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March 16, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-16

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THE WEATHER
RAIN OR SNOW

r Lwr ka

~1ati

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIORT 1TIRE
SERVICE

TODAY

IIAIII M _.. ' }

VOL. XXXI. No. 113.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 1921.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ADVISORY COMMITTEE UP OVOTE

TURNER WILLING
FOR DEBATEON
IRISH__QUESTION
PROFESSOR ANSWERS. CHALLENGE
AND GIVES REASONS FOR
DECISION
REFUSES ORAL CONTEST;
DESIRES WRITTEN DUEL
Suggests Changing Subject to "Should
U. S. Recognize the Independ-
ence of Irelandr'
"I am willing to debate the leading
exponents of Sinn Fein in the news-
papers of this country, but I must re-
fuse your offer to debate orally with
Miss Mary MacSwiney, March 29, in
Cleveland," said Prof. .E. R. Turner, of
the history department, yesterday in
a communication to the American As-
sociation for the Recognition of the
Irish iepublic.
Association Challenges Turner
Jan. 29 the association sent Profes-
sor Turner a challenge to. debate Miss
Mary MacSwiney on the Irish ques-
tion. He received this (soon after a
written debate between him and Miss
MacSwiney had been published side
by side in more than 400 daily news-
papers in the United States. On
March 10, the association telegraphed
the professoroffering him $1,000 to de-
bate Lord Mayor Donal O'Callaghan,.
of Cork, on the samd' subject. This
he refused a few days ago.
"If Mr. Arthur Griffith, alleged found-
er and real leader of Sinn Fein, Pro-
fessor DeValera, by some known as
'President of the Irish Republic,' and
Mr. D. O'Connell; erstwhile director
of the Irish eiational bureau in Wash-
ington, wish to collaborate in writing
for publication a statement on the
Irish question, I shall also prepare a
statement, if they desire, and the two
can probably be widely published as a
debate," the professor continued in
the communication. "Should Miss
MacSwiney also desire to participate,
I am only too glad to extend my
cordial invitation to her."
Professor Offers New Subject
Professor Turner also said that he
did not believe the question suggested
for the proposed meeting between Miss
MacSwiney and himself, "Great Brit-
ain's Government of Ireland Has Been
Just and Should Be Continued," would
do justice to the contentions of the
association. He suggested that should
the written debate be held, the title
be changed to "Should the United
States Recognize the Independence of
Ireland?"
In refusing to .debate orally, Pro-
fessor Turner said, in part: "It has
occurred to me that any organization
proposing to ,arrange such a debate
would have to consider carefully what
arrangements should be made to en-
sure the debate bding carried on with-
out interruption or odisturbance. I
have received several confidential let-
ters lately, saying that certain fac-
tions would not even allow me to
speak in Cleveland.
Trouble Would Be Unpleasant
,"Therefore, should any such occur-
rence develop from the meetings you
proposed, it would be unpleasant for
me and do great injustice to the cause
of the Irish visitors whom you are
entertaining. Furthermore, a large
assembly is not usually the place
where any critical judgment can be
made, nor is any assembly large enough
for a sufficient number of people to at-

tend. It is for these reasons, that I
suggest another newspaper debate."
"ADVERTISING" IS SUBJECT
OF C01RERCE CLUB SPEAKER
C. M. Jickling, '17, of Detroit. who
speaks on "Advertising" under the
auspices of the Commerce club at R
o'clock this evening in Natural Sci-
ence auditorium, is head of the direct
advertising department of the Evans-
Winter-Hebb company of Detroit, and
the editor of "Three Circles," the
house organ. There will be a round
table discussion after the lecture, ad-
mission to which will be only to

A, DATE WITH DUTY
Every man in the University has a date with Duty today.
His rendezvous will be any one of four balloting places on
the campus any time between 9 and 3 o'clock; his business, to
cast a vote in favor of the new plan of student government which
Student council committees have drawn up and which a senior
convocation has unanimously ratified; and to check off the four
best seniors and the two best juniors on the list of nominees for
the Student Advisory committee.
The work of a minute, measured in time, this little job of
marking one (X) beside a "Yes,"' and six more beside so many
names, is going to count for a great advance in the self-respect-
ing desire of Michigan students to prove their capacity to gov-
ern themselves. It's the first step. If every man sees its im-
portance he'll not only vote but be PREPARED to.vote: he'll
find out what men have a record and a character entitling them
to a place on the new committee.
The body we are choosing today will represent the entirde
male student body in the presentation of its ideas and sugges-
tions to the Dean of Students. Whether it shall be a figurehead
or a real and active force for co-operation and for advancement
of the student self-government movement depends both on the
sort of backing we give it today and the sort of men we elect to
serve upon it.
VOTE TODAY - AND VOTE RIGHT!

