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March 17, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HIE WEATHER
JDY AND SOMEWHAT
WAMI~ER TODAY J

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4I alli,

ASSOCIATED
PRESS

DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 114. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1921. PRICE FIVE EN

Calpus

AdOpts

Student

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OEAR SCNEY
SURPASSES ANY'
FRONT CURTAIN MADE BY CARL
BROMEL IN ANN
ARBOR
SCHIRMER WILL TAKE
ROLE OF MOLLY, MAIDI

LAST TOUCHES PUT
ON "SALINA SUE"
The cast and choruses of the Junior
Girls' play will be put through the
final dress rehearsal tonight at the
Whitney theater. Last night's re-
hearsal showed finish on the part of
all of the characters, and in the
songs and dances.
Final touches will be put on to-
night when the cast will go through
the play with all costuming and prop-
erties complete for the first time.
Since the publication of the names
of the choruses a new group includ-
ing the following girls has been
added:
Madolyn Kirkpatrick, Lela Witter,
Marguerite Walker, Muriel Kastner,
Etta Henry, E. Jean Watkins, Juanita
Waits, Martha Shepard, Florence
Brown, Margaret Tibbals, Geraldine
Troy, Dorothy Prescott, Harriet Col-
cord, Dorothy Dubuar, Barbara Wag-
ner, Isabel Wolfstein.
UNIQUE ACTS:/IN
ALL NATION SHOW1

One Indoor and One Outside
in 1921 1 uslcai.
Comedy

Scene

Final retouchings were made yes-
terday on the front curtain of "Top
o' th' Mornin'," se nery for which is
said to be better than for any pre-
vious Union opera. Unlike other
years, 'the curtain was designed and
painted by Carl Bromel, Union scenic
artist, himself in the workshop. Last
year the front curtain for "George
Did It" was obtained from New York.
An entirely new effect will be se-
cured in the manner of drawing the
blue satin curtain on which are
painted grotesque birds, when it will
part 'in the middle and be gathered
in straight lines on the sides. A spe-
cial mechanical track contrivance
which will operate overhead is the
means of acpomplishing the unusual
result.
Scenery= for the first act, which is
laid in tho interior of the Blue Goose
Ind, ireland, will show the entrance
hall of the building, with a cheerful
Are burning in the large stone fire-
place at the end. Practical windows
higher than the fireplace will let in
the sunshine, as will the windows in
the alcove on the floor level. The
walls are done in greenish blue
above 'the tile base, which is four
feet high all around the room.
The outside scene in the garden of
the Patrick O'Dare estate; in the see-
oud act, will give a view of the
mountains, in the far distance, and
practical rocks, some of them 15 feet
high in the foreground. A tiny stream
will trickle through the rocks and in-
to the real fountain. Flowers and
grasses will grow about the pool and
on the mountainside. Characters
will come down through the moun-
tains and between the massive rocl
into the quiet garden of the scene.
A side view of O'Dare home will ap-
pear at the right of the stag'e.
A radical departure from the scen-
ery of last year is the continuity of
scenes in "Top o' th' Mornin'." Sev-
eral periods of time were represent-
ed in awmore, or less disjunctive fash-
ion in "George Did It," but the mu-
sical comedy plot this year dispos-
es of that difficulty. The settings
lend themselves well to lighting ef-
fects which are to be used exten-
sively.
The role of Molly, bar maid at the
Inn, which was erroneously report-r
ed to have been taken by A. E. Al-
bert, '22E, will be filled by A. F.
Schirmer, '22E.
PROF. FRIDAY TO SPEAK AT
ROTARY CLUB CONVENTION
"Business Depression and the Way
Out" is the subject of the address
which Prof. David Friday,' of the
economics department, will deliver at
the two-day convention of the ninth
district Rotary clubs at Saginaw,
which commences tomorrow.
Professor Friday is going in the
place of President Marion L. Bur-
ton, who is unable to attend because
of illness.

PER CENT IIN U1
OFr EMPLOYED IS
STILL ON DECLINE,
FEBRUARY SHOWS DECREASE OF
ONE-HUNDREDTH OVER
PREVIOUS MONTH
ONE THIRD GAIN SINCE
JANUARY IN DETROIT
Labor Department Reports General
Labor Improvement in Mid-
Western States
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 16.-The num-
ber of persons employed in the Unit-
ed States continued to decrease dur-
ing February, the department of la-
bor employment service announced
tonight in a monthly supply of the
unemployed. The decrease for last
month as compared with January was
estimated at one per cent.
The employment service made no
attempt to estimate the size of job-
less workers, but its figures showed
that 1,423 firms, located in the 65
principal industrial centers of the
country, had in their employ Feb. 28
a total of 1,626,958 workers as com-
pared with 1,643,253 on Jan. 31.
The percentage of employed show-
ed the greatest increase in Chatta-
nooga, Tenn., amounting to 57.6 over
January. Detroit also while showing
to be recovering from the general de-
(Continued on Page Eight)
Chicago Pastor to Speak Here
Frederick W. Shannon, pastor of
the Central church, Chicago, will
speak on "Lincoln's Message to
America" at the Methodist church at
7:30 o'clock next- Sunday evening.

