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March 04, 1921 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAIL I

ILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

e I

FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 1921.

Number 103.

taft Club:
he Staff Club, Homoeopathic Hospital, wil. be addressed by
nder G. Ruthven, Professor of Zoology, today at noon, dinner
W. B. HINSDALE,
Dean of Homoeopathic Medical School.

Mr.
fol-

ersity Club:
There will bea social meeting of the Club Friday, March 4, at 8 p. M.
ic, papers by several members, and refreshments.
F. E. ROBBINS, Secretary.
ection:
An error in typesetting caused Martin Ten Hoor's signature to appear as
ident, Graduate School, instead of President, Graduate Club, as sub-
d by him.
Ucal Science 1. Make-up Exam.
Those members of Political Science 1 who were absent from the final
nination will have an opportunity to complete their work by taking an
ination Saturday, March 5, at 9 a. m. in Room 102, Economics building.
J. S. REEVES.
Players Club,
shall be in my office back of the stage in University Hall today (Fri-
March 4) from from 10:12 and from 2-4 to consult with members of
Players Club who wish to be considered for a part in The Great
oto or in other plays or programs to be presented by this club.
R. D. T. HOLLISTER.
Ion of Camp Davis, 1921:
Students who plan going to Camp Davis this summer will be divided into
groups as nearly equal in number as may be possible. The first session
is on June 6, students reaching camp the preceding Saturday. The
nd session begins on August 1, students reporting at camp on Saturday,
30. Students may express their choice between the first and second
p by signing a preliminary roll at the Instrument Room, Department of
eying. The Staff will later make such changes as may be necessary to
e the two groups approximately equal in numbers.
CLARENCE T. JOHNSTON,
Director, Camp Davis.
.1 8 03.
Note Economics Bulletin Board tor new arrangement of sections to
effect Thursday, March S. C. C. EDMONDS.
omics Course 2:
Every student is expected to attend the section to which he has been as-
,d on either Tuesday or Wednesday. In case of conflicts Mr. Lubin
Id be consulted in Room 6, on either Wednesday or Thursday after-
Due to an error in the printing the following students have by mis-
been assigned to Section 17. They should appear in Section 27, meet-
on Wednesday and Friday at 2 o'clock in Room 104:
I. Berman, H. C. Bond, H. L. Bradley, N. Cook, C. E. Curtis, E. V. Fer-
R. Gregory, M. Hensick, B. Hoek, H. J. Liverance, Lucian Lane, J.
iammer, F. Plate, W. C. Ryder, E. J. Sauer, G. L. Stone, A. H. Taylor,

, F. L. Young.

DAVID FRIDAY.

STATE MUSIC CONTEST
TO BE HELD NEXT WEEK
MUSICIANS COMING HERE FROM
ALL PARTS OF STATE
FOR EVENT
Those who entered the state music
contest held under the supervision of
the State Federation of Musical clubs
will be heard on Monday and Tues-
day, March 8 and 9, at the Michigan
Union. Violinists will play at 9
o'clock Monday, pianists at 9 o'clock
Tuesday, and vocalists will sing on
Monday afternoon beginning at 1
o'clock.
The contest to be given at Ann
Arbor is one of all state contestants.
The successful musicians will be giv-
en opportunity to enter district and
,national contests. The purpose of
these contests is to encourage and
inspire music students to greater ef-
fort in artistic achievement and to
give opportunity for public appear-
an e.
Members of the Matinee Musicale
society are invited to meet all dele-
gates of the federation at a reception
to be held from 4 to 6 o'clock Monday
at the Martha Cook building.
SOLDIER BONUS WILL 60
BEFORE TOTER S OF STATE
By a resolution of the legislature
the $30,000,000 issue of state bonds,
thge proceds of which wil be used to
pay a bonus to the soldiers, sailors,
marines and nurses who went from
this state to serve in the World war,
will be placed before the voters in the
coming election.
The resolution, introduced by Rep-
resentative Frank B. Aldirch, of She-
boygan, provides for compensating
veterans at the rate of $15 for each
month or major fraction of a month
of service. An enabling clause in the
measure provides for the distribution
of the fund by a commission compos-
ed of the governor and other state
officials.
The only vote recorded against
placing the measure on the ballot was
that of Representative William L.
Case of Leelanau county, who explain-
ed his position by saying that he be-
lieevd the payment of a bonus to vet-
erans was a matter for the federal
government to handle.
NAME L E W IS FOR
MAYORALTY RACE
In the primary held Wednesday,
George E. Lewis received the Repub-
lican nomination for mayor by defeat-
ing Andrew J. Sawyer by a majority
greater than two to one. Lewis re-
ceived 2,698 votes, while Sawyer re-
ceived 1,266, giving Lewis a majority
of 1,432 votes.
The race for two councilmen-at-
large proved to be close, Fred Heu-
sel, Jr., and Howard K. Holland be-
ing nominated by small pluralities
over Laverne o. Cushing.
John W. Dwyer, candidate for may-
or on the Democratic ticket without
opposition, received only 42 votes in
the entire city.
Herbert Crippen for city assessor,
R. E. Reichert for president of the
council, and John D. Thomas for jus-
tice of the peace were all nominated
by comfortable majorities, Thomas re-
ceiving the highest votes of any un-
opposed candidate.

The proposed city charter will be
voted upon at the April election.
JUNIOR COLLEGES SEEN AS
RELIEF FOR CONGESTION
Dr. Paul H. Voelker, president of
Olivet college, addressing the Rotary
club at Battle Creek Tuesday pre-
sented a new solution to the over-
crowding problem as faced by Mich-
igan.
After stating that the $9,000,000,000
asked by President Marion L. Burton
should be granted by the state, Dr.
Voelker said that the condition of
over-crowding might be relieved by
diverting the Freshmen and Sopho-
mores to the junior colleges, such as
Detroit, Grand Rapids, Filnt and de-
nominational schools such as Albion,
Olivet, Kalamazoo and Hillsdale.
The student then finishes his edu-
cation at the University, according
to Dr. Voelker's plan.
JUNIOR LIT TREASURER ASKS
PAYMENT OF CLASS DUES
In the second campaign this year
for the collection of junior lit dues,
'so far only about $60 have been re-
ceived, according to F. M. Smith,
treasurer of the class. Every junior is
urged to pay his class dues at once
that enough money may be had to

carry out the annual smoker and oth-
er class affairs. Dues will be re-
ceived from 8 o'clock to 4 o'clock to-
day by Smith at the booth opposite
the regis'trar's office in University
hall.
Cubs Kept 2lusy
1(acking Ig ains
As Phone Rings
"Can you tell me if 'Slicker Parks
ever losta ball game'?"
"Do you know who won the fight?"
"How many .E's' does it take to get
kicked out of the lit school?"
"Where is Registrar Hall located?"
"Will Michigan compete in the East
next year on the gridiron?"
"'Why?"-"Please tell me, do."--
"Won't you decide this little question,
a bunch of fellows have come to a
standstill-Why, why, Why?"
And on into the night the poor cub
reporters at The Daily rack their
brains for plausible answers to the
seemingly thousands of non-descript
questions that flow into the Universi-
ty's official publication's office.
Granted, The Daily }prints news.
The Daily staff knows news. How-
ever, that doesn't mean that the third
assistant water carrier to the night
editor knows why Sapolio doesn't float
as fluently as Ivory soap.
But th-e phone keeps ringing, the
reporters continue to gasp for air and
begin in long treatises to explain the
why, wherefore, and history of any
subject that may be brought up for
discussion. They usually hit it about
right, so-with the help of God and an
almanac-The Daily hopes to keep on
phone frolics" till the millennium ar-
rives.

1-2 Price
Suits and Overcoats
Top Coats, Raincoats
Flannelette Night Robes
and Pajamas
1-3 Oft Sport Coats
Wadhams & Co.
TWO COMPLETE STORES

STATE STREET

MAIN STREET

I

For Economics Course 2
Hamilton's

"Current

Economic

Problems"

W

l~ntamu al I emsJerome's soph engineers, and the low-
er and upper dents will battle.
One game in the interclass basket- The game between Sterling's frosh
ball league played Wednesday night lits and Crawforth's soph lits has been
resulted in a 21 to 8 victory for the forfeited to the second year men, the
yearlings having played a man from
soph engineers over the frosh engi-" another class.
neers.

AHR9's

University
Bookstores

vI Other students are taking advantage
The schedule for tonight calls for of our full coarse in typewriting,
all games to start at 7:30 o'clock. which we offer for only $10.00. Learn
to typewrite while in college. School
The architects will meet the phar- of Shorthand, 711 N. Univ. Begin at
mics, Old's soph engieers will face any time.-Adv.
tU

WHAT'S GOING ON
FRIDAY
-Junior Girls' play rehearsal,
.rah Caswell Angell hall.
-Junior Girls' play rehearsal,
,rah Caswell Angell hall.
-Westerners' club social com-
ttee meeting, Union.
-University Boxing club meets,
nion.
-Regular meeting of Alpha Nu
. the fourth floor, University hall.
-Bayonne club meets in room
4, Union.
-Gospel 'meeting, Lane_ hall.

