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October 16, 1920 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-- - - . - .- - - - - - -

AlLY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Number 11

lsiting Delegates:
The meeting of representative Regents of State Universities to be
eld at 9:30 a. m. today at the Michigan Union will be open to Presidents
State Universities and any members of Governing Boards of Colleges
ad Universities who may be in the city. It will not be an executive ses-
on. JUNIUS E. BEAL. Regent.
aps and Gowns:
All Caps and Gowns furnished by the University for Members of the
aculty and the Honor Guard should be returned to the Secretary's Office,
niversity Hall, not later than noon today.
SHIRLEY W. SMITH.
otice to Freshmen of the College of Literature, Selenee, and the Arts:
The first of the "Talks to Freshmen" by President Burton will be given
[onday, Oct. 18, at 4 p. m. Attendance at this meeting will have priority
ver all other University engagements.J. E
J. S. REEVES.
otice to Freshmen of College of Literature, Science, and the Arts:
Nomination and election of class officers will take place immediately
fter President Burton's "Talk to Freshmen" on Monday, Oct. 18, 4 p. m.
'his election will be conducted by the Student Council. All Freshmen in
his College are urged to be present.
THE STUDENT COUNCIL.
taff of the Departmuent of Romance Languages:
The enrollments in certain sections of French having gone beyond the
eating capacity of the rooms to which they were assigned, it is important"
hat accurate figures for the enrollment in French 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13a, 13b
nd 13c be in my hands by Monday noon next. These figures should give
he total number apparently enrolled in each section, the number actually
egularly present, and the number whose enrollment is incomplete by rea-
on of the absence of enrollment or questionnaire cards. Full lists of
ames for each section are also desired at as early a date as possible.
A. G. CANFIELD.
entistry Students:
Mr. Maurice Gantz and Mr. J. M. Oswald are requested to report at the
ean's office at their earliest opportunity.
All students who did not leave their Ann Arbor addresses at the time
f registration are requested to do so at once.
MARCUS L. WARD,.
raduate School-Faculty Bibliography:
Members of the Faculties should report their publications for the
eriod, July 1, 1919, to June 20, 1920, within a week if possible. The re-
orts should be typewritten and strictly according to the form that has
,ready been sent out. Copies of the Bibliography for the period, 1909-1918,
Lay be had in a limited number on application at the office of the Graduate{
chool. ALFRED H. LLOYD.
ervice Men:
All students who were in Military, Naval, or other Federal service dur-
ag the European War and who have not sent in a detailed and complete
ecount of their service, are asked to call at once at the Alumni Cataloguej
Ifice, basement of the Alumni Memorial hall, and fill out a blank. This
pplies to all University students, including those who saw service before
arolling in the University for the first time.
Circularizing of all former students has been completed. By means of
his notice only will students now in attendance at the University be cir-
alarized. H. L. SENSEMANN,
Secretary of the Military Record Committee.

SPEAKERS ANSWER FOUR GREAT
PROBLEMS OF UNIVERSITIES
(Continued from Page One)
worth while. The colleges today will
fail if tbey do not train a few guides
and interpreters of the things of high-
er life."
Urges Conferences
Co-operation between the university
and the college, according to the
speaker, is to be secured. by a sense
of fellowship in a common task and a
realization that the two institutions
are not competitors for business. Oc-
casional conferences between the
president of the state university and
the executives of the smaller schools
would be of material benefit, as would
also intercollegiate relations in ath-
letics, debates, and other student ac-
tivities, Dr. Cowling said.
He urged the faculties of the uni-
versity and the college to come into
closer relationship, to the end that
students be encouraged to take their
undergraduate work in - the college
preparatory to the professional stud-
les in the university.
Co-operation with the vital activi-
ties of life was considered by Hon.
Frederick R. Fish, trustee of the
Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology.
President Burton presided at the
session and introduced the speakers.
An organ recital was given by Prof.
Earl V. Moore before the session.
EDUCATORS CLOSE MEETING
DISCUSSION OF VITAL TOPICS
(Continued from Page One)
in research threatens not merely im-
mediate achievement in it, but also
the provision of the workers neces-
sary for future achievement. And any
lessening in American re'search now,
or lessening of the provisions for re-
search in the future threatens the
American national strength and well-
being."
Large Schools do Most
Professor Kellogg referred to the
menace to research arising from the
great stimulus given science by the,
war which has resulted in the present
draining of scientific men from the
universities for work in industrial
laboratories.
Professor Kellogg admitted that a
major part of the university research
in this country comes from a com-
paratively small number of larger,
richer, better equipped, more brilli-
antly staffed institutions. He went on
to say, however, that the large. major-
ity of the men doing this research
work were supplied by the smaller
institutions.

WHAT'S GOING ON
SATURDAY
2:45-Varsity band meets in front of
University hall. Full uniform.
7:00-Upper Room Bible class meets
in Upper Room, Lane hall.
8:00-Unitarian guild party for new
and old students in church parlors.
SUNDAY
9:30 A. M.-University Men's Bible
class meets in Lane hall.
3:00-Sealp and . Blade meets in
room 302 of Union. Members urg-
ently requested to be present.
3:00-The Rev. Dr. J. Caplan of Cin-
cinnati, addresses initial meeting of
the Intercollegiate Zionist society
in Lane hall.
4:30 - Student Volunteers meet in
Upper Room of Lane hall.
5:45-Light supper and social half
hour at the Unitarian guild forum.,
6:00-Social half hour at Methodist
church.
6:20-Wesleyan guild meets at Meth-

MAJOR . K. CARSON OPENS
LOCAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL
The Michigan Military and Naval
Preparatory institute technical school
has recently entered its temporary
home at 1200 Packard street. Accord-
ing to ;Major Roy K. Carson, the in-
structor, the purpose of the school is
to encourage men, who have not time
for a broader education, in construc-
tive research ,along technical lines.
At present there are 5 day and
35 night students enrolled in the
school. The major hopes within the
next two years to have a military
academy with the technical school as
a department situated .in the new
building which is in the process of
construction at the southeast corner
of Dewey and Packard streets.
Major Roy K. Carson is a former
midshipman of Annapolis. For the
past 14 years he has been coaching
prospective entrants for Annapolis
and West Point. During the war he
designed a crankless engine for air-
planes; just at the close of the war
he designed a sea sled destroyer
which was sanctioned by Navy de-
U~~t ~iuci.±Y1~ .AL~~3 IUU r patmntofical. ad s.ai.t. b

Engineering Note

oais enrcn.Mis Lousa ouns,! partment officials and is said to be
leads, the fastest torpedo destroyer in exist-
6:30-Mr. T. S. Evans speaks at the ence.
Unitarian guild forum on "The Dif-
ference in the Expression of Relig- MICHIGAN ALUMNUS NOMINATED
ion at Princeton and Pennsylvanial
Universities." FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR
6:30-Presbyterian church Christian
Endeavor society holds regular Capt. Frank A. Picard, '12L, has
meeting in- church parlors.: A social been selected as the democratic nom-
half hour beginning at 6 o'clock pre- inee for the office of lieutenant-gov-
cedes the program. ernor of Michigan. He is but 0 years
of age. While attending the Univer-
SEVENTY ST. CLAIR ALUMNI ! sity, Picard made one of the finest

Recently an oil burning engine of
the semi-Deisel vertical type was re-
ceived by the mechanical engineering
department from the Fairbanks Morse
Co. The body of the engine has been
placed in the M. E. laboratory for the
present; the wheels in the auto lab-
oratory.
To date the work on oil engines has
been confined to two obsolete types,
one which burns kerosene only, and
the other a few grades of oil. The
new machine will take practically
anything from kerosene down to the
heavier grades. It is capable of de-
veloping 37 1-2 horsepower and has
a shipping weight of 15,000 pounds.
All of the latest equipment is in-
cluded, consisting of an air compress-
er for starting and a Prony brake
for testing and adjusting loads. Most
of the demonstrating machines are
second hand. It has not yet been de-
cided where to set the new engine up
permanently.
MONTH MEMBERSHIP DRIVE
IS PLANNED BY VETERANS
Plans for a month's membership
drive have been laid by the Veterans
of Foreign Wars, according to War-
ren Gilbert, '22E, commander of the
Richard N. Hall post. On Nov. 11 the
campaign for membership will close
with a dinner given in the Union in
commemoration of Armistice day.
More than 25 new members were
admitted into the University post
last Wednesday night at the initial
meeting of the school year. The next
meeting of the V. F. W. will take
place next Wednesday night in room
318 of the Union. It is requested by
the commander that all ex-service
men eligible for the organization be
at the nieeting, bringing with them
their discharge papers.
China Accepts 7ap Plan
Tokio,, Oct. 15.-- The newspapers
announce that China has accepted Ja-
pan's proposal for joint. military ope-
rations in Southern Manchuria, but
China requested withdrawal of the
Japanese forces as soon as order was
established.
Dance tonight, Packard Academy.-
Adv.

TO ATTEND ILLINOIS' GAME
Seventy St. Clair county alumni of
the University will attend the Ill-
inois game here Oct. 23, making the
trip from Port Huron, Marysville, St.
Clair, and neighboring points in the
county, aboard a special D. U. R. car
chartered for the occasion.
The St. Clair county organization
is said to be one of the livest alumni
bodies in the state, holding meetings
from time to time with such speakers
as President Marion L. Burton and
Coach Fielding H.-Yost, E. J. Ottaway,
'94, and former managing editor of
The Daily, is president of the asso-
ciation.i

records of any man of recent years.'
Besides earning his way through
school he made the varsity football'
team, was an active worker in the
Michigan Union and the Student
council.
Following his graduation, Picard1
took up' the practice of law in Sagi-
naw, and was soon made prosecuting
attorney of that city. In 1917 he en-
listed in the world war, made an ex-'
cellent record both here and in'
France, and was made captain and
recommended for majority.
Ube the advertising columns of The
Michigan Daily to reach the best of
Ann Arbor's buyers.-Adv.

University Men and Women==
You are assured a cordial welcome, excellent
service and your money's worth alw ays at
Wahr's University Bookstores
316 State St. Main St. opp. Court House

We write insurance of all kinds:j
Fire, tornado, automobile, tourist,
floater bonds. POTTER & ALLS-
HOUSE, 601-4 First National Bank
Bldg. Phone 2072.-Adv.

We Save Your Clothes By Taking Pains

WINDOW SHADES

PICTURE FRAMING

We Wash
In
Soft Water
CAL L
ONE DAY SERVICE

Sew on Buttons,I
and do Reason-
able Mending
165
ON REQUEST

Student Headquarters
We carry complete stocks of "Brighten-Up" finishes in small size
cans for all "touch-up" jobs around the house.

PAINTS
ENAMELS

VARNISHES ]
KALCIMINES

BRUSH S
STAINS

WALL PAPER
GLASS

White Swan Laundry Company
DETROIT and CATHERINE STS.
Whit Swa Laudr Com an

L. E. WE N ZEL
Painting and Decorating
PHONE 84 207 EAST LIBERTY ST.
Welcome Back To
Blighty
Born during the war, Blighty took for its name a war term
meaning home. It proved to be the Home of Sweets to the
Michigan S. A. T. C.
Since then Michigan students have found in it a place where
quality, service and a home-like atmosphere is assured.

Warm And Comfortable
Attractive In Both
Price and Quality.
Tailored To Fit You
From The Cloth You L
At A Price That Will
Please Your Pocketbook.
Come In Today
Order Your Fall O'Coat.
We Guarantee
You'll Be Well Pleased.

ike

709 N. University.

Gordon Leather and Sheep-Lined Coats
J. K. Malcoln

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