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March 12, 1921 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

t I i

IAlLYOFFICIAL BULLETIN

meI

SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1921.

Number 110.

lenate Council:
The meeting of the Senate Council scheduled for Monday, March 14,
>een postponed indefinitely.
R. W. BUNTING, Secretary.
T'o Members of the Literary Faculty:
The Faculty Directory blanks for the College of Literature, Science and
he Arts will be found in, the tops of the messenger boxes or in the com-
partments belonging to members of the faculty of this College. These blanks
are separate and distinct from any issued by the President's office, and
hould be filled out and returned to Dean Effinger's office not later than
Monday, March 14, directly or through the messenger service.
JOHN. R. EFFINGER.
Students in Economics 15 and 37:
Students in the above courses who were absent at the final examina-
ion and are entitled to take the make-up examination will present them-
selves in Room 102, Economics building, next Saturday morning, March 19,
921, at 9 o'clock. I. L. SHARFMAN.
Mental Examination Results:
Non-probation students who participatd in the mental tests adminis-
ered by the Bureau of Tests and Measurements may learn their standing
n these tests by calling at Room 105,- Tappan hall, Monday, March 14, 9-12,
or 1-5; or Tuesday, March 15, 10-12, or 1-4.
GUY M. WHIPPLE.
Supplementary Examination in Zoology I:
A supplementary examination for those who were absent from the ex-
amination in Zoology I in the first semester will be given Saturday, March
L2, at 9 a. m., in Room Z-231, Natural Science.
A. FRANKLIN SHULL.
Men's Educational Club:
The program for the next meeting of the Educational Club will con-
sist of reports of the recent Atlantic City Convention of the N. E. A. by
Professors A. S. Whitney, Guy M. Whipple, and J. B. Edmonson. Attention
is called to the fact that the meeting will be held Monday evening, March
14, at 7 o'clock in Room 304, Michigan Union, instead of Wednesday even-
ing. All men interested in education are invited.
CLAIR K. SEARLES.
Sociology:
8 o'clock quiz section in Sociology 30 will meet in Room 205 Tappan
hall. A. E. WOOD.

ADDI1TIONAL SPORT S
INTRAMURAL MEET
TH IS AFTERNOON
All eligibility rules for intramural
competition have been suspended for
the interclass track meet which is to
be at 2:15 o'clock this afternoon with
the exception of the statute prohibit-
ing winners of "M's" and "AMA's"
from taking part. This means that
men on probation and others who
would be barred under the usual rules
will be allowed to compete. All pro-
tests which it may be desired to en-
ter relative to the competition of any
nman must -be made -before the meet
takeg place. Intramural Manager H.
E. Storz and Assistant Intramural Di-
rector Fred Fletcher have been ap-
pointed as eligibilty officials and will
decide all protests.
A man who has entered as a fresh-
man at Michigan may compete with
the class with which he enters, but a
man who is a transfer from another
institution must compete for the
class to which his number of hours
of credit assigns him. For example,
24 hours of credit in the Lit college
give sophomore standing. All men,
therefore, who are transfers or who
have dropped out of school and re-
turned are requested to bring with
them a written statement of their
standing. Men who have not won an
"M" or an "AMA", but who are on the
track squad and are not mentioned on
Coach Farrell's list of eligible men
are barred from taking, part.
All events will be run off as quick-
ly as possible, and an attempt will be
made to so arrange the program that
men may take part in more than one
event up to the limit of three which
has been set by the Intramural de-
partment.
BILLIARD TOURNEY
AT UNION ADVANCES

VETERANS PLAN TRUE PICTURE
OF SOLDIER LIFE "OVER THERE"
(Continued from Page One)
with the parts they are- to take. Real
American girls will play the part1
of the mademoiselles. One of the
feaures of the production will be thec
"Blighty Quartette."c
It is the intention of the cast to
give a presentation of coniditions as,
they were "over there," without ex-
aggeration and yet with all the orig-a
inal atmosphere retained. The time
of the play is set while the war was1
still. in progress and will give a view1
of the war to those who did not get;
the chance to see it first hand, and ato
the same time will recall many famil-1
iar incidents and scenes to the men
who went across.
Tickets for the production were on
sale on the campus yesterday. The
men in charge of the sale expressed
entire satisfaction last night at the
number of tickets disposed of during
the day.
Calder Bill Minority Report Made
Senator Edward J. Gay, of Louisi-
ana, a member of the committee on
reconstruction and production, sub-
mitted a minority report to the sen-
ate of that committee on the Calder
coal bill. The Calder bill provides for
government control of the coal indus-
tries of the country.
The report charges that the ma-
jority recommendation from the
committee was made without suffi-
cient investigation and that such ac-
tion would open the way for Federal-
ization of all private enterprises.
Moreover, according to investigations
made by Senator Gay, the recent coal
troubles were caused more by inade-
quate transnortation facilities than by
mismanagement of the coal business.

