100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 09, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



THE WEATHER ASSOCIATED
, 741) tPRESS
RAIN TURNING TO SNOW;S ii an&d__
gAN UREAH DAY AND NGHT WIRE
COLDER TODAY ItSERVICE
VOL.. XXXI No. 107. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 192. PRICE FIVE CEN'

w

"BUNTY" READY-
AFTER SIX WEEKS
%OF PREPARATION
FINAL DRESS REHEARSAL COM-
PLETED YESTERDAY AFT-
ERNOON
PLAY TO BE PRODUCED
AT WHITNEY TONIGHT
Prof. Nelson, Director of Production,
is Well Pleased With
Actors
Comedy club after six weeks of
preparation will present Graham
Moffat's Scotch comedy, 'Bunty Pulls
the Strings," at 8 o'clock tonight at
the Whitney theater.
Dres's rehearsal was held yesterday
afternoon pnd Prof. J. Raleigh Nel-
son, the director of the play, stated
that he is well pleased with the work
of the cast, the costumes, and the
settings. Special interest is attached
to the play as its appearance tonight
will mark the thirty-sixth year of the
club as a producing organization and
also on account of the favorable re-
port of last year's production, "Alice-
Sit-By-the-Fre," by the chairman of
the Committee on Student Affairs in
his annual report to the University
Senate, in which he compared the
Comedy club production favorably
with both the Union opera and the
Junior Girls' play.
Bunty, about whom the action cen-
ters, will be played by Frances Maire,
'21. John Hassberger; '23, will take
the part of Rab, her brother, while
Tammas Biggar, her father, will be
portrayed by Richard Forsyth, '22L,
and Clement Smith, '23, will take the
role of Wellem' Sprunt, Bunty's lover.
Others having leading parts are: Car-
rie Smith, '21, Camilla Hayden, '21,
and Carrie Fairchild, '21.
Former members of the Comedy
club who have since made a name for
themselves in dramatics are: Phyllis
Povah, who was in the New York pro-
duction of Abraham Linoln; Norman
Hackett, the distinguished actor; and
Louise Van Vorhies Armstrong, who
has written many pageants and plays.
The play will be presented in Port
Huron March 16 under the auspices
of the Michigan alumni of that city.
This is the first out of town appear-
ance the club has made in seven
years, when it presented Percy Mac-
Kaye's "Scarecrow" in Port Huron.
Ancient Chinese
Codes Discussed
In Law Review
Based on hitherto untranslated ma-
terial, written centuries before Christ,
an article entitled "Readings from
Ancient Chinese Codes and Other
Sources of Chinese Law and Legal
Ideas" by John Wu, grad., features
the March number of the Law Review,
which came out yesterday. The article
explains many interesting facts about
the ancient Chinese legal system, ef-
forts to abolish the use of torture in
trials, various methods used in pun-
ishment, and many other phases of
the law of ancient times.
An article on the "Respective Rights
of Preferred and Common Stockhold-
ers in Surplus Profits" by George Jar-
vis Thompson of the law department

of the University of Pittsburgh and
George F.- Goodrich's discussion,
"Does the Constitution Protect Free
Speech," constitute the remaining part
of the magazine with the exception
of the regular departments of "Re-'
cent Important Decisions" and "Note
and Comment."
The issue concludes with a review'
of Robert M. Hughes' "Handbook of
Admiralty Law" by G. L. Canfield.

