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March 06, 1921 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUN

G

LASHES

FROM THE

I

I

IN ANN ARBOR THIS WEEK

i

LREEN AND STAGE

that name. The all-star cast is only
fair, but the story is intensely inter-
esting, telling of the troubles of a
twin who takes the blame for a mur-
der committed by his brother, leaving
the girl he loves et cetera, but he
meets her again later and they fix it
up so that no one has any kick
coming.
Real pearls, false pearls, a crook,
a poor girl visiting her rich aunt,-
jumble all these together and you
have Dorothy Gish's latest comedy,

his play, "Villa Rosa." Mr. Skinner
needs no introduction or recommen-
dation to Ann Arbor audiences and
this new vehicle is exceedingly well
adapted to the actor's personality.
G-radAdvises
Students To
Learn Jok

plete so successfully ,as to afford an
unlooked-for sale. And then there is
Frank Swinnerton. There is hardly
a single one of his novels which does
not strike the key-note of excellence
in realistic fiction. "Shops and
Houses," "Nocturne," "September"-
all are certainly worth the time spent
with them.
It is so easy to go on and on, naming
this book and that one that this article
might run on forever, but your editor

will say that space forbids writing
more. As I look over the pages com-
pleted, it seems that there is a fair
sized group of authors enumerated,
and yet only the surface has been
scratched. But if every student on the-
campus of the University reads all of
the books which have been listed, aad
what is mote, if he enjoys them, he
may pride himself that he has really
acquired a true understanding of good
literature.

(By Edwin R. Meiss)

111am DeMille in his third pro-
on as a rival to brother Cecil,
at last achieved a semblance of
orthy ability in "Midsummer
cess," a Cosmo Hamilton novel
ted to the screen and scheduled
&eMajestic for the first four days
is week. The two pairs of com-
tively young marrieds have been
emely well chosen in the persons
ois Wilson, Lila Lee, Jack Holt
Conrad Nagel, four of the most
ining personalities of the screen.
old theme underlies the story
h deals with the results of matri-
ial ennui upon the romantic wife
ne couple and the adventurous
and of the other.

is in the habit of humoring her like
a gouty foot, even to the extent of
consenting to marry the son of mama's
best friend. But a proverbially beau-
tiful doctor steps in, and upsets
mama's plans. The entrancing per-
sonality of Constance Talmadge is,
a most attractive feature of the pic-
ture.
* * *
Charles Maigne (in honor of whom
the old French king was probably
named) offers his production, "The
Kentuckian's" at the Majestic from
Thursday through the remainder of
the week. Monte Blue and Wilfred
Lytell both4 have large parts in this
cinema, but a welcomeaddition to the
screen roster, a pretty blonde of great
yossibilities entitled Diana Allen, is
the- most interesting member of the
cast. The picture deserves credit in
that it is different from the ordinary
run of screen plays, and portrays life
as it really is, especially in the con-
clusion.
* * * *
The Arcade offers for its midweek
show "Not Guilty," a screen adapta-
tion of Harold MacGrath's novel by

*

* *

Mama's Affair," with Constance
.madge as daughter Eve, appears
the Arcade today. As usual the
y is light enough to prevent tears
rn destroying the complexions of
"calcimined sex" (to quote an
inent professor) and just heavy
>ugh to'assure no cracked lips. Eve
3 a mother who is seized with a
,se of nerves" whenever her com-
t is disturbed. Consequently Eve