SATURDAY
-Meeting of Craftsmen's club
Masonic temple.

in

U-NOTICES
University Boxing club meets at
o'clock every Tuesday and Thurs-
,y in Waterman gymnasium.
sophomore engineers who have not
Od anything on a slide rule must
ty in full by 6 o'clock Friday, oth-
wise the rules will be sold to the
st comer for $11.60. Make pay-
ants to J. E. Johns, 1437 Washten-
i avenue, or to John H. Hills, 1003
Huron. Make checks payable to
hn H. Hills.
next assembly for sophomore eng-
eers will be held at 9 o'clock on
iesday, March 8, in room 348,
gineering building.
orial services will be held for Joe
iker at the meeting of the Crafts-
en's club.
informal Varsity soccer team will
ve their picture taken for the
chiganensian at Spedding's, Sat-
day afternoon at 2 o'clock. The
an must get their uniforms from
ach Mitchell for the picture.

Hesto! Just Gold'
Presto! Jewels!
Howard D. Fellows, '24E, today finds
himself wealthier by approximate-
ly $2,000 due to a lucky discovery of
two diamonds which were inclosed
in some old family earrings. The ear-
rings appeared to be solid round
gold balls and Fellows bad taken
them to Schlanderer and Seyfried, city
jewelers, with the intention of selling
them for old gold. The clerk who ex-
amined the trinkets discovered a
slight rattle in them and this led him
to examine the construction more
carefully. A small catch was found
and upon being opened disclosed the
diamonds.
The stones appear to be of fine
quality and weigh two karat each.
On each diamond there was a little
hook which leads the jewelers to be-1
lieve that the earrings were worn
either with or without the gold balls
which enclosed them at the time Fel-
lows attempted to dispose of them.
FARRELL AND PRATT SPEAK
AT DETROIT ALUMNI LUNCHEON
"Steve" Farrell, Michigan track
coach, and Derrill Pratt, Varsity bas-
ketball mentor, spoke Thursday noon
at a well attended luncheon of the
University of Michigan club at the
Hotel Cadillac in Detroit. "Steve"
told his audience what his team has
accomplished thus far this season.
From the applause which greeted the
coach it was evident that the listen-
ers were pleased with the optimistic
reports that he gave. As the base-
ball team has not been practicing
long, Derrill Pratt' could not give as
definite predictions for his protegees
but nevertheless satisfied his audi-
ence.
PROF. J. S. REEVES TO SPEAK
AT HARRIS HALL SUNDAY

4'QUALiY.
RIO

f

*s

- t
T HE DI SC RI MI N A
A T
LROM ALUMIN
buying aluminum ware, there are three
Is it substantial? Is it practical? And

. ¢QUALITY.
R1

F d R
MIR
When
consider:

T I N G
T
things to
is it con-

venient?
Mirro Aluminum is all these things and more. That is
why we feature Mirro in this store. The metal from which
Mirro is made is 99% pure aluminum, rolled repeatedly under
heavy pressure to insure long wear.
Mirro lasts for years. Mirro is also beautiful. And it is
famous for its many conveniences.
Mirro Aluminum comes in the rich Colonial design (shown
in illustration) or in the more familiar round style. Our dis-
play includes no end of useful and attractive Mirro utensils
from which to make selection. Prices are really moderate.
You are invited to make a visit of inspection to our Mirro
Aluminum section.

JUNIOR LIT DUES

iI
r

unior literary class dues will
payable from 8 to 4 o'clock to-
r at the booth in the main cor-
or of University hall. It is
essary that these be paid if
class is to hold any further
al events. Fees are $1 per

Prof. Jesse S. Reeves, of the politic-
al science department, will be the
speaker next Sunday at the first of
two "get togther" suppers at Harris
hall. His subject will be "Christian
Missions and International Relations."
The supper will be at 6 o'clock.
Students who expect to attend are
asked to telephone reservations td
Harris hall. J. A. Bursley, Dean of
Students, will speak at a similar af-
fair on arol 13.

JNO . C.
Up to
MAIN NEAR

FISHER
the Minute Hardware
WASH.-WASH. NEAR MAIN

''QUALITY.{
&7
GA RI g

CO.

I I .
~-QUALITY.
'0
gu rr

i

I

I

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