HONOR SYSTEM MEETS WITH MUCH APPROTAL

PLAN IS CONDEMNED BY ONLY
TWO LITERARY
PROFS.
Favorable reports have been turned
in by a majority of the members of the
literary faculty who conducted exam-
inations under .the honor system, ac-
cording to Robert C. Angell, '21, chair-
man of the senior honor committee.
Of the questionnaires sent out by
the committee some 20 have been re-1
turned, in all but two of which the
instructors declared that they believ-
ed the trial had proved successful.
MISSOURI MAY CHALLENE,
CONFERENCECHAMPIONS
(By Associated Press)+
Chicago, March 8. - The Univer-
sity of Missouri basketball team, win-
ner of the Missouri Valley Conference
championship, probably will challenge
one of the teams tied for the Western
Conference title for a post season se-
ries of games, it was announced here
tonight.
The Missouri five is regarded as one
of the strongest teams ever develop-
ed in the Valley Conference.
A post series of basketball games
between the University of Missouri
and one of the teams tied for the
lead in the Big Ten would be rather
improbable, according to a statement
issued by P. G. Bartelme, athletic di-
rector at the University of Michigan.
The Conference authorities are in-
clined to frown upon such series, and
the fact that there is no one clearly
determined champion in the Big Ten
this season would lead to a compli-
cation of claims of the teams in the
Conference to the right to play in
such a series.
Ohio State found it difficult to ob-
tain permission to play California in
a post season football game, and the
Big Ten directors would be inclined
to be rather strict, since the permis-
sion has been granted once this year.
BOXING BOUT FOR
'22 LIT SMOKER
Through the courtesy of the Univer-
sity Boxing club a fast four-round
heavyweight boxing bout has been
,scheduled for the junior lit smoker
which will be held at 7:30 o'clock
Thursday night at the Union. Clar-
ence Pipp, '23, will meet Ferris, '21L,
each man weighing in at 175 pounds.
Ted Sullivan, the University boxing
instructor, will referee the bout.
It is said that Pipp is the only sold-
ier who outpointed Bob Martin, the A.
E. F. champion, and Ferris is claimed
to be one of the best boxers the Navy
had. Addresses, smokes, music,
punch, and cookies will complete the
evening's entertainment.
Tickets may be procured at either
of the Graham bookstores. Commit-
teemen will also sell them, or they
may be bought at the door.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
TO GIVE.RECITAL
Advanced students of the voice,
piano, and violin departments of the
University School of Music will give
a public recital at 4:15 o'clock this
afternoon in the School of Music
hall.

-The program will include a selec-
tion from Chopin by Gertrude Flower-
day, two salt water ballads by Thom-
as E. Dewey, and a Legende in G
minor by D. Hartley Sinclair. Others
on the program are Mary Louise
Maxwell, Samuel Robinson, Wilma
Demuth, Mrs. Stiles Smith and Max
Ewing.

The two who expressed mistrust of
the system did not hold final exam-
inations under the honor system re-
cently but condemned it on general
grounds.
The majority of those who return-
ed questionnaires were of the opin-
ion that the system should be extend-
ed very gradually. A summary of the
views contained in the questionnaires
will be forwarded to the deans' ad-
visory committee with a recommenda-
tion for gradual extension of the sys-
tem during the present semester. It
is the intention of the committee,
however, to proceed slowly in order
to insure the proper introduction of
the honor system.
No complaints of violations of hon-
or have been received by the senior
honor committee either from stu-
dents or members of the faculty. It
is hoped, however, that with this suc-
cessful trial as a foundation the sys-
tem may be gradually expanded in the
next year or two to include the whole
literary college.
MARSHALL TO TALL
HERE THURSDAY
Said to Be Most Popular Man Who
Ever Presided Over
U. S. Senate
"NATIONAL TENDENCIES" TO
BE TOPIC OF HIS SPEECH
Thomas R. Marshall, who speaks on
"National Tendencies" here Thursday
night on the Oratorical association
program, is the most popular man who
has ever presided over the senate of
the United States, according to the
statement of a Republican leader.
"In presiding over the senate and
in the discharge of the numerous du-
ties incumbent upon his office, he has
endeared himself to all by his unfail-
ing courtesy and pronounced simplic-
ity," said the Affiliated Lyceum and
Chautauqua bureaus. "Mr. Marshall
is a man of the people. He is a man
of force and earnest conviction, a
fearless speaker who is gifted with
unusual oratorical ability. He has a
firm grasp on all of the big national
and international problems of the day
and he discusses them with a sin-
cerity that rings true.