"The Ghost in the Garret," which (Continued from Page One)
plays at the Arcade on Friday and is Joseph Hergesheimer's latest book,
Saturday. Dorothy is accused of "San , Cristobal de la Habana,"
stealing.-a necklace, but by the use of (Knopf) which is the truly formid-
white sheets in a ghost stunt she able full name of what we know
comes out with colors flying and as Habana, Cuba. If you know Joseph
weds, you know,-the only man. With Hergesheimer, with his "Three Black
any other but this little comedienne Pennies," "Java Head," "Linda Con-
in the stellar role this play might don," and others, there is no need of
have been dank, dark and dramatic, a recommendation of his newest ven-
but Dorothy allows of nothing like ture. If you don't know him, let not
that. another day pass without making his
.*acquaintance. He is one of the most
At the Shubert-Detroit Opera House refreshing, the most sincerely charm-
in the dwindling metropolis, William ing of our contemporary writers. His
Hodge opens a week's engagement books are as interesting as a detective
today in a return showing of his own yarn, yet they are real literature.
play, "The Guest of Honor." This is ChestertonI Recommended
a romantic comedy of New York life, G. K. Chesterton has not been idle
telling the story of a young author during the past two years, and "'Or,
struggling to gain success and carry- the Uses of Diversity" (Dodd, Mead &
ing with him an adopted boy. The Co.) and "The New Jerusalem," bear
play is full of optimism and a genial witness of his efforts. The former is
American atmosphere pervades it. a collection of brilliant and most in-
teresting essays on all manner of sub-
Otis Skinner appears at the Whit- jects; the latter contains an account
n thseaktnernextSatrdatntheWin-of the coming of the British into
ney theater next Saturday night in Mesopotamia and its result. Chester-
ton in these two, his latest books, does
not fail to come up to the standard
which he has set for himself in for-
mer works.
SELECTION Oh, and don't forget H. G. Wells'
"Outline of History," a really colossal
G. Verdi's task which he has managed to com-

TODAY'S CHURCH, SERVICES '

Cor. Catherine and Division Sts.
Rev. Henry Tatlock, D.D., Rector
Rev. Charles T. Webb, Curate
7:35 A. M. - Holy Communion.
10:30 A. M.-Holy (Communion
and Sermon by the Rev. Milo
H. Gates, D.D., Vicar of the
Chapel of the Intercession,
(Trinity Parish), New York
City, "Sight from Christ."
4:30 P. M.-Evening Service and
Address by tthe Curate, "The
Fullness of Time."
ANN ARBOR
BIBLE CHAIR

CHURCH OF CHRIST
DISCIPLES
South University Ave.
Dri Iden will have charge of
the Memorial Service for Archi-
band McLean who died at Battle
Creek a short time ago. He was
connected with the Foreign
work of the Disciples for near-
ly forty years.
F. P. Arthur speaks in the even-
ing at 7:30.
A series of educational sermons
start in March. All students
invited.
F. P., ARTHUR, PAsToR
11111t1111111111111 111Eiilligllllll lt lfll , -.
TRINITY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Fifth Ave. and William St.
Rev. Lloyd Mer Wallick,
c Pastorc
At the morning service Rev.
Lloyd Merl Wallick, Lutheran
student pastor in the Univer-
sity, will be the preacher.
11:30 A. M. - Sunday School. S
:7111111IlmnnUmili111I'l11111fW7

,I

OVERTURE
G. Rossini
Italians
in Algeria!

Opera
Un Bal in
Maschera

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Church Edifice, 409 S. Division

'I

Headquarters in Lane Hall.
Classes meet in the "Upper
Room."
Upper Room Bible Class Sat-
urday evenings. University
Men's Bible Class Sunday
morning.
Ask for printed circular an-
nouncing six courses.
Read the Upper Room Bulletin.
THOMAS M. IDEN,
Instructor.

TODAY - TOMORROW -TUESDAY

I

CON5TAN$IT t

-?-t-s.
- c ,.
s s ."- '
A
r 'w.V
r'~~ , 6 -

Sunday services at 10:30 A.M.
The subject is "Man." Testi-
monial meeting, Wednesday ev-
ening at 7:30. A cordial invita-
tion is extended to all. Sunday
School at 11:45 A. M., to which
pupils under 20 years may be
admitted. A public reading
room, 236 Nickels Arcade, is
open daily, except Sundays and
holidays, from 12 to 5 o'clock.

I-

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

I

CORNER HURON AND DIVISION
COMMUNION AND RECEPTION
OF NEW MEMBERS

11

I

.

