH ANNUAL CONVENTION
Pi Delta Epsilon, honorary journal-
istic fraternity, will hold its 15th an-
nual national convention in Ann Arbor
next Friday and Saturday.
This will be the first convention of
the fraternity ever held outside of
New York City, and it is largely due to
the efforts of C. Stewart Baxter, '21,
that Michigan is to be honored by
this event. Baxter attended the meet-
ing of the grand council in New York
City last January when it was decil-
ed to hold the convention in Ann Ar-
bor.
14 Uhapters to be Represented
Of the 17 chapters of the fraternity,'
'14 have definitely signified their in-
tentions to send delegates. Those col-
leges whose chapters will be repre-
sented are: Columbia university,
University of Syracuse, Dartmouth
college, Colgate college, University of
Toronto, Ohio Wesleyan university,
University of California, Coe college,
and the University of Michigan.
All of the convention meetings will
be held at the Union. Friday afternoon
will see the convention opened with
an initiation and a banquet at which
Malcolm Bingay, editor of the Detroit
News, will speak. That evening the
preliminary business meeting will be
held. Saturday morning the final bus-
iness meeting will take place, during
which time Prof. Morris P. Thiley
will give an address to the delegates.
Saturday afternoon will be occupied
by a 'general tour of Ann Arbor. In
the evening the deltgates are to at-
tend the Cornell track meet in Water-
man gymnasium, afterwards koing with
the members of the Cornell track team
to the Union where an entertainment
will be given by the Mimes.
Alumni Plan Visit
Alumni who will attend the conven-
tion are: Philip C. Pack, '19, advertis-
ing manager of the Autocall company
of Shelby, 0., and Mark K. Ehlbert
'20, national president of Pi Delta Ep
silon.

CARLIFORNIA ANTI
JAPANESE A CTS
NEEDBESTRIN]
-STREET.
SPEAKER DOES NOT FAVOR BAl
TO IMMIGRATION BEING
LIFTED
ORIENTALS DIFFERENT
NOT INFERIOR, CLAIl
Objections to Far East Influx Bas
: on Labor Competition, Race
Pecularities
"Unless the national government r
tains California in its anti-Japane:
activities, relations between Japan a
and the United States will get wor:
and worse, and tlwe fault will be mos
ly ours," said Julian Street, writ
and lecturer who spoke yesterday ev
ning at the Union, under the auspic
of the Collegiate Alumnae associati
and the Homoeopathic Hospital Fuil
Street emphasized that any approat
to the Japanese question from ti
view point that the Orientals are a
inferior race is a great error, that tl
Japanese are not inferior but diffe
ent, and that only in working on th
premise could a successful soluti
to the problem be worked out.
"Melting Pot Overworked"
The speaker does not favor lifting
the bars against Japanese immigr
tion, nor does he think that the poll
of admission to Europeans should 1
continued. "The melting pot has be
overworked, and we must give it
rest," he said.
Street bases .his objections to ti
admission of Japanese upon two ci
cumstances, the labor competitic
which large numbers of the Orient
workers wouldbring to Aieriee
workers, and the fact that the t
races are essentially different. I
considers assimilation of the Japane
impossible, and thinks that there a
already enough un-Americanized el
ments in the country.-
Government Asks Protection
The Japanese government is not d
sirous of sending any more imn
grants to this country but is only as
ing that those already h-ere be giv
proper protection and be allowed
live unmolested by American leg
lators, according to the lecturer.
Regarding the allegations that Jap;
is the "Germany of the East," t
speaker pointed out that the Japane
people are not favorable to the und
preachings of the militarist class, a:
that the heavy taxes for the upkeep
the army and navy are very heal
He showed that the adoption of mil:
(Continued on Page Eight)
f EITAL
Will Give Series of Ten Lectures
University Public
Lieutenant-Commander William
Faust, '01L, gave the first of a ser:
of 10 lectures yesterday afternoon.
"Admiralty Law." The lecture cc
- sisted of a survey of the early tim
of admiralty law down to, th pres

