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March 08, 1921 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Spring Skirts Tailored Free
See our beautiful line of woolens,
all colors and weaves, plain and
new pleated models to select from.
THE WISTERIA SHOP
330 Maynard Street

LEGISLATORlS TRY
TO CLEAN SLATE

'E
t
Y
t

Groesbecek's Program For Union
State Boards Now Up For
Approval

of

NOW
The

O PEN

Castle"

THE FORIGINAL HOME OF
HOME COOKED MEALS
STATE St. at HILL St.
VAN'S LUNC

Where they all go

1116 So. University Ave.

Ann Arbor May Festival
May 18, 19, 20, 21, 1921

ARTISTS

LUISA

TETRAZZINI
Celebrated Opera and Concert Star

ROSA PONSELLE
Metropolitan Opera Company,
FLORENCE HINKLE
American Oratorio Singer
CYRENA VAN GORDEN
Chicago Opera Association
MERLE ALCOCK
A Premiere Concert Artist
TITO SCHIPA
Chicago Opera Association
CHARLES MARSHALL
(CARLO MARZIALE)
Chicago Opera Association
LAMBERT MURPHY
A Brillant Artist
THEODORE HARRISON
An American Favorite
ARTHUR MIDDLETON
Metropolitan Opera Company
CHASE B. SIKES
..A Splendid Young Artist
GUSTAF HOLMQUIST
A Real Bass

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SOPRANOS

CONTRALTOS

CAPITAL PUNISHMENT BILL 1
READY FOR HOUSE ACTION
Lansing, March 7.-Leaders of the
legislature returned today after the ,
recess determined to order "full speed?
ahead" in an effort to cut down the
number of bills yet to be acted uponj
before the lawmakers enter the home
stretch of the present session.
A persistent rumor is being circu-
lated that a concurrent resolution will
be introduced, probably this week,
calling for final adjournment April 10.
Such a resolution would provide the
necessary. stimulus for greater speed,
it is pointed out'
If April 10 adjournment is decided,
upon the lawmakers will have but four
more weeks after the present in which
to finish the business of the present
sitting.
Bonus Bill Passed
Outstanding among the legislative
events of the last week is passage of
the resolution providing submission to
the people of a constitutional amend-
ment authorizing the state to borrow
money to pay soldier bonuses. The
proposition will appear on the ballot
in the April election. The plan pro-
vides for raising $30,000,000. Compen-
sation would be made to all ex-service
men and women at the rate of $15 for
each month of service up to August 1,
1919.
One of the biggest fights of the ses-
sion, that on capital punishment, will
be before the house members when
they reconvene tonight. The bill has
bee~n reported out of committee with-
out recommendation and the battle
will be fought on the floor. Final
action on the bill may come in both
houses this week.
Another important bill is promised
in the house this week in the measure
proposing that certain state officers
now elected shall1be named by the gov-
ernor. These officers are the secretary
of state, state treasurer, attorney gen-
eral, superintendent of public instruc-
tio4. and the highway 'commissioner.
Budget Work Going On
Governor Groesbeck's program for
consolidation of state boards and bu-
reaus is a step nearer fulfillment and
the present week is expected to see it
moved rapidly forward. The agricul-
tural board bill, now in committee,
may be reported out tonigl4 This
measure would place the state in
charge of the stateufair and regroup a
number of agricultural boards.
The state administrative board, that
'is considering requests of state de-
partments for money from the emerg-
ency fund, will continue its work this
week. Budgets of several departments
are being trmmed sharply by the
board.
CRAFTSMEN HONOR
MEMORY OF BAKER
Impressive memorial services were
held for Joe daaker, famous track ath-
lete, Saturday night in the Masonic
hall. The services were directed by
the Craftsmen club of the University.
Appreciations of Joe Baker were pre-
sented from three viewpoints-broth-
er, athlete, and student.
H. H. Akers, '22, a member of
Baker's fraternity, presented a few
statements accentuating Baker's
"wholesomeness of character and-sin-
cere affection for everyone, especially
children."
Dr. G. A. May, director of Waterman
gymnasium, stated that he "would
classify Joe Baker as the ideal ath-
lete." "Baker," he said, "possessed a
pleasing personality, an agregable dis-
position and was highly amenable to
all conditions of the training period.

I believe that I voice the sentiment of
all 'M' athletes when I say that we
esteemed Joe Baker very highly, not
only as an athlete but also as a sin-
cere fri end."
Prof. B. F. Bailey, of the electrical
engineering department, cited an inci-
dent that, once when speaking to a
couple of his associates of the faculty,
he mentioned that he had a student in
one of his classes whom he considered
absolutely sincere and honest in his
work. Instantly two of the gentlemen
spoke up saying, they were sure that
he meant Joe Baker. H. T. Ward,1
'21E, then presented a deep apprecia-
tion. The services were closed by an
appropriate organ selection.
Try Daily advertising and watch
your business grow.-Adv.
Daily advertising will spell prosper-
ity for you.-Adv.

AUTO-LOTIVE LABORATORY
GIVEN BUICN CHASSIS
One of the recent additions to the
equipment of the automotive labora-
tory is a 1921 Buick chassis, secured
through the engineering department of
that company.
It is not the intention of the auto-
motive engineering department to use
the new engine for actual road tests,
but to mount it for demonstration and
classroom purposes. The main use of
the new model will be to illustrate
wirigg, set-up, and latest develop-
ments in motor design. The instru-
ment board and all unnecessary cover-
ing have been removed in order that
the working and arrangement of the
different units may be better observed.
Through an agreement of the Buick
company, one new Buick chassis will
be loaned to the University each year,
enabling the classes to keep posted on
each improvement in design.
University to Set Out Shrubs
With the coming of spring shrubs
will be planted about the home of
President Marion L. Burton and inj
several other places according to anl
announcement by the buildings and
grounds department.

Hart Schaffner
'The high quality makes them the
most economical clothes yo t can buy
Hart, Sch afncr and Marx

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213 E. LIBERTY ST.

715 N. UNIV. AVE.

PHONE 294F1 = F2

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1

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Spring Clothes

_______ ___ ____________________________ _________________ 1I

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TENORS

AL L of the latest style ideas are
here. You ought to see them.
Coats are more loosely draped; shoul-
are more square; the coat openings
are lower; the lines are simple but

I

BARITONES

distinctive.

There

are new

color-

I

BASS

'ANNIE BLOOMFIELD-ZEISLER
America's Greatest Woman Pianist

PIANIST

UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION Albert A. Stanley, Conductor
Three Hundred Singers
A CHORUS OF CHILDREN George Oscar Bowen, Conductor
Several Hundred School Children
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Frederick Stock, Conductor
Seventy Players
SCHEDULE OF PRICES FOR TICKETS
(All Tickets are Exempt from War Tax)
Orders for course Festival tickets (with remittance) should be
sent in BY MAIL at the earliest possible date. They will be filed and
filled in the order of receipt, and tickets will be mailed out about.
April first.
BLOCK "A"-Three central -sections (2-3-4) on the Main Floor
and the first Eight Rows in the First Balcony.... 7.00
BLOCK "B"-Two side sections (1 and 5) on the Main Floor and
the last Seven Rows in the First Balcony........ $6.00
BLOCK "C",-First Fourteen Rows in the Second Balcony......$5.00
BLOCK "D"-Last Nine Rows in the Second Balcony...........$4.50
Holders of Pre-Festival Course Tickets should deduct $3.00 from
the above mentioned prices provided they return the "cover-coupon"
attached thereto, the schedule then being: BLOCK "A"-$4.00; BLOCK
"B"-$3.00; BLOCK "C"-$2.00; BLOCK "D"-$1.50.
Please address all orders and make remittances payable to
CHARLES A. SINK, SECRETARY, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN.
PUBLIC SALE OF COURSE PICKETS - On Saturday morning,
March 19, at eight o'clock, all course tickets not ordered by mail will
be placed on public sale at the UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC,
Maynard Street, at the rates mentioned above.
TICKETS FOR INDIVIDUAL CONCERTS-On Saturday morning,
May 7, at eight o'clock, all unsold course tickets will be broken up and
placed on sale at $1.00, $1.50 and $2.00 each for individual concerts.
NOTICE
The right is reserved to make such changes in the programs, or
in the personnel of the artists announced as necessity may demand.
All tickets are purchased with the distinct understanding that under
no condition will they be taken back at the office, nor does the office
assume any responsibility, whatsoever, for tickets lost, stolen, mislaid,
or destroyed in any manner.

ings and patterns in fabrics. Also
new designs in Topcoats.
Spring Suits priced $30 to $50
Spring Topcoats at $20 to $35
New Raincoats are $10 to $25
ART, Schaffner and Marx *inter
suits are being cleared at $17. 5

e-

_ 50
$26.- and $3.-. Excellent in all'de-
tails, they're remarkable low-priced
values.
They'll give satisfaCton
If not---Money back
ReuleConlinFiWegeintCo
Main at Wash ingtoni

4;i

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