OPINION FAVORS
ADVISORY SYSTEM

(Continued from Page One)
votes polled next Wednesday should
represent a large portion of the stu-
dents," said O. W. Rush, '22, presidentt
of the junior lits.
Students Must Understand
"The constitution of the proposed
committee," said J. Douglas Dow,
president of the junior engineers, "al-
lows for considerable dependence on
the members chosen, and one of the
best assurances for the success of thej
project will be an accurate under-
standing on the part of the student;
body as to what it all means. By every
man voting next Wednesday it will be
evident that the plan is heartily back-
ed -by the students."
C. N. Johnston, '21E, president of the
senior engineers, said that he thought,
the project to be a most worthy one,
deserving of recognition by the entire
campus, and of such immediate im-
portance that every man should reg-
ister his vote next week. C. Maurice
Atkinson, '22, business manager of
Chimes, and Lester E. Waterbury,
'21L, managing editor of Chimes, were
strong in their praises of the plan,
believing that it will go far towards
improving conditions and putting stu-
dent government on a strong work-
ing basiss
MASONIC NOTICE
All Masons on the campus are in-
vited to attend the- meeting of theI
Craftsmen's Club this evening at the
Masonic Temple. The third degree
will be conferred at 7:30 P. M. Final
arrangements will be made for the
Detroit trip.-Adv.
SPECIAL 90c Chicken Dinner,- Sun-
day, 12 to 2 p. m., Chinese Gardens.-
Adv.

UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE
TREATS 119 STUDENTS DAILY
During the last school year each
student received approximately $3.50
worth of service and medicine from
the University Health service, accord-
ing to statistics available yesterday.
These statistics were computed on the
basis of the per thousand students in
attendance at the regular session.
Each student averaged more than
two calls during the year at the dis-
pensary which attended to approxi-
mately 119 calls daily. During the
year but 201 room calls were made
and the hospital patients spent about
10 lays in confinement on the aver-
age. The general good health of the
student body was attended by the low
death total of 11.
NEBRASKA PLACES IN WESTERN
WRESTLING MEET AT INDIANA
(By Associated Press)
Bloomington, Ind., March 11.-Ne-
braska university wrestling team se-
cured the edge on third place in the
Western college intercollegiate wrestl-
ing meet here this afternoon by win-
ning six points in the contest for that
place. Ohio State, Iowa, Wisconsin,
and Illinois each received one point in
the third contest. The final for first
and second places in the meet were
staged tonight.
Directories for New Students
For the convenience. of students en-
tering the University this semester,
Frederick J. Pfluke, '21E, business
manager, announces that there will
be a few copies of the 1921 Students'
Directory available at the Directory
office in the Press building.

0

ATTENTION- ENGINEERS and ARCHITECTS!!
RUST'S LETTERING SCALE
A "Slide Rule" to Lettering Price $1.25

WHAT'S GOING ON
SATURDAY
1:00-Officers of the Student council
meet to select nominees for the
student advisory committees.
1:30- Union orchestra rehearsal to
work on opera music, Union.
2:00-Tryouts for the Varsity Glee
club in room 308, Union.
7:00-Upper Room Bible class meets
in the ups r roiom in Lane hall.
7 :&-Newark club meets in room 304,
Union. Carl Baccaro, '21D, speaks.
7:30-Craftsmen club meets, Masonic
temple.
7:30-Bishop Williams speaks at the
second Good Fellowship meeting on
"Recent Impressions of England,"
Harris hall.
SUNDAY
9:30-University Men's Bible class
meets in the upper room in Lane
hall.
3:30-Edmond C. Shields, '96L, speaks
on "The Man Out of College," Un-
ion.
4:30-Student Volunteers meet, Lane
hall.
6:00-. A. Bursley, Dean of Students,
speaks at the second Sunday even-
ing supper for students, Harris hall.
6:00-The Wesleyan guild meets for
social half hour and special guild
meeting, Methodist church.
7:30-William L. Stidger, of Detroit,
speaks on "Oriental Flashlights," at
First Methodist church .
7:30-Dr. Clarence A. Barbour, pres-
ident of Rochester Theological Sem-
inary, speaks on "The Land of the
Discovered," Baptist church.
U-NOTICES
A meeting of all Culver men will be
held at 5:15 o'clock Monday in room
302, Union.'
The Ferris Institute club banquet
tickets are now on sale at the Un-
ion and at Sugden's drug store.
NEW PUBLICATION OF NEWARK
CLUB WILL APPEAR TONIGHT
. "The Mosquito," official publication
of the Newark club, will make its first
appearance at a special meeting of the
organization at 7:30 o'clock tonight in
room 304 of the Union.
This initial issue of the paper will
be dedicated to the alumni of the class
of 1915, founders of the Michigan
chapter of the club. The publication,
which will carry stories of campus
and international news, a special col-
umn devoted to athletic news and fea-
ture stories, will be published semi-
monthly.
An address on the subject of alum-
ni activities will be given by Herman
Kerber, '19, and Carl Baccaro, '21D,
will talk on "Michigan Men in the