FIRST
BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron St., Below State
J. M. WELLS, MINISTER
321 East Ann Street,
10:30 A. M. - Baptismal and
Communion Service. Sermon-
ette by J. M. Wells. "Real
Meaning of Baptism."
Music under the direction of
Mrs. George B. Rhead.
12:00 Noon. - Men's Forum will
consider, "The Proposed City
Charter." Prof. H. L. Wilgus
will speak. Men with ques-
tions and objections are invit-
ed.
6:30 P. M.-Guild Meeting.

12:00 Noon.-Prof. W. D. Henderson's Class. "Men and Women of the
Bible." For students.-
6:00 P. M.-Social Half-Hour. Young People's Meeting. Harold
Heller, Leader. Topic-"Conscience."
Musical Numbers by the Choir.-"God so Loved the World"-
Stainer. "Peace I Leave with You"-Roberts.
Special Events in March.-Cleland B. McAfee, McCormack Sem-
inary, speaks March 20. Banquet for all Presbyterian students March
24.

I

A.Mmmmmw-

=:

I

I

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
REV. ARTHUR W. STALKER, D.D., Pastor

MISS ELLEN W. MOORE, Student Director

d

I

I

Sunday, March 6, 1921

UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Sts.
SIDNEY S. ROBINS, Minister

10:30 A. M. Communion Service.
12:00 Noon. Student Bible Classes.
6:00 P. M. Wesleyan Guild Devotional Meeting.
, Special Music for the Day.-"Agnus Dei (Tours), the Chorus;
"The Lord is My Shepherd" (Wheeler-Ward), Mr. William Wheeler.

i

March 6, 1921

10:40 A. M.-"The Place of Feel-
ing in Religion." It certainly
has a place, and there is such
a thing as an irrational ra-
tionalism.
5:30 P. M.-Y. P. R. U. Social
Hour.
6:00 P. M. - A Discussion, to
last until the hour of the Uni-
versity Service.
All Seats Free at Church, and
at all meetings. A cordial wel-
come to" strangers.

-SPECIAL INVITATION TO ALL STUDENTS

j RT

A:

Sl

l1

s

11-

ZION LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Fifth Ave. and Washington St.
REV. E. C. STELLHORN,
Pastor
120 Packard Street

i
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1
1
1
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~

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
MORNING WORSHIP
10:25
Mr. Mershon speaks:
JUDAS, PAST AND PRESENT
University Religious Forum, 12:00. Prof. Thos. E
Rankin speaks: "The Effect of the Great War on Liter-
ature."
Congregational Students meet at 6:00. Bernard L.
Peckwith '21 E. of Argentine and uis G. Bustamente,

He Offered Her Freedom--for a Kiss
A HIGH-SPIRITED American girl found herself heels-over-head in a revolution in the
fiery little republic of Santiago. One night while carrying a messa e from the rebel garri-
son, she was captured and imprisoned by the handsome, dashing leader of the enemy.
He offered her freedom for a kiss-which she refused. For genuine romance and pictur-
esque settings and for a heroine who is full of sparkle and life-don't fail to see CON-
STANCE BINNEY in "SOMETHING DIFEERENT."

I.-

CLYDE COOK - SHOWS THE VERY LATEST
COMEDY2:00-3:30 7:00-8:30
COMEDY
PRICES FoX NEWS.
"AL L WRONG" Adults 30c, Children 10 c

"Jesus stands in judgment be-
fore us. Will you admire His
manhood and reject His Divine
claims? Let us be logical and
sensible. Jesus is what He
claimed to be, or else He is a
dangerous impostor who deserv-
es to be condemned."
10:30 A. M. - (German) "The
History of a Saved Soul."
7:30 P. M. - (English) "Pilate
- and You and I - Judging
Christ."

I

, l & l l A , -t {.i11 , 4i
'23, of Bolivia, will speak.
il ,--

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yi ava ana.csvaa i.v }

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