PURDUE 81GERS
AND WOLVERINES
TIED FOR TITLE
WISCONSIN JOINS LEADERS BY
WIN FROM
0. S. U.
CHICAGO, '20 WINNERS,
END IN 7TH PLACE
Michigan Furnishes Sensation of Year
By Whirlwind
Spurt
(Special to The Daily)
Madison, March 8.-Wisconsin went
into a triple tie for the Western Con-
ference basketball championship by
defeating Ohio State here tonight 34
to 24. The Badgers started the game
with a fast offensive attack which the
Buckeyes could not solve and the
score stood 24-5 before Meanwell's
men let up.
Blair played well for Ohio, while.
Taylor and McIntosh led the Badgers
scoring Williams and Frogner played
strong defensive games for Wiscon-
sin. Although the Badgers are tied
for the championship "with Michigan
and Purdue the former seem to have
a superior claim, in view of the fact
thalt they defeated 1chigan twice,
who in turn defeated Purdue twice.
Michigan, although not in a position
to claim the Conference championship,
will hardly be disputed in claiming the
best team in the west at the present
time. Any quintet that can win sev-
en straight games, as Michigan did,
from-the best teams in the Big Ten,
cannot be kept from consideration.
Michigan can also point to two victories
from Illinois, a feat that no other
team was able to imitate. Wisconsin
and Purdue were each defeated once
by the Indians.
(Continued on Page Three)
Tickets On Sale
For Girls' Play
The Junior Girls' play will be open
to women only as usual this year con-
trary to the report which was circulat-
ed early last semester. Several peti-
tions were sent to the committee on
student affairs asking that men be per-
mitted to attend the performances, but
these requests were refused in view
of the tradition that the play is really
in honor of the senior women.
Women of Ann Arbor, faculty wives,
alumnae, out-of-town guests, and Un-
iversity women are included in the list
of "eligibles" to the audience. Fathers
of members of the cast will be allowed
by special permission of Dean Myra
B. Jordan to witness the performance.
Three performances will be given
this year instead of two as in former
years. These will include two at
night, March 18 and 19, and one mati-
nee on Saturday, March 19. Tickets
for the general public go o sale at
10 o'clock this morning at Graham's
bookstore.
Tetrazzini Unable to Sing Here
Word has just been received by the
University School of Music from W.
H. Leahy, manager of Luisa Tetraz-
zini, that on account of a change in
her sailing date in May it will be im-
possible for her to fill engagement.
The management is in negotiation
with a distinguished artist to take

Madame Tetrazzini's place on program.
Musical Clubs Outline Trip
More than 40 members of the Glee
and Mandolin clubs met last night
with their directors in the Union to
discuss the probable program, which
will doubtless be presented about May
4 in Hill auditorium, and to outline
the annual trip taken by the club to
different cities.

STATE COMMANDER
TO -ADDRESS POST
State Commander Guy M. Wilson,
formerlyCcolonel of the 32nd division
overseas, will speak before a meeting
of the University post of the American
Legion at 7:30 o'clock tonight in the
reading room of the Union. No de-
finite subject for the speaker has been
announced, but being here in the in-
terest of the present drive for new
members, it is probable that Colonel
Wilson will have a good deal to say
concerning the campaign.
On the seventh day of the drive, the
Legion today changes its method some-
what and will endeavor to secure new
members by having a number of tables
placed about the campus at which ex-
service men may make application for
membership. Every man who is inter-
ested in becoming a member is urged
to signup at this time;for by so doing
he will save the committee the trouble
of calling on him.
A large number of persons have
asked what constitutes eligibility for
membership in the American Legion,
and to satisfy these queries, the state-
ment has been made that any man who
has received a bonus from the govern-
ment for war service shall be consid-
ered eligible.
HARDING TAKES UPi
War Department Announces Amer.
lean Troops Will Not Leave
Rhine*Yet

GERMAN TOWN OF
DUESSELDORF IN
FRENCH AND BRITISH FORCE'
TAKE OVER IMPORTANT
POSITIONS
MEET NO RESISTANCE
IN OCCUPYING CITY
Berlin Delegates to Reparation Con.
ference at London Leave for
Rome

.a
i
s
i
r
1
i
i
1

(By Associated Press-)
Duesseldorf, March 8.-French an(
British aeroplanes flew over Duessel
dorf this afternoon while Allied troops
with machine guns were taking posi
tions on the bridges and roads and i
the important factories. The inhab
itants of the city had not been pre
pared by the newspapers for the de
termination of the Allies to occupy ad
ditional German territory and were
surprised this morning at daybreak t
see Rhine boats mooring north an(
south of, the city loaded with Allies
troops and war materials. No resist
ance was offered to the occupation
Tanks Used
British tanks and cavalry landed ti
the north, and French artillery any
engineers to the south of the city.
The Anglo-French forces masse
around Duesseldorf while Belgian in
faniry, which had concentrated yes
terday at Creseld, crossed the bridg
into the center of the city.
The Allied quartermasters have ask
ed the mayor to give them possessioi
of certain schools, besides the bar
racks and railway station which hav
not yet been occupied.
Traffic with Obercassel, across th
Rhine, has stopped and telephon
communication with the town ha
been interrupted.
Administration Same
The administration of the newly oc
cupied territory will be the same a
that at present applied to the Rhine
land. German officials and employe
will carry on affairs according t
German laws and regulations but un
der the general control of the Allie
troops.