DBA0TERS OPPOSE
WISCONSIN FRIDAY1
Varsity Teams in No-Decision Meet;
Affirmative Here, Negative
at Illinois
RECOGNITION OF SOVIET
GOVERNMENT IS QUESTION
Michigan debating teams meet Wis-
consin at Ann Arbor on Friday even-
ing in Hill auditorium and Illinojs
at Urbana the same night in the Mid-
Western debate, the subject of which
is: "Resolved - That the United
States Immediately Recognize Soviet
Government inf. Russia."
The affirmative team for Michigan
consists of Devera Steinberg, '22, Earl
Boxell, '21, and Robert Ritter, '22, in

i1

z

SHORT, SNAPPY ACTS C
Of "ALL NATIONS' FAN

CHIMES TRYOUTS WANTED
Tryoutstare wanted for the
business staff of the Chimes.
Those desiring to tryout who are
scholastically eligible are re-
quested to report between 3 and
5 o'clock today and tomorrow
afternoon atthe Chimes office in
Sthe Press building.'
* .I
icket Sale For
Opera Continues,
Mail order envelopes for tickets to
"Top. o' th' Mornin'," which opens
Tuesday, March 29, at the Wnitney
theater, will be sent 'to participating
life members of the Union today. Ali
full paid life members who received
precedence Monday and yesterday
will now have only the privileges of
participating life members, who in
turn must give way to annual mem-
bers on Friday. Each group has been
given two days in which to send or-
ders, since the mail orders began last
Saturday.
The biggest day of the ticket salesr
will probably be Friday, when annual
members will be handed mail order
cnvelopes, commencing at 9 o'c1ock
Friday morning, in the lobby of the
Union.
It is urged that all applications forl
tickets contain several preferences
for performances since better seats
perhaps may be obtained at a second
choice performance than at a first
choice.
American Council Organized
Washington, March 15.-Represent-
atives of 80 civic and patriotic organ-
izations engaged in Americanization
work, meeting here today, organized
the national American council.

the respective order in which they ad-1
dress the audience. The negative
team, which travels to Urbana, will be
! under the care of Prof. R. D. T. Hol-
lister and consists Of John Bacon, '23,
G RalphJohnson, '23, and Edward
VOSIIOPOLITANv CLUB PRESENTS Ramsdell, '23.
Professor Weaver, of Wisconsin,
- ELABORATE PRODUCTION; will preside in the Michigan debate.
50 IN CAST The debates in both Ann Arbor and
in Urbana will be no-decision debates
Twelve acts, most of them short in and the audience will have the priv-
order to make a snappy program, will ilege of questioning either the affirm-
berested bya a ndy wrormen wl ative or the negative on any points
be presented by men and women of that are not entirely clear at the
the Cosmopolitan club in the "All Na- close of the contest.
tions' Fandango", at 8 o'clock tomor- "The members of the teams have
row evening at Hill auditorium. Ai- worked just as conscientiously as if
most all the nationalities of the club the debate were to be one in which
will be represented upon the plat- a decision was to be given and are
form, when-more than 50 people, some to be especially commended for their
of them members of the faculty, will effort," is the statement of Professor
take part. Hollister, who with Mr. J. H. Hath-
Hawaiian minstels with their uke- away has charge of coaching the stu-
leles and guitars are scheduled to dents who are to debate.
appear, as are also Polish and Egyp-
tian dancers. There will be an Ital- CHIMES ARTICLE

NOMINEES
Nominees for student advisory
committee to be voted on at the
campus elections Wednesday,
March 16, are as follows:
Seniors-four to be elected:
Robert Grindley, '21E,
Robert E. McKean, '21,
Albert C. Jacobs, '21,
James I. McClintock, '21L,(
R. B. Reavill, '22L,
Lee M. Woodruff, '21,
Robert Angell, '21.
Juniors-two to be elected:
D. Dow, '22E (by petition),
Hugh W. Hitchcock, '22,
0. W. Rush, '22,
Walter B. Rea, '22,
R. Emerson Swart, '22E.
C 'est La Guerre
Depicts War As
Pleasant Affair
(By G. P. Overton)
C'est la guerre. It is the war.
But if the war was as pictured in
the Veterans of Foreign Wars' pro-
duction of "C'est la Guerre," giver
last night in Hill auditorium, it is a
crime that the peace conference but-
ted in and spoiled the doughboys' lit-
tle party.
Featuring a variety of incidents,
both humorous and serious, from the
life of members of the A. E. F., the
play sustained the interest of the
audience from the prelude, "The
Americans Come," by a French vet-
eran of 1870, until the exit march of
"Stars and Stripes Forever."
The scene was laid in a French
cafe, and while the chic, petite
mademoiselles from "Gay Paree"
drove away the army blues of the
boys just returned from the trenches
at Chateau Thierry, an old garcon
brought up fresh regiments of bot-
tles to the thirsty warriors. O1d Bill
and company representing the Brit-
ish Tommies, may well be said to have
furnished the best received episode of
the play. The representation of Alan
Seeger in his poem, "I Have a Ren-
dezvous with Death," struck a note of
the serious side of war which found
large response in the audience. Other
high spots on the program were Ox-
ford French, by Percy of the R. A.
F., the Apache Dance, and the dark-
town doughboys in the act of prac-
ticing African golf.
LOCKWOOD GIVES RECITAL ON
SCHUMANN TODAY AT MUSICALE
With a program consisting of a lec-
ture recital on Schumann, Albert Lock-
wood, of the University School of
Music, will give the next number of
the Matinee Musicale at 3:30 o'clock
this afternoon in the assembly hall of
the Union. Among the Schumann
compositions which he will play are:
Toccata, Opus 7; Kreisleriana, Opus
16, Nos. 1 and 6; Carnaval, Opus 9;
and Etudes Symphoniques, Opus 13.

POLLS OPEN AT S
TODA9Y FOR MEN
TO CAST BALLOTS
COUNCIL ANXIOUS FOR STUDENTS
* TO VOTE ON NEW
PLAN
EXCITING R ACE AMONG
CANDIDATES EXPECTED
Some Measure of Opposition Reported
Despite Quite General
Support
Booths will be open at prominent
places on the campus today to re-
ceive the votes of all men students
on the proposed Student Advisory
committee and the men who will com-
pose the committee if it is adopted.
All Should Vote
The committee from the Student
council in charge of the election is
anxious for every man to cast a vote
on the proposition, for, although most
of the individuals interviewed on the

DUNNE WITHDRAWS NAME
R. Jerome Dunne, '22, requests
that his name be withdrawn
from the list of nominees who
are to be voted upon today for
the Student Advisory committee.
Other campus activities make
it inexpedient that he remain
on the list, for if he were elect-
ed, he feels that he would have
too little time to give to the
work.

i

tan solo, an Irish characterization. a
fan dance by the Japanese, and a
Chinese chicken dance. Novelty musicl
will be supplied on the bambool
stick, other musical numbers being
representative Spanish and Filipino
A colonial dance will be given by 16,
University women, eight of whom:
will impersonate men. The French
number on the program will be a
court dance of the time of Lcuis
XTV.
The barefoot gypsy tambourinet
dance by Jeagette Kruzka will be one 3
of the features of the show. Liszt's
"Hungarian Rhapsodie" is the music1
to be used for the dance. Kruzka is4
a former pupil of Alexis Kosloff ofl
the Imperial Russian ballet and of M.I
Portepovitsch, formerly of Pavlowa's
Ballet Russe.4
An adaptation of the ancient and
classical "Chow Chow" dance which
contains in its reminiscences oif a
MQngolian beer trot is the act ina
u hich C. T. [eh, grad., will take ibe1
lead. HiO flappings and crowings in
the interpretation of the Chinese
chicken dance have been heard in Newi
York theaters, where he took similar
parts.

ANALYZES CAMPUSI
Combining a peculiar quality of
satire with an interesting collection of
statistics, "Student Activities: a Crit-
ical Analysis," by J. R. Adams and
O. C. Johnson, of the rhetoric depart-
ment of the University, in the Chimes,
appearing this week, seeks to analyze
the administration of student activi-
ties, with special reference to their
relative usefulness, the number of
students involved, the possibility of
time wasted, and the tendency of most
campus organizations to confine a
large amount of time to social activi-
teis.
Under specific heads the following
organizations and their methods of
administration, their shortcomings
and advantages, will be treated: Ad-
ministration, Educational Phases of
Activities, The Publications, The
Union, and The Daily.
The article will appear in two
parts, part one appearing in the March
number of the Chimes which goes on
sale this week and part two in the
April number.

subject signified their hearty, agree-
ment with the project, members of
the council committee state that there
is evidence of some measure of op-
position. It is said that the addition
of a name to the list of junior nom-
inees will make the race more excit-
ing, inasmuch as only two are to be
selected from ethe list which .numbers
five since the withdrawal of R. Je-
rome Dunne, '22.
"We hope," said Clarence N. John-
ston, '21E, chairman of the committee
in charge of the election, "that every
man will cast his vote on this propo-
sition, which has been claimed by
many to be a decided forward step in
student government. In the event of
its adoption, the constitution will not
have much weight unless it repre-
sents the opinion of a large majority
of the campus."
Votes Counted at 3:30
The booths will be located from 9
o'clock until 3:30 o'clock today in
front of the Library, at the Engineer-
ing arch, at the corner of north Uni-
versity and State streets, and in front
of Alumni Memorial hall. At 3:39
o'clock the ballots will be taken to the
Union, where they will be counted by
members of the Student council.
COOLIDGE TALKS FRIDAY ON
AUSTRIAN PEACE TREATY
Prof. Archibald C. Coolidge, of the
history department of Harvard uni-
versity, will give a lecture on "The
Austrian Peace trreaty" at 4:15
o'clock Friday, afternoon in Natural
Science auditorium.
A man of wide experience, Profes-
sor Coolidge served as secretary of
the American legation at Vienna in
1893, as a delegate to the Pan-Amer-
ican scientific congress, Santiago,
Chile, in 1908, and as exchange pro-
fessor at the University of Berlin in
1914.
BAUMANN, '17E, SPEAKS OF
AEROPLANE INDUSTRY TODAY
Speaking before the Aero club, M.
C. Baumann, '17E, in his lecture on
"The Aeroplane Industry of Today"
told of conditions in the industry to-
day and compared progress along that
line in the United States with the
nri 7es in urofln t tes.~

STUDENT ADVISORY
The constitution of the Student Advisory committee, as cor-
rected and proposed is as follows:
Article 1. The name of the committee shall be the Student
Advisory committee.
Article 2. The purpose of the committee shall be to voice
sentiment of the student body to the Dean of Students, to dis-
cuss with him matters pertaining to general policies of student
conduct, to submit recommendations on such matters to the
Dean of Students, and actively to assist the proper University
authorities in the enforcement of all rules pertaining to student
conduct.
Article 3. The committee shall be composed of four (4)
seniors and tio (2) juniors. The president of the Michigan
Union, the president of the Student council, and the managing
editor of The Michigan Daily shall be ex-officio members of the
committee.
Article 4. The officers of the Student council shall consti-
tute the nominating body for the committee and shall nominate
four (4) sophomores and four (4) juniors one week prior to the
spring All-campus election, at which election two (2) of those
nominated from each class shall be elected to the committee, the
sophomores to hold office for two (2) years and the juniors for
one (1) year.
!Cnn~ivi A Aviv tnvl.,. . n dnv---------- a ru+ r~

COMMITTEE CONSTITUTION
signed by two hundred (200) students of the University may
have his name placed on the ballot.
Section B. In case of vacancies other than by expiration of
office the nominating body for the committee and remaining
members of the committee shall have jointly the power to fill
the vacancy.
Section C. Any vacancy created by an elected member be-
coming an ex-officio member shall be filled as provided in sec-
tion B of this article.
Section D. The officers of the committee shall be a chair-
man, a senior who shall not be an ex-officio member of the com-
mittee, and a secretary, who shall be elected by the members of
the committee.
Article 5. The committee shall meet with the Dean of Stu-
dents at least twice a month.
Article 6. In the event of any disagreement between the
committee and the Committee on Student Affairs the committee
by seven-ninths vote of its members shall have the power to
appear before the President and deans of the University.
Article 7. Amendments may be proposed by the committee
or by a petition signed by five hundred (500) male students
and placed on the ballot. Any duly authorized amendment may
be ratified by a two-thirds majority of the total ballots cast by

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