MISS GREENWOOD
TO TOUR ENGLAND
The board of governors of Martha
Cookbuilding has granted Miss Grace
Greenwood, social director of Martha
Cook building, a three months' leave
of absence beginning April 1.
Most of Miss Greenwood's time will
be spent in England visiting Oxford,
Cambridge, Stratford, Birmingham,
and many towns in the rural districts.
She hopes to spend the month of May
in Paris. Through friends of Colle-$
giate alumnae she will be entertained
by groups of women in England. Miss
Greenwood will sail from New York
city April 28, on the Imperator and
will land at South Hampton May 5.
Miss Greenwood has been in the ad-
ministration work for 15 years, 11 of
which were spent at Columbia univer-
sity before coming to Ann Arbor.
SOPHOMORE PROM TAKES PLACE
AS MARKED SOCIAL SUCCESS
(Continued from Page One)
which were made and for the man-
ner in which the Prom was handled
generally. The cancelling of the J-
Hop this year gave the class of 1923
an opportunity to distinguish itself in
social affairs, such an opportunity as
may not present itself again, and the
manner in which the class took ad-
vantage of the chance thus offered,
was most commendable.
L. Perkins Bull was chairman of
the committee with as his assistants,
Donald C. Turner, Alfred R. Naser,
Russell G. Alexander, Helen Partlow,
Marion Koch, Frederick S. Randall,
Venner E. Brace, James Hume, Virgil
S. Tilly, Seward Kramer, Leland W.
Kirkpatrick, G. W. Johnson Jr.
PROF. FRAYER COMPARES 1920
WITH CONDITIONS IN 1820
(Continued from Page One)
"The League of Nations, as stu-
dents of history know, is not a new
thing. Alexander I of Russia was in-
terested in such a project long ago.
A Confederations of Nations was
formed in Europe in 1824 which failed
only on account of an embittered Eng-
lish populace," said Professor Frayer.
Professor Frayer closed his address
with a plea for co-operation between
all groups, stating that the soundest
economic doctrine is one which ~e-
mands an economic equilibrium.
Following the speech a general dis-
cussion took place. The Intercol-
legiate Socialist society meets every
other Friday, and an attempt is made
to secure a prominent speaker for the
occasion.
Ue the advertising columns of The
Michigan Daily to reach the best of
Ann Arbor's buyers.-Adv.
Use Classified advertising and sell
rour miscellaneous articles.-Adv.

Taylor Dickering with Famous Cue
Artists for Exhibition Matches
Play in the class B Union billiard
tourney since Monday has resulted as
follows: Griffith def. Bumpus, 20-17;
Griffith def. Loeb, 20-16; Byrne def.
Moeller, 20-11; Bronson def. Froun-
felker, 20-11; Griffith def. Karpus, 20-
17; Frounfelker def. Kelly, 20-19; Kar-
pus def. Loeb, 20-17. This afternoon
at 4:30 o'clock Kelly will play Bron-
son, and tonight at 8 o'clock Froun-
felker and Karpus will meet. -Satur-
day afternoon Byrne takes the cue
against Bumpus, and in the evening
Moeller and Loeb oppose each other
over the green cloth.
Al Taylor is dickering with several
noted cut artists in the endeavor to
bring them to the Union for exhibi-
tions. Among them is Johnny Layton,
world's professional three cushion
champion. There is also a possibil-
ity of an exhibition match between
Horeman and Cochrane. Al is con-
tinuing his tri-weekly talks to bil-
liard enthusiasts.
GLASGOW AND OGDEN WIN
HANDBALL DOUBLES TITLE
(Continued from Page Three)
turning point came in the third game
when Glasgow and Ogden with the
score 20 to 16 against them came from
behind and tied the count at 20 all.
After winning this game in the next
inning they were never headed in the
two remaining games. Each member
of the wining team will receive a sil-
ver cup emblematic of the champion-
ship. In the singles Clark took two
straight matches from Houser 21-20,
21-20. Clark meets Brucker in the
semi-finals this afternoon and the
winner will play Sanchez Monday for
the singles championship.
WESBROOK AND WALKER BREAK
MICHIGAN AGGIE GYM RECORDS
(Continued from Page One)
The surprise of the evening was the
failure of the Michigan sprinters to
place in the 40 yard dash. Simmons
qualified but did not place in the fin-
als. Kelly, handicapped by a sore
leg, did not qualify. Losch, who is
suffering at present with an injured
leg, did not make the trip. Ernst of
M. A. C. won this event in 4 3-5 sec-
onds.
Ann Arbor high school was repre-
sented at the meet by Peel, who won
the 40 yard high hurdles in the high
school class, time not received. The
Kalamazoo half mile relay team beat
the Aggies in the other feature event
of the meet. Practically all of the
colleges and larger high schools of the
state were represented at the East
[Lansing meet.
Are you going to have a party? Let
Teet's Dining Rooms serve the dinner.
-Adv.

W

A

H

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BUNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

I!~~~~~~- 04.~ - - - .- -.--~

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