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March 18, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-18

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THE, WEATHER
PROBABLY FAIR
TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRES
DbAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL XXX. No. 115. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTS

THREE ILT NS
IIIELMADEBY.GERMNS
DISARMAMENT, REPARATION AND
TRIAL OF ACCUSED OFFICERS
NOT FULFILLEDJ
ALLIED ACTS GET VOTE
APPROVAL BY FRANCE1
Chambers of Deputies Gives Almost
Ufnanmous Ballot for Work
of Reparation Council
(By Associated Press)
Paris, March 17.-- The decision of
the Loandon reparation conference, the
occupation of Dueseldorf and other
German cities and the application of
the Allied economic penalties on Ger-
many were approved by the chamber
of deputies this afternoon by a vote
that was virtually unanimous except
for the socialists and communists.
Briand Makes Reply
Premier Briand, replying to ques-
tions as to the government's intention
with regards to the execution of the
treaty of Versailles and securing the
disarmament of Germany, took occa-
sion to answer Germany's protest to
the League of Nations against the Al-
lied occupation on the grounds that it
was a violation of the treaty. He
called the attention of the chamber to
the fact that at the same time this
protest was sent Germany had refus-
ed, at the summons of the reparations
committee, to execute the clause of the
treaty calling for the payment of 20
billion gold mark.
Germawy's Violation
"Germany," he said, "has violated
the treaty in essential clauses: dis-
armament, reparation and the trial of
accused officers. Thus the sanction as
provided for in the treaty are applica-
ble and just, as we have applied
them,"
The Allied commission of control, he
declared, was working under :the ad-
vice of Marshals Wilson and Poch and
might be depended upon to meet the
requirements as to disarmament of
Germany.
COOLIDGE ?LECTURES -ON
AUSTRIAN TREATY TODAY
Prof. Archibald C. Coolidge, of the
history department of Harvard uni-
versity, who speaks on "The Austrian
Peace Treaty" at 4:15 o'clock this
afternoon In Natural Science auditor-
ium, is a man of long experience in
foreign affairs and as a lecturer as is
shown by his record in these two
fields of endeavor.
Professor Coolidge served as sec-
retary of the American legation at St.
Petersburg, Russia, in 1890. Two
years later he occupied a similar po-
sition at Vienna, after which he was
made instructor in history in Harvard
university. He accompanied ex-Pres-
ident Taft on his trip to the Philip-
pine Islands in 1906. In 1908 he
ascended to a professorship. During
the Peace conference he served as
chief of mission to Vienna.
Acting in the capacity of a Harvard
extension lecturer, Professor Coolidge
made a tour of French universities in
1906-1907, spending considerable time

at the University of Sorbonne. He
was made exchange professor at the
University of Berlin in 1913. Profes-
sor Coolidge is director of the Har-
vard library, a member of the Amer-
ican Historical association, and of the
Academy of Political and Social Sci-
ence. He has written several books
of a historical nature, the best known
of which are "The United States as a
World Power" and "The Origins of the
Triple Alliance."

VARSITY DEBATERS WILL MEET
WISCONSIN TEAM H ERE T ONiGHT
VARSITY DEBATING TEAM WHICH MEETS WISCONSIN IN HILL AUD-
ITORIUM TONIGHT. THEY ARE LEFT TO RIGHT: ROBERT B.
RITTER, '22, EARL F. BOXELL, '23L, AND DEVERA STEINBERG, '22.

In the sixth annual Mid-Western de-
bate Michigan's affirmative debating
team meets the Wisconsin negative
debating squad promptly at 8 o'clock
tonight in Hill auditorium. The
question for discussion is as follows:
Resolved, That the government of the
United States should at once officially
recognize the Soviet government of
Russia.
Prof. A. T. Weaver, of Wisconsin,
will preside. There will be opportun-
ity for a forum discussion at the end
of the regular debate, when questions
in writing by the audience will be
answered by the debaters.
The first peaker for the Wisconsin
team is Charles D. Assootky, '21, who
was a member of the Wisconsin team
last year and has also had experience
in the intersociety debate which is

the most important oratorical func-
tion in the Badger school.
Martin R. Kreiwaldt, '22, the second
speaker for the Wisconsin squad has
had no previous experience. The
third speaker, I. Arnold Perstein, was
a member of the last year's team.
Earl F. Boxwell, '23L, the first
speaker for the Michigan affirmative
team, is the president of the Alpha Nu
Debating society and while a freshman
represented this society in the fresh-
man debate.
Robert B. Ritter, '22, of Oakwood, is
the second speaker for the affirmative,
is a former president of Alpha Nu so-
ciety and a former member of the
freshman debating squad.
Devera Steinberg, '22, was on the
Traverse City high school debating
squad for two years. She is a mem-
ber of the Athena Literary society.

I

T

SENIOR ENGINEERS
Today is the last opportunity
to pay class dues. They will be
collected from 8 to 12 o'clock on
the second floor of the Engineer-
ing building, over the arch.
In accordance with a motion
passed by the class only the
names of those men whose class
dues are paid in full will be
printed in the class invitations.
J. A. BARGY, Class Treasurer.

25 FRATERNITIES
COMPETE IN MEETI
Featured by a representation of 251
fraternities, with a list of entries to-
taling approximately 150, the intra-
fraternity track meet got off to a good
start last night in Waterman gymna-
sium.
Dunleavy, of Sigma Alpha- Epsilon,
was the outstanding star of the eve-
ning, qualifying in both hurdle events
and in the shot put. Lambda Chi Al-'
pha defeated Phi Sigma Kappa in the'
finals of the tug of war.
Due to a change in the schedule of
events, which was announced at the!
meet, the preliminaries in the high
jump and pole vault will be held on
Monday evening, and on Monday and
Tuesday evenings the one-lap and
medley relays will be run off.
REGENTS TO HOLD MONTHLY
MEETING AT BURTON'S HOME
Arrangements have been made for
the Regents to hold their monthly
meeting at the home of President Mar-
ion L. Burton on March 25. The
change from their usual place of
meeting in the Regents' room in the
Law building was made because of
the condition of President Burton, who
will not be able to leave his home
within the next week, although it is
thought that he will have regained
sufficient strength to confer with the
Regents on all, matters which will
come before them.

Opera Tickets
InW ig Demand
An advance ticket sale which has to
date been the largest of any previous,
yesterday assumed such proportions
that the applications which have been
received call for almost every seat to
the Thursday and Friday night per-
formances of "Top o' th' Mornin',"
which opens at the Whitney theater
Tuesday evening, March 29.
Members of the cast, chorus and
committees, full paid life members and
participating life members of the
Union have reserved all but a very
few of the poorer seats to the week-
end performances. A few good seats
to the Saturday afternoon matinee re-
main unsold, but the orders which
have been received have reserved a
good share of that performance.
Annual members who will be hand-
ed order envelopes beginning at 9
o'clock this morning at various points
in the lobby of the Union, will be
strongly urged to make three prefer-
ences for the performances.
Ensemble rehearsals are being held
this week, the opera being run
through completely each day in the
workkshop. "We are fully a week
ahead of where we were last year,"
declared E. Mortimer Shuter, direct-
or, yesterday, "and we could put on
the show next week if we had to."
Special effort is being made to stage
the Tuesday evening performance in a
style and on a scale as large as the
opening of a theater. Every energy of
the castsand chorus as well as the di-
rector is being bent towards begin-
ning the run here in a manner which
is designed to make the first night one
of the best performances of the week.
Capital Punishment Bill Defeated
Lansing, March 11.-A bill propos-
ing re-establishment of optional capi-
tal punishment was defeated in the
lower house of the Michigan legisla-
ture today. The measure lacked 2
votes of the 51 necessary for pass-
age.

HONOR PLAN TRIAL,
TERMED01SUCCESS~
I ajority of Instructors in Favor of
Continuance of System Among
Seniors
SOPH LITS EXTEND APPROVAL
AND PROMISE CO-OPERATION
Members of the Senior literary class
at a meeting yesterday afternoon gave
further evidence of their interest in
the .honor system and approval of its
success in the recent examinations by
unanimously adopting the report of
the class honorary committee.
This report, which summarizes the
results of the recent questionnaires
sent to variousrinstructors in whose
classes the honor system was tried in
the recent examinations, is to be sent
to Dean John R. Effinger, of the liter-
ary college, if it is again accepted at
the next class meeting to be held at 4
o'clock Wednesday in 205 Mason hall.
Majority Favor Plan
Seventeen instructors out of the 20
to whom the questionnaires were sent
reported that they considered the hon-
or examinations, which they held,
successful. The report says: "Practi-
cally all those who considered the re-
cent examinations successful express-
ed their willingness to hold subse-
quent examinations under the honor
system in the same courses in which
they held such final bluebooks last se-
mester."
The report concluded: "It is the
hope of the committee that this mat-
ter will be considered by you and, if
possible, we would like to have fur-
ther opinion on the matter, say
through a discussion at some faculty
meeting. We believe that the trial has
proved a success and that, If proper-
ly safeguarded the system can be
gradually expanded until it includes
i the whole literary college. We real-
ize, however, that this will take con-
siderable time and it is to the secur-
ing of a sound foundation that we are
now looking rather than to the rapid
spread of the system."
Sophs Offer Co-operation
Robert Rice, '23, appearing as a
representative of the sophomore class
honor system committee, read a re-
port which expressed the spirit of co-
operation with which the class of '23
will support a honor system adopted
by the upper classes.
Several matters of class interest
were discussed, among which was a
class party, either a formal or a mix-
er. The matter will be taken up again
at the meetingg next Wednesday, at
which time the two student council-
men will be elected. The small at-
tendance prohibited decisive action.
Announcements were made to the
effect that senior caps and gowns
should be ordered at George Moe's
and senior canes at Wagner's on State
street as soon as possible. Quick ac-
tion on these two matters was asked
in order to be ready for "Swing Out"
on May 5.
Reports Requested
The Student council asked that all
the chairmen of senior class commit-
tees file reports as to their functions
and proceedings so that classes in the
future may see and be guided by ex-
act history of similar committees.
This action is to be followed by re-
questing subsequent senior classes to
contribute reports.
Westerners Demand Import Embargo
Washington, March 17. - An ap-

I peal to President Harding to place an
immediate embargo in imports of
wool, hides, meat, butter, lemons, cot-
ton seed oil and cotton, has been
made by a group of Western senators
- and representatives, Senator Cameron,
Republican, Arizona, announced to-
night. The situation facing the pro-
ducers of those products also has'beer
laid before Secretaries Wallace, Hoov-
er and Falls.

JUNIOR GIRLS TO
PRESENT ANNUAL
COMEDY TONIGHT
Following the senior supper which
will be held at 6 o'clock this evening,
more than 325 girls will march in a
body to attend the opening perform-
ance of "Selina Sue," the Junior
Girls' play at the Whitney theater.
Commenting on the play, Dean My-
ra B. Jordan said: "It seems to me
that this year's Junior Girls' play is
more than a musical comedy. The
lines are good, the plot Is attractive,
and there are a number of good]
voices."
A tea dance for the entertainment
of out-of-town visitors who are here
for the play will be given by the
Women's league from 4 to 6 o'clock
this afternoon in Barbour gymnasium.
ADVISORY BODY TO
ELECTPRESIDENT'
'Meeting Tonight Will Be Devoted to
Completing Organization of 4
Committee
FOUR SENIOR MEMBERS ARE
ELIGIBLE FOR THE OFFICE
Organization of the Student Advis-
ory committee will start immediate-
ly, a meeting having been a:ranged
for tonight at which the officers will
be elected. The four senior members
of the committee, Robert C. Angell,
'21, Robert F. Grindley, '21E, James
I. McClintock, '21L, and Robert E. Mc-
Kean, '21, are eligible for the presi-
dency. A secretary will also be
elected.
The first matter to be considered by
the committee will be to obtain the
sanction of the University authorities
for the self-government plan. Action'
will be taken tonight to place the
matter before Joseph A. Bursley,
Dean of Students. No opposition is
expected to the recognition of the com-
mittee because of the strong approval
to the move on the part of the stu-
dent body indicated by Wednesday's
election.

March Chimes Touches Variety Of
Vital And Timely Campus TOics

FANDANCO OFFERS
MUSIC AND DANCE
FRO0M MANY LANDS,
NUMBERS OMITTED YET PRO-
GRAM NOT TOO MUCH
SHORTENED
ATMOSHERE TRANSFERS
FROM CHINA TO SPAIN
Indian Playlet Presented In Novel
Manner; Falcone Gives
Solos
Applause for every act testified to
the favor with which the All-Nation
Fandango, presented last night in Hill
auditorium, was received. Although
several numbers were omitted, the
program was not too much short-
ened.
"Spanish Duet," sung by Robert
McCandless, '21M, and Lovisa Youngs.
School of Music, received the greatest
approval. The pair gave only one en-
core.
Several varieties of dances, includ-
ing "The Fan Dance," by Yugi Osa-
wa, grad., and Yone Morita, '23, "Chi-
nese Chicken Dance," by Chia Teh
Yeh, "A Colonial Dance" by Miss
Marian Woods' dancing class, and
"An Egyptian Dance" by Mme. Jean-.
ette Kruszka, were well received.
Leonardo Falcone, School of Mu-
sic, played three mellow trombone so-
los, Kuni Kichlu, '21E, and Co. gave
an Indian playlet, and Mrs. Alma H.
Norsworthy-McKinnon read "Saundera
McGlaskin's Courtship." Ramon Ca-
pistrano, grad., sang several songs ac-
companied by Emeterio Roa, grad.
F. C. Liu, '21L, general chairman of
the committee for the arrangement of
the Fandango, made the preliminary
announcement.
Fresh Glee Club Elects Officers
At last night's meeting of the Fresh-
man Glee club Ralph H. Excell, '24,
was elected president; Frend R. Bliss,
'24, vice-president; Clayton G. Hale,
'24, leader; and Arnold E. Pratt, '24E,
librarian. Gordon F. Godley, '22E, who
is in general charge of the club, act-
ed as chairman of the meeting.

Newsy and up-to-the-minute to al
degree exceeding any previous issue,]
the March Chimes went on sale Thurs-1
day and caught the campus eye with
a dozen different and timely appeals.'
Far and away the focusing-point of-
the whole number is the first of twoI
articles by J. R. Adams and O. C.
Johnson both of the rhetoric depart-
ment, on "Student Activities: A Crit-
ical Analysis." The two instructors,
sometimes with a satire which their
rather superficial though sincere and
time-taking investigation hardly war-
rants, carefully segregate and define
and classify all the activities of thel
campus.
Campus Activities Criticized
They dissect each group and lay bare
the cold facts of hours spent and how
spent, as they see it. They tell the
purposes of the organizations and howl
poorly, usually, they are lived up to.
Of Gargoyle they declaim: "When we
realize the amount of effort that is
put into Gargoyle we should do one
of two things: either we should re-
gard and honor it more highly than
is our custom, or we should endeavor
to secure its suppression on grounds
of extravagance." They take a
healthy crack at the tap room, and an-
other-in three parts--at The Daily.
Next month will come the suggestion
of a remedy.
Always interesting, the article is
certain to be read by everyone in the

least curious about campus conditions.
Its statistics are live and valuable,
though usually more suggestive than
conclusive, as the writers justly con-
cede.
Sketches of the life and ways of
Denby and Daugherty, Michigan's
quota of alumni in the Harding cab-
inet, lead off the issue; two splendid
articles on law as a career, one by
Harrison B. McGraw, '92L, the other
by Dean Henry M. Bates, keep up the
interest; "A Close-Up of the New
Dean," which gives an intimate view
of a personality now in the University
limelight, Joseph A. Bursley, has a
particularly current appeal, as has al-
so "Splashing with Michigan's Tank
Team," by Wallace F. Elliott, '23, and
a page of photos of "Top o' th' Morn-
in'," showing the Opera boys and
"girls" getting properly Shutered.
Basketball Spirit Defended
It is hard to see why Michigan
should have to bite the dust in quite
the humiliation which the editorial ac-
companying the cartoon of "The Man
Who Lost the Championship" pre-
scribes for us, nor take the cactus
wreath of poor sportsmanship from
the entire Conference - including I1-
linois. Michigan's basketball spirit
had a couple of splotches on it, but
they were incidental and of a sort to
be faced anywhere. The great body
t of court fans were always loyal, and
(Continued on Page Eight)

TICKETS
--at--
GRAHAM'S

Junior

Girls'

Play

"Selina Sue"

SHOWS
Friday and Saturday
Evenings
PRICES
2.00,1.0,1.00
Matinee on Saturday
Prices 1.510,1.00

WHITNEY THEATRE March 18th and 19th
(This Space donated By Biu-Maize Blossom Shop)
* .u..E..E.E.ur . . u...........arr u dr. I.h au ..m..I...i..li I Ii1 E1 NI tt I t 1tt1 N H11tt!!1im li tltmuhui uhuhhUiil uialiiiiiUiiE uuiu IIIIIInIIIInnnInIUI lt1N~iIIfhIIU1IU

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