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March 17, 1921 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TEACHERS TO MEET
HERE MARCH 28-29
On MarcI 30, 31, and April 1 the
Michigan Schoolmasters' club will hold
its 56th annual meeting it1 Ann Arbor.
On March 28 and 29 the annual meet-
ing of the Michigan Association of
Superintendents and- School Boards
will take place and on March 29 and
30 the short-term institute will be
held in Lane hall
At the same time there will be show-
ings of library and art exhibits, the
library exhibits being ,on exhibition
in- the main corridor of the General
Library and the art work being shown
in the Alumni Memorial building.
Prominent educators who will speak
at the institute include Prof. David
Snedden, of Columbia university; Dean
Cubberly; of the University of Cali-
fornia; Prof. C. M. Andrews, of Yale;
Dr. Clark Wissler, curator of the Am-
erican Museum of Natural History,
Washington, D. C., and Prof. George
H. Chase, of Harvard
- MICHICAN PROFESSORS WRITE
FOR EDUCATIONAL REVIEW
In the Educational Review for
March, there is an article on "History
Teaching and American Citizenship,"
by Prof. W. H. Hobbs, of the geology
department, and one by Prof. C. O.
Davis, of the educational department,
on "Citizenship and the High School."
Professor Hobbs in his article ppts
the lesson of war, as the necessity of
prepared defense, and the menace of
pacifism. He then goes into the*new
jistory text books and their reactions
from the war. He reviews one text
without stating its name, and finds it
favorable to bolshevism, socialism,
and propaganda for the league.
His article is concluded with the
statement that "There must be neith-
er teaching of false doctrines nor cov-
ering of disagreeable truths."
Professor Davis in his article lam-
ents the lack of systematic training
in civic responsiblities. He suggests
that remedies- may be found in civic
and social courses in iigh schools,
and In good citizen leagues.
Use the advert ing columns of The
Michigan Daily to rach the best of
" Ann Arbor's buyers.-Adv.

MICHIGAN ALUMNI IN NEW
YORK AND BOSTON BANQUET
Telegrams giving the latest condi-
tion of President Marion L. Burton
were read at the alumni dinners held
at New York, March 10, and Boston;
March 11. President Burton was to
have made the principal address at
both gatherings, but his illness rend-
ered attendance out of the question.-
Thp alumni meetings were highly
successful and were attended by pro-
minent university men throughout the
country. Among well known Michi-
gan alumni present at the New York
banquet were: Prof. Jeremiah W.
Jenks, '78, of .New. York university;
Chancellor E. E. Brown, of New York
university; while Prof. Paul H.
Hanus, '78, and Prof. E. L. Mark, 171,
of Harvard university, attended the
Boston dinner. James L. Swift, '95L,1
ex-attorney general of the common-
wealth of Massachusetts, presided as
toastmaster at the Boston banquet.
The University of Michigan was
represented at the alumni gatherings
by Dean John R. Effinger, of the liter-
ary college, Dean M. E. Cooley, of the
engineering college, Regent Junius E.
Beal, and President-emeritus Harry B.
Hutchins.
OBSERVATORY TO BE OPEN
TO PUBLIC THIS SUMMER
An opportunity will be offered dur-
ing the Summer session for students
and the general public to visit the
Obesrvatory three times on July 11,

12, and 13, for the purpose of examin-
ing the instruments, according to Dean
E. H. Kraus, of the Summer session.
This chance is not given during the
regular session except to students who
take special courses. '.
Another special opportunity given
to summer students will be the course
in library methods given by Librarian
W. W. Bishop, a separate announce-
ment of which will be issued after the
regular announcement which'witl ap-
pear next week.
Kent hall, Newberry residence, and
Alumnae hall will be open for resid-
ence during the summer and the Dean
urges that all women who wish td
live in any of these-places get in touch
immediately with the social director,
as, according to present indications,
the demand for rooms will be unpre-
cedented.
SUnYER SESSION PLANS FOR
SPECIAL FRENCH FEATURES
A special feature of the Summer
session this year, according .to Dean
E. H. Kraus, will be a "French house"
where students of the language may
be surrounded by a real French at-
mosphere and where Wothing but
French will be spoken. This plan has
been tried with notable success at
other universities and Michigan had
a similar place for students of Ger-
mai before the war, but this is the
French department's first attempt in
this direction.
There will be 20 courses offered in
French during the session, the faculty

consisting of Prof. A. G. Canfield, Prof.f dom was our most important customerI

H. P. Thieme, Assistant Professors
McLaughlin, Talamon, Bursley, and
Adams, Dr Larned and Mr. Cloppet.
There will be two courses in Italian
and eight in Spanish offered.
Cuba Best U. S. Customer
Washington, Mar. 16-Cuba was
cited here today as the best market
in Latin America for American goods.
According to the report of the Depart-
ment of Commerce, the United King-
Mrs.T. L. Stoddard
Hair Shop
Try Our HOT OIL Shampoos
for
Falling Out Hair

during the calendar year 1919, Ameri-
can exports amounting to $2,278,000,-
SADDLE PONIES
427 So, MAIN STREET
Near Packard
Phone,1687-R

000. In the far East, Japan heads
list in purchase of American gc
China being next in line.
S H U B E R T
Broadway Brevities
of '1920

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COMFORTABLE AND
/ SPEEDY SERVICE
Our automobile livery service
was organized with one specific
idea in mind; safety and com-
fort of passengers. We drive
you wherever you desire to 'go
in cars that receive the best of
care and attention and you can
feel assured of cleanliness and
comfort. The charges are very
moderate.

CITY TAXI
PHONE 280'

Marceling
and Water Waving

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D En T ROIT
When We Are'Young

707. N. Univ. Phone 2652

THE EBER)BACH & SON CO.
Drugs
Laboratory Supplies
Chemicals
THE EBERBACH & SON CO.
200- 204 EAST LIBERTY STREET
E
WHITNEY T a RBOE MONDAY, MARCH 21,

TODAY

TheAmusement Centre
of Ann Arbor
LAST TIMES TODAY
Jesse L. Laskey
Presents
GEORGE
MELFORD'S
PRODUCTION
"Behold
My''Wife"

/ ----
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(7.'-
4/ ' 7-.
7/
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Jesse L. Lasky presents

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A DESIRE
FOR ANY TYPE OF DANCING
may easily be satisfied at
MLLE.
IEANETTE KRUZSKA'S
-DANCING STUDIO
A STHETIC DANCING
9Q)'T SHOE DANCING
TOE DANCING
BALL ROOM DANCING
We ali to Maske you graeful
ip pdfition to"k nowing steps
Ipstrictgrs
M1AT.. 1'RUZSJ<(A
PHjI4P MjLLERI, '23
Stu4Io- 24 E. Rurqn St.
Ekoue 208-9

s
sale TOMORROW

CECIL B.
DeMIJIJES
PRODUCTION
FORBID)EN
FRUIT
By Jeanie 1acpherson
A beautiful highsouled
woman, tied to a brutal
knave!
When lovq and hope in
another sprang, up, un-
bidden-
Come help her choose
between her heart and
"duty"
A realistic romance
clad fn a cloth of gold.

JI

.9 .1
A simple child of the Big North
Woods! Married by a prodigal
Fto shame his parents. Then
cruelly tumbled into the maze
of England's "society."
See her thrilling struggle 'twixt
nature and ci'vlizatio n- -at last
her triumph!--and the'prodigal
kneeling at her feet!
from Sir Gilbert Parker's
noted novel "The Trans-
lation of a Savage."
Tomorrow-Saturday
es

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two" Mill. w MR - -. - --- - , , I I
RON, I ,, - -.0 - I

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IT'S MUCH CHEAP4R TO
PAY THE PLUMEMS EE,
MHAN fIT ND
FOR THE
OLD M.D.
HERE'S one mighty good
way you can gpt out of
the doctor hllt and that
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tayy tha$ your ealth Will get-a
chance to sleep nights 4nd en-
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SHOWS PRICES
2:00 3:30 Evenings 30c
7:00 8:30 Matineem 20o
SUN DAY PAQNQAY TUESDAY
it Isd 4 qe. SR. Pars and ije. Nqw it 1 , l.l an et
O T IS SKINNER
AMERICA'S GREATEST ROMANTIC CHARACTER
ACTOR IN THE SCREEN VERSION OF HIS SUP-
REME STAGE SUCCESS
Bp EDWARD KNOBLOCK DIRECTED BY GASNIER
A ROBERTSON-COL ESUPER SPECIAL
HERE FOR THREE DAYS

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ANN ARBOR
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FRIDAY-SATURDAY

Jesse L. Lasky
i presents
CLAYTON

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J.7ie Price
A Hugh Ford Pr d
a aramounl~ich
The woman wanted a hoa
The man wanted the womi
The price of possession w
love. Come and see why neiti
would pay it until-?
DOVEDY-,Tea For Two"
KINOGRAMS BRAY-PICTO

89RENAK&MARTIN
PLUMBING EAUING
REPAIRING

DOUGLAS FA{ A KS
DogT ateHE NUT
Doug Islatest Picture showing for thellest time today

Phone 2452
ITH MAIN STREET

r~ cenw r-omF c ,ag nOAM IPfl . InePr in
"RED FOAM". Adapted from the Saturday Evening Post by the

III

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