'24' LITS TO HOLD
PARTY SATURDAY
Plans for the Freshman lit party
which is to be given Saturday after-
non from 3 to 5 o'clock at the Union
were the main things discussed at
yesterday's meeting of the freshman
literary class.
Contrary to the idea of many, this
party is not the annual Fresh Frolic
but an informal dancing party exclu-
sively for freshmen literary stu-
dents. The Fresh Frolic, which is a
formal affair, will be given some time
in May.
The entertainment committee an-
nounces that the plan is for men and
women to atend the party singly as
well as in copies. Tickets may be
obtained Friday and Saturday morn-
ing at the booth in University hall.
The price is 50 cents per ticket, one
ticket admitting one person.
2 CHOICES FOR UNION
TICKETS ARE GOING FAST, FRI-
DAY TO BE BIG '
DAY
By neglecting to make more than
one preference for performances of
the 1921 Union opera, students are
increasing the possibility of getting,
poor seats to "Top o' th' Mornin'."
Only he very poorest seats remain
unsold to several performances, while
on other nights the best 'seats in the
house can be obtained.
After all seats 'to certain peir-
formances are sold, and applications
with only one preference expressed
are sent in, those applications will
automatically remain unfilled until a
later date. 'It is most important
that every application contain two
(Continued on Page Eight)

I'

MEN OF UNIVERSITY APPROVE PLAN
OF SEL OENETI N NEARBLY
UNANIMOUS VOTE OF 2102 TO07

SENIOR LIT NOTICE
There will be an important
meeting of the senior literary
class at 4 o'clock this afternoon
in room 205, Mason hall. A
Student councilman is to be
elected at this meeting, and oth-
er important business it to be
discussed. Tentative plans for
the development of the honor
system will be presented for the
approval of the class.
Class dues will be payable fol-

lowing the meeting.

Biggest Undertaking in the
of Annual Produc-
tion

HistoryI

ONLY ONE AMERICAN ACT ON
PROGRAM; OTHERS FOREIGN
In a production which will be
strictly cosmopolitan because of the
number of nationalities represented,
only one American act is scheduled
for the "All Nations Fandanga" to be
given at 8 o'clock tonight in Hill aud-
itorium. The Cosmopolitan club, un-
der whose auspices the show will be
given, has organized it with the pur-
pose of making it educational as well
as entertaining. It is said to be the
largest undertaking since the club
originated its annual production.
The American act will be a co-
lonial dance in which 16 University
women, membershof Miss Marion
Woods' dancing class in Barbour
gymnasium, will attempt to bring out
the dignity and grace of the dance
of that period. Eight will imper-
sonate men, while the others will be
costumed as ladies. Four groups, of
two men and two women each, will
do the dancing, accompanied by pi-
ano, violin and voice. There will be
little difference in the stature of the
characters as they have been care-
fully selected for uniform height.
One of the oriental acts will be the
Japanese fan dance by Yiki Osawa,
grad., and Yone Moriya, '23, who will
appear in gowns of bright and gay
colors. The interpretation of youth
and spring is the aim of the act.
A variety .of special dancing, mu-
sic by t he Union orchestra, charac-
terization and musical acts, typical
of 12 nationalities, constitutes the
balance of the program. Tickets are
on sale for 50 cents at the book
stores.
TWO STUDENT COUNCIL
COMMITTEES APPOINTED
Two committees, one to take charge
of the spring games and the other
for Swing-out, were appointed last
night by the Student council.
Roswell P. Dillon, '21E, Hugh E.
Wilson,, '22L,, and Donald J. Thorp,
'21, will compose the spring games
committee, with Dillon as chairman.
For the swing-out committee, Renaud
Sherwood, '22, is chairman, while the
other two members are George E.
Gregory, '22E, and Thornton W. Sar-
gent, '22.

)Yiciigan Varsity Debating Team
Leaves Fo r Illini Contest Today

"IRISH QETO
NOTRELI6IOUS"
- DE VALERA
Erin President in First Interview
Since Return from Here Says
U. S. Has Wrong Idea
ENGLAND PLAYING O WRONG
QUALITIES OF I ISH PEOPLE
(By Associated Press)
Dublin, March 16. -- Eamonn De
Valera, president of the Irish repub-
lic, has given a correspondent the
first interview he has accorded any
newspaper representative since his
return from the United States. Mr.
De Valera told of the impressions he
had brought back from America.
"The saddest thing there to me,"
he said, "was to see the Irish ques-
tion treated by so many people as if
it were a religious wrangle. It is not
a religious question, even insofar as
the differences between the north
and south are concerned.
"England," he said, "is trying to
win by playing on human weakness-
es. As a matter of fact, though it
does not realize it. England" is play-
ing' not on the weakness #but the
strongest qualities of the Irish peo-
ple - their spiritual ;qualities. The
young men of Ireland are saying to
themselves: 'At best the span of life'
is only 70 years. We must all die;
so why not now in circumstances like
these?'"
HAAS URGES U.S.
AID FOR TURKEY
"We, as Americans, should be in-
terested in they problems of the Near
East for our own sakes," said Cyril
W. Haas, '04M, when speaking on
"Conquering Disease in the Near
East" in Lane hall last night. Dr.
Haas confined his lecture mainly to
a discussion of Asiatic Turkey and
gave an account of his experiences
in that district while there in the in-
terests of humanity.
"Medical men should tend towards
idealism rather than the mere class-
ification ' of diseases. They should
co-operate in doing for Turkey what
American doctors have already done
for Panama. American doctors and
nurses can save Turkey. The Turk
is not impossible. He may be lifted-1
and it is up to us to lift him," he
said. Dr. Haas terminated his lec-
ture by answering and discussing
questions.

VOTE MUCH LARGER THAN WAS
EXPECTED BY COM-
MITTEE
RESULT SHOWS UNIFIED
SPIRIT AMONG STUDENTS'
Angell, Grindley, McCflntock, MoKean
Are Senior Members of
Board
By the overwhelming vote of 2,102
to 72 the men of the University yester-
day voiced their approval of the stu-
dent self-government policy as work-
ed out in the Student Advisory com-
mittee plan. The vote was much heav-
ier than was expected by the Student
council committee in charge, and it"
compares well with the total number
of ballots usually cast in the All-cam-
pus election. Last year the total for
the All-campus election was 3,188.
Seniors elected to the new com-
mittee were: Robert Angell, '21,
(1,196) Robert Grindley, '21E,
(1,125); James McClintock, '21L,
(1,009) ; and Robert McKean, '1
(830).
The junior members of the advisory
board are: Douglas Dow, '22E, (774);
and Walter B Ilea, 422, (771).
"The result of the campus vote was
most satisfactory," said Clarence N.
Johnston, '21E, who was chairman of
the election committee. "We did not
expect such a heavy vote, and the
committee feels that the excellent
showing will do away with any facul-
ty opposition that might exist to the
self-government plan."
I
VALUEOFADE GRTISIN
DISCUSSED, BY JICKING
SPEAKER TREATS DIFFERn:TT
PHASES OF SUBJECT BEFORE
COMMERCE CLUB
"Advertising, Its Part in Selling,"
was the subject with which C. M.
Jickling, '17, head of the direct ad-
vertising department of' the Evans-
Winter-Hebb company, of Detroit, ad-?
dressed the Commerce club last night
in Natural Science auditorium.
Emphasising throughout that ad-
vertising did not replace salesmen but'
was an important factor in the sell-
ing process, Jickling gave a short his-
tory of the subject and then proceeded
to give the functions 4f advertising,
which he defined as "the application
of the force of publicity to business."
Advertising Helps All
Jickling went on to show how ad-
vertising helped the producer, dealer,
and the consumer and said that he
did not think that historians gave
advertising the credit it deserved for
developing business in the 18th and
19th centuries. He saidthat it is es-
(Continued on Page Eight),
PRES. BURTON IIIPROYES-
PERMITTED TO SIT UP
President Marion L. Burton's condi-
tion has improved, and for the first
time since he was taken sick his tem-
perature was reported as perfectly
normal.
Wednesday morning he was per-
mitted by physicians to sit up in bed
for several minutes, but he is not
strong enough to be allowed to sit
up in a chair.

MICHIGAN'S NEGATIVE DEBATING TEAM WHICH LEAVES TODAY FOR
ILLINOIS: ED RAMSDELL, JOHN BACON, AND RALPH JOHNSON,'
ALL '23 CLASSMEN.

Michigan's negative debating team
which leaves this morning for Cham-
paign under the guidance of Pro-
fessor Hollister is a young team, be-
ing entirely composed of sopho-
mores, but is one in which the men
have had considerable debate experi-
ence.
John A. Bacon, '23, of Kansas City,
Kan., received his early training in
the Central High school of that city.
While at the Kansas school he won
the silver and gold declaming med-
als in successive years. Bacon will
be the first speaker for Michigan's
negative squad in the Mid-Western

debate with Illinois Friday, March
18.
Ralph Johnson, '23, the second
speaker for Michigan, graduated from
Central High school of Grand Rapids.
While at Central he was a member of
the Lincoln-Wilson debating society.
Johnson is also a member of the
Adelphi House of Representatives at
Michigan.
Edward T. Ramsdell, '23, of De-
troit, won the High School oratori-
cal contest given by Central High
school of Detroit in 1912. Ramsdell
was also on the Freshman debating
team and is a member of the Alpha
Nu Debating society.

r

G1

"Tonoight's The Night", as St, Patrick
might say, The Elaborate "All Nations
Fandango" at HILL AUDITORIUM
TICKETS AT BgOOKSTORES 50 CENTS

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