I

Knows Men
"He is not just an official - he is
a man who comes from one of the
high offices of the nation with a won-
derful knowledge of men and affairs,
and is able to discuss his observations
in a forceful and most fascinating
manner. There are few big men of
the nation who are really platform
stars - Thomas R. Marshall is one
of the few."
Met Many Men
During the past year Mr. Marshall
has enjoyed experiences which seldom
come even to vice-presidents. Through
circumstances it was his duty to re-
ceive and entertain officially the big
men and high diplomats of many gov-
ernments who visited the United
States. Among these are the King
and Queen of Belgium, the Prince of
Wales and Admiral Jellicoe.
PRES. BURTON'S SICKNESS
DIAGNOSED AS PNEUMONIA
President Marion L. Burton's ill-
ness, first reported to be pharyngitis,
was yesterday diagnosed as pneumo-
nia. Although the case is not regard-
ed as serious, it is expected that he
wil be confined to his home for some
time. He was reported last night to
be resting well.
It is thought that his trip to Atlan-
tic City to address the meeting of the
national educational conference was
made too soon after he recovered
from his first illness.

CO-OPERATION IN CABINET
OBJECTIVE OF PRESIDENTE
(By Associated Press)z
Washington, March 8.-Various as-
pects of the nation's foreign relations
as well as problems of administra-1
tive organization, were considered byc
President Harding and his depart-1
ment heads today at the first cabinet
meeting of the new administration.
Afterwards delfnite announcement<
was made at the war department thatt
in formulating its policy toward the1
German situation this government is
not now considering a withdrawal oft
the American troops of occupation. It+
was learned at the same time that ast
another step towards Pan-American
amity the President is preparing to
ask that the senate ratify at once the+
long pending treaty with Colombia.+
In the realm of domestic questions
major attention was directed towardsl
perfection of the cabinet organization
into a smoothly working machine.1
Mr. Harding is understood to have
made co-operation among the depart-t
ments the keynote of his preliminary
instructions.
FRESHMAN GLEE CLUB TO
ELECT OFFICERS TONIGHT
Election of officers will be the main
business of the Fresh Glee club at
tomorrow night's rehearsal at the
Union.
Mr. Thomas, of the School of Music
and director of the Fresh Glee club,
has nominated three men for each
office, the names to be balloted upon.
They are: For president, James Dry-
er, Lloyd Wertman, and Ralph H. Ex-
cell; for vice-president, Kenneth B.
Babcock, Robert Manchester, and
Fred Bliss; for secretary-treasurer,
Rollin Shouldice, Donald Chubb, and
Charles Hale; for librarian, Arnold
Pratt, Donald B. Frederick, and Har-
old A. Storms. Mr. Thomas has ap-
pointed Ben H. Lee Jr. publicity man-
ager of the club.
No Flowers ,at Soph Prom
No corsages will be worn at the
Soph Prom, March 11, following action
taken by the committee at a meeting
yesterday, prohibiting flowers on the
floor. Opportunity to check them will
be given at the door.

London, March 8. The German
delegates to the reparation confer-
ence here left London for Berlin at
2 o'olock this afternoon and seemed
pleased to get away.,Their departure
was without incident, a number of
persons, mostly German residents of
London, being at the station to see
them off.
COSMOPOLITAN S TO
GIVE ANNUAL PLAY
"All Nations Fandango" is the
name that has been given to the an-
nual production 'of the Cosmopolitan
club, announceemnt having been
made yesterday that the entertain-
ment will be given at 8 o'clock Thurs-
day evening, March 17, in Hill audi-
torium. French, Polish, Chinese, Jap-
anese, American, Hindu, Canadian,
South American and Hawaiian acts
make up the bill.
Committees named by F. C. Liu,
'21L; general chairman, are as fol-
lows: Stage manager, James Adams,
instructor in economics; tickets, Rev.
Lloyd Wallick; music, K. Horiuchi,
'21; program, H. R. Chapel, '23, and
David Preston, '23; posters, C. G.
Mihara, '22; eligibility, H. H. Lu, '23;
treasurer, P. C. Bingham, '22.
PROF. X. P. TI4LEY TAKEN
SICK WITH PHARYNGITIS
Prof. M. P. Tilley of the English
department is confined to his bed with
pharyngitis and will be unable to meet
with his classes for several days.

..

U U
I I

TONIGHT
AT
Whitney
Theatre

COMEDY C LVB PRESENTS
Bunty Pulls the Strings
A Scotch Comedy

TONIGHT
Tickets $1.00, $1.60
AT
Grahams and
Whitney
Box Office

8:15

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan