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March 04, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-04

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THE WEATHER
FAIR; CONTINUED COLD
TODA1Y

r34

~Iute

ASSoCIATED
PRESS
DIAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SEUVIt1'ICE

VOL.. XXXI. No. 103. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 4 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTS

FORONEY TARIFF
MEASURE VETOD
BY PRES. WILSON
iMESSA(1E SAYS THIS IS NO TIME
FOR HIGH TRADE
BARRIERS
HOUSE KILLS MANY
BILLS IN LAST RUSH
Navy Appropriation for $395,000,000
Not Expected to Piss Durng
Present Session
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 3.-The Fordney
emergency tariff bill was vetoed late
today by President Wilson in a mess-
age which declared that "this is no
time for the erection here of high
trade barriers" and that the measure
"would not furnish" in any substan-
tial degree that sought by the produc-
ers of most of the stable commodi-
ties which it covers. Action on the
veto is expected in the house and pos-
sibly the senate tonight, with the in-
dication for overriding it considera-
bly in doubt.
"The situation in which many of the
farmers of the country find them-
selves cannot be remedied by a meas-
ure of this sort," the President said in
his message. "The farmer needs a bet-
ter system of domestic marketing and
credit," he said, "but especially a larg-
er foreign market for his surplus
products. Clearly measures of this
sort," he continued, "will not con-
duce to an expansion of the foreign
market."
Washington, March 3.-Congress to-
night neared its end and the usual
desperate attempt to pass eleventh
hour measures. Night sessions were
held by both senate and house. Many
bills received their death blow in the
final hours of the session, while nu-
ierous others escaped. The $395,-
000,000 navy bill appeared to be the
only regular supply which would
fail.
A SK UMER UOfTWO
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS
RESOLUTION UNITING GENERAL
AND IIONOEOPATIIIC IIOSPI
TALS PASSES hOUSE
Lansing, March 3.-The, joint reso-
lution recommending the merging of
the general and homoeopathic hospi-
tals of the University of Michigan,
which was introduced by Representa-
tive Georg Townsend of Jackson, has
been adopted by the house.
The nierger of the University and
Homoeopathic hospitals as contem-
plated in the joint resolution now be-
fore the state senate is not the first
attack which has been launched in the
state legislative halls against the
Homoeopathic hospital. Former res-
olutions have attempted to merge the
two hospitals, to remove the Homoe-
opathic hospital to Detroit, or even
to do away with the hospital entirely.
Representative Townsend is report-
ed to have said that there were but
47 patients in the Homoeopathic hos-
pital, but the records show that the

daily record of "in patients" -- those
actually in the hospital - was 126
last year. In addition 2,695 "out pa-
tients" were treated during the year.
Major Lee Inspects P. 0. T. C. Units
Maj. John C. H. Lee of the general
staff was in Ann Arbor yesterday for
the purpose of inspecting the Uni-
versity units of the R. 0. T. C. Maj.
Lee is stationed at Fort Sheridan, Illi-
nois.

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MARCH LAW REVIEW
APPEARS :SATURDAY,
The March number of the Law Re-
view will be out next Saturday, ac-
cording to Prof. Ralph W. Aigler of
the Law school. One change has:
been made in the editorial board of
the publication in the election by the
law faculty of Edwin B. Stason, '22L,
to fillthe vacancy left by F. C. Pat-
terson, '21L.
Anyone having copies of the No-
vember number of the current issue
in good condition may obtain 25 cents
apiece for them by turning them in
to the Law Review office.
GERMANYGIVEN
4 DAYSTO SIGN
Allies Announce Penalties for Failure
To Accept Terms in
Time Set
COUNTER-PROPOSALS GOT NO
CONSIