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March 13, 1921 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-13

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SUPPLEMENT
FEATURES
THEATRES
MUSIC
LITERARY

SUNDAY

FEATURE

SECTION

F t il FCl

SECTION
TWO

I

VOL. XIIL NO. 111

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 1921

PRICE FIVE C

JOE'S

PLACE

GO NE

FORE VEI

Commerce Seizes
Famous Landmark
CAXTIR TABLE TOPS TO BE PRESERVED IN ME YORY OF DAYS
GONE' BY, IS WISH OF OWNER WHO IS ILL
AND IN HOSPITAL
(By Leo Hershdorfer)
AN ELEGY
Ring loud the funeral-bell, oh ye who were once merry, and
sound the exequial dirge, all ye who dared to permit joy a place in
your hearts. Prepare' ye all to shed tears, for it has come to pa'ss
that a great calamity has befallen us.
Greater even than the war of nations, more disastrous than the
postal service, there has occurred an event which must be received
with mourning and fasting. O, sad indeed that it should pass out of
our lives forever-but it was so ordained by Fate.'
For Joe Parker's Catalpa Inn-where Michigan knights in former
years gathered about the Round Table-has been sold. Requiescat in
,paco,
Like a thunderbolt from the sky, my steps in the direction of the hos-
the sudden news/that the old Catalpa telry. But as I drew near the little
Inn-the famous student rendezvous- inn, the air seemed to grow colder
had been purchased by the Ann Arbor and the light drizzle which had been
Chamber of Commerce spread about hiding the sun all that day had turned
the campus. It was as if a personal into a heavy downpour. And then it

friend had 'gone out of the life of
every alumnus, every student who re-
members even the last days in '16,
before local option went into effect.
It seemed' incredible, unbelievable;
that the tale was true, and it was with
the one hope that we might receive
from the lips of Joe Parker himself
denial of the rumor, that I hastily bent
Chimes To Offer
fore Writing y
Famous Graduates

dawned upon me that these were
signs-signs indicative of the truth.

It Is True

I

Next Issue Will Contain Article.
Hfarrisen B. McGraw, '91, Lead-
ing Corporation Lawyer

byI

Climaxing a period of deevlopment,
Chimes this month will present to the
Michigan! campus, what its editors
believe to be the perfection of alumni.
sentiment expressed to the student
body.
Featured in the forthcoming issue
are articles written by famous gradu-
ates of the University exclusively for
campus publication.
Dean Bates Writer
Foremost among them is the article
on "The Law" by Dean Bates of the
Law School continuing the series of
articles on the different colleges.
Harrison B. McGraw, '91, one of. the
leading corporation lawyers of Amer-
ica, gives some interesting data on
the trials of the law apprentice in his
"After Thirty Years." Donald Hamil-
ton Haines, whose short stries have
appeared so often recently in the
"Outlook" has writte . another e-
perience in "The Adventures of Theo-
philee" entitled "Comrades of the
Tent" "Student Activities: A Criti-
cal Analysis" may startle a good por-
tion of the campus by its frankness
as it did the "Acolyte." The criticism
is written by two members of the,
faculty, J. R. Adams and 0. C. John-
Early In the year the board of edi-
tors of the Chimes conceived the idea
of developing a line of communica-
tion between the alumni, the faculty,
and the student. They thought Chimes
might be made more than a cursory
bearer of campus opinions-that it
might offer real literature to the stu-
dent body.
'Worthy Opinions
Not the literary offerings of hopeful
offsprings of freshman rhetoric-
(Continued on Page Four) ,

I entered, and was met by a young
woman, to whom I confided my mis-
sion.
"I'm afraid it's true," she told me.
Alas and alack! my last hopes de-
stroyed, the fears which I had been
battling against confirmed, and an-
other institution had been lost to the
cause of tradition!
I inquired after Joe, Wut the oblig-
ing young woman answered that
"Dad" was confined to the hospital
for several weeks, but that she would
be glad to show me through the place.
Sweeter words than these never es-
caped mortal lips.
My fair guide, whom I now knew
to be Miss Parker, led me into the
great meeting room, the room which
had served as a rendezvous for Mich-
igan men of old, where class and
honor had been forgotten in that
grand spirit of brotherhood and good-
fellowship which has ever character-
ized students of the Maize and Blue.
Tables Are Tribute
Here and there about the room were
small, round tables, surrounded by
chairs which had been empty since
19116, standing as a mute tribute to
the great men of years-long past. I
could picture, as I gazed at this won-
derful sight-the tables, the antique
cane chairs, the old table-tops with
innumerable names, initials, and foot-
ball scores carved in them-the room
filled with laughing, happy men, re-
counting merry tales and singing
jolly songs. Songs of victory they
were, for it was then that "Michigan
ruled the West."
In a hazy mist, I seined to see
again Heston and Craig and Schultz
and Maulbetsch seated at one table,
at another table the Hammond broth.
ers-Tom and Harry,-Norcross and
Redden, and about them men joining
in praises of these immemorable
heroes, while an invisible band played
"The Victors." I
With a slight shudde rof realization
that it was all a vision, a joyous illu-
sion which had passed all too quickly,
I turned to my hostess and asked her
what disposition was to be made of
the old relics-the priceless table-
tops, the cherished trophies, and the
framed placards which freshmen and
sophomores had printed, according to
custom in the good old days, on the
Black Friday preceding the tradi-
(Continued on Page Four)

IPROPORTIONS PLACE
MICHIGAN IN SECOND
Kansas leads in the number of
students in their own state uni-
versity in proportion to the
population of the state.
For every 10,000 inhabitants
in the state, there are the fol-
lowing number of 'students in l
the respective state universities:
Kansas 27, Mchigan 24, Iowa 21,
Nebraska 21, Wisconsin 19, Indi-
ana 15, Oklahoma 10, Illinois 8,,
and Missouri 8.
Ii I
Shuter Converts
Clumsy .1i!en Into
Chic Little Miaids1
Awkward Males Fool Even Each
Other as They Prepare for 1921
Michigan Union Opera
(By M. B. Stahl)
Heel, toe, heel, toe,-kick!
Qne, two, three, four-hop!
Get your hoof in place! Noises of
every variety, activities of every kind,
costumes or absence of them, upright
scenery and prostrate settings, con-
stitute in the melee in the workshop
from which Director E. Mortimer
Shuter, cigar in mouth, brings order
out of chaos, and blends all into the
harmony of the Union opera.
By no means the least of the prob-
lems to be solved for "Top o' th'
Mornin' is to transform 24 real
masculine Michigan men into the
daintiest of effeminate creatures. It's
sometimes hard to convince those
carrying men parts that others are
attempting to play women and the
irate director has to bellow "Smile at
that girl. Don't look like you want
to crack her on the head. You aren't
trying out for the army?'
Easy For Some
Women's roles/are admittedly easy
for some, but others have no concep-
tion of how to execute female charms.
Many there are whose faces are seen
at the first rehearsals but who never
show up again. How to carry the
hands while walking, how to place
the arms in more graceful positions,
how to hold out the dresses, and the
stage curtseys, are some of the intri-
cacies of the stage which drive the
men almost to desperation in their
attempt at mastery.
Unsophisticated new opera men
have blushed more than once upon en-
tering the workshop and seeing girls
walking around with cigarettes in
their mouths, or playing cards in the
corner while waiting for their "cue."
The mistake is discovered, however,
when it is learned that the girls are
males of the girls' chorus.
"I'm going to work the surplus fat
off you," says the director when the
men get lax, and forget their cues
when the card game gets too .inter-
esting. Immediately there is a scurry-
ing, the men get to their feet and into
their parts.
Follow Leader!
Gracefulness is not the intuitive
ability of the novice when he makes
his'first debut at an opera rehearsal.
If there are anumber of new men in
dancing pumps and old trousers, with
shirts off, and sweating, there is
usually a great deal of bumping in
getting througl the steps, or in flop-
ping down on the knees.

"Get in step. Watch the man in
the lead," is the cry of the director,
when some go one way and others
another.

'UPPER LEFT HAND CORNER, ELSIE B. SMITH; UPPER RIGHT HAND
CORNER, EVELYN F. ROCKWELL; LOWER LEFT HAND CORNER,
CHRISTINE MURKETT, AND LOWER RIGHT HAND CORNER, MII
DRED CHASE, WHO WILL TAKE LEADING PARTS IN THE JUpIOR
GIRLS' PLAY. CENTER, EDNA GROFF, GENERAL CHAIRMAN OF
THE PLAY COMMITTEE.'

~!Ill11111111111111IiI 11111111111 111111111II 11 1111 111111 III 11111111111 I l lhlIllH III 111111 IPi
-Luminaries Who Will Scintillate Mid
Galaxy of Stars in Junior Girls' Play
7llllllllll i illllllllllll10111 1111111I I 1111N I ilg llHA illltlllpll

"Selina Sue" is the name/ chosen'
for this year's Junior Girls' play
which will be given on March 18 and
19 at the Whitney theater. Twenty-
two speaking parts will be played by
the following girls:
Evelyn Rockwell, Mildred Chase,
Edith Staebler, Christine Murkett,
Elise Smith, Joyce McCurdy, Florence
Freeman, Ruth Goodhew, Margaret
Moye, Elizabeth Vickery, Amy Loomis,
Mildred Trick, Ruth Mills, Olive Lock-
wood, Isabel Kemp, Helen Feetham,

Smgh Thinks
We 're Poite;
LikesA meric
EAST INDIAN RECOUNTS FIL
IMPRESSIONS TO
REPORTER
(By W. W. Ottaway)
I had often seen Mr. Smgh on
campus in his Indiai robe and uri
and wondered why he had chosen
University of Michigan at which
study. And when I Ierned fr
Prof. Henry E. Riggs, of the civil
gineering department, that he lvaL
graduate of one' of India's* geat
universities and a man of no mi
learning, I was even more interes
to hear from his own lips why he
come to Ann Arbor and what
thought of America as far- as he b
seen it.
Consequently I entered the draft
shop on Liberty street one afternc
some time ago where Mr. Smgh spe
a good share of his time bent on
interview. He received me cordia
and I was surprised at the flue
with which he spoke our language
Recalls First Thoughts
"Remembering when I first thoui
of coming to America," he began,
answer to my first question, "my m
travels back to the rugged mount
of Kermansha, a town of Persia, wh
on one extiemely cold night inI
cember of 1918 I lay under a pile
blankets in an Arab tent reading
English author's fanciful impressi
of the East and West.
"I could not help but criticize
author's descriptions and her se
of fairness to those who live in
ferent environments and are sw
by equally different traditions ;
standards of the good and beauti
Not only was the much abused E
the victim of her dislike but
seemed to extend it even to the
recognized great nations of the i
world.
"Notwithstanding the author's
luctance to give credit to anyt
not like her own country I could
through the screen of her prejui
glimpses of grandeur of tJ6s iro
ful country. The book I was reac
professed agreement with the Eng
poet who said that the East and
West ;can never meet and thus m
me sceptical for the time about t
divine harmony which I think
meates through all diversity
keeps all hearts attached in some
or other like the string of a 'JoE
passing through pearls secured f:
various parts of the universe.
before I altogether succumbed to
pessimistic view my hopes urged
to see the lands of the author and j
as well as this subject, East and,
Met MIchigan Head
"And so," he concluded, "I enee:
the idea of coming to America
came to know of an American geri
man who is a graduate of this1
versity and who informed me of
the possibilities and opporti
available in this country. No6
had I expressed my desire for an
cation here than this gentleman w
letters to his friends here e
me. I was introduced, by letter
course, to Professor Henry E. RI
whose hopeful communicat
smoothed away all the little bIt
which were sometimes almost enc
- to dissuade me from my enterpri
"And how do you like the U
- States and this University?" b-
in, anxious to hear his views -

x "Professors whom I have met he
- said Mr.- Smgh, "have treated me -
kindly and students in general I
- shown me all the politeness a fore
(Continued on Page Two)

Ada Nutten, Katherine '-ealy, garion
Ackerman, Margaret Schnaple, Elsie
Townsend, and Thekla Roese.
The choruses which consist of ap-
proximately one hundred Juniors in-
clude the following:
Murza Mann, Roma Hooper, Esther
Nyland, Helen Chambers, 'Frances
Averill, Edna Doughty, Arline Her-
nam, Barbara Wagner, Hilda Wester.
Florence Derrick, Edelaine Roden,
Marion True, Lenore Dinius, Dora
(Continued on Page Four)

)Ylore Than 400 Combine
iLearning And Earning
Positions as Assistant Instructors, Librarians, Clerks, Stenographers and

Administrative Aids Filled
Distributed Over

by Knowledge Seekers;
Entire Campus

(By William W. Ottaway)
Combining earning with learning
407 students in the University of Mich-
igan are at the present time working
as teacher assistants, laboratory as-
sistants, clerks, and stenograplhers.
They are regular employees of th4
University administration listed as
part time cleiko, and draw substan-
tial salaries to aid them in gaining
a college education.
Of the total number of employees
by far the grea'ter number are assis-
tants in the chemistry departinent
where they do part time work as
filling table assistants, laboratory as-
sistants, teacher assistants, and lec-
ture assistants. The present number
is set at 95.

dent assistants are employed. Of the
colleges of the University the literary
college employs the largest number
of students, 131 being the present
number. The engineering college is
next with a list of 85, while the rank
of the remaining colleges is as fol-
lows: medical 20, law 3, pharmacy 2,
dental 2.;
Seventeen students are employed on
the literary administration, 4 in the
astronomy department, 11 in the
botany department, 13 in the econom-
ics department, 6 in the education
department, 1 in; the English depart-
ment, 3 in the fine arts department,
9 in the forestry department, 10 in
the geology department, 8 in the his-
tory department, 5 in the mathematics
department, 9 in the philosophy de-
(Continued on Page Four)

1*

Library Employs 38
In the University library

38

stu-

htU1111t11111thh111th1~thlthlttlt1111111thHh~h 111

TICKETS

Junior

Girls'

Play

miat..

"Selind Sue"

IIhhIhIhIIhhIhIIhh~IIhllflillIflhlIlt
SHOWS
Friday and Saturds
Evenings
PRICES
2.00,1.50;1.00
Matinee on Saturdi
Prices 1.50,100

GRAHAM'S

WHITNEY THEATRE March 18th and 19th
(This Space donated By Graham's Book Store)

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