UNIVERSITY
PART IN

STUDENTS TAKEI
LOCAL LEGION
PLAY

Final rehearsals have been complet-
ed for the two-act musical comedy,
"Oh, Oh, Cindy," to be presented by
the Irwin Prieskgrn post of the Amer-
ican Legion at the Whitney theater
tonight and Wednesday. A part of the
comedy is staged in the Cannibal is-
lands, with Robinson Crusoe, hise man
Friday, and the the inhabitants of the
island shown in many amusing situa-
tions.
The production is in charge of John
B. Rogers of Fostoria, 0., who direct-
ed "Fifi of the Toy Shop" in Ann Ar-
bor last year.
Seat sales have been heavy, accord-
ing to the directors, and they expect
all available tickets for both nights
will be taken today.
A number of University students are
to take parts in the play, the lead be-
ing taken by William McGowan, '21E.
The other members of the cast are
taken from the membership of the
post and Ann Arbor townspeople.
TICKETS FOR SENIOR LAW
DINNER ON SALE TOMORROW
Tickets for the dinner given in hon-
or of the Law school faculty at 6:15
o'clock April 5 by members of the sen-
ior law class will be on sale tomor-
row in the first floor corridor of the,
Law building. This dinner is by na-
ture a revival of an old custom which
has been in abeyance since 1914.
Dean Henry M. Bates, of the Law
school, will deliver the principal ad-
dress at the banquet, his subject be-
ing: "The Lawyer of the Future."
Prof. Burke Shartel, Douglas Clap-
perton, '21L, and Valois E. Crossley,
will also speak. George Bouchard,
president of the '21L class, will act as
toastmaster.
FRESH ENGINEERS WILL HOLD
THEATER PARTY AT THE MAJ

i
t
r
,,
3
i
i
T

1
1
E
E
1
3
1

date.
COMEDY CLUB ANNOUNCES ITS Commander Faust will give the SE
ANNUAL DANCE FOR SATURDAY ond lecture at 4 o'clock today in roi
G of the Law building. All membi
University Professors and Wives WIJI of the University are extended an
Act as Chaperones at vitation to any or all of the series
Party , lectures.
Due to a misunderstanding, it w
.eonreportedin Saturday's Daily that Co
mander Faust was commandant of t
nual dance at 8 o'clock Saturday Navy Yard at Charleston, S. C., duri
evening, March 26 in Barbour gymna- the war. This should have stated tl
sium, according to Albert C. Jacobs, his connection with the Navy Yc
'21, president. . was incident to the fact that he m
Jacobs stated that the dance will chief of staff ;of the Sixth Naval d
be limited to members of the Comedy trict, in which the Charleston NE
club only and that all the members Yard is located. It was in that
are expected to be present. Rhodes' pacity that Commander Faust bec
orchestra will furnish music. Prof. J. liason officer between the comma
Raleigh Nelson., director of Comedy isnofcrbtenheoma
ant of the district and the comma
club, and Mrs. Nelson, and Prof. Lou- anisftteiNv t ad. thsconnect
is Strauss, of the English depart- ant of the Navy Ya rdl. His connect
e r was the same at the rifle range.
inct, and Mrs. Strauss will act as
chaperones.

Freshmen engineers decided last
t night at a committee meeting to hold1
e a theater party at the Maj Friday
a evening, March 25. The entertainment
y will begin at 8:30 o'clock, and will be
the regular last show.
n Tickets will be on sale Wednesday
at the class assembly as well as at,
d the box office of the theater Friday
- night. This is the second social func-
- tion given by the '24 class and the
" committee is anxious that as large a
number as possible attend. M

3'

'21E Buy Caps and Gowns at Kyer's
Senior engineers are urged by the
committee to be fitted for caps and;
gowns immediately at George W. Ky-
er's, corner of North University and
South Thayer.

MICHIGANENSIAN NOTICE
Fraternity and organizatio
bills are three months past di
and must be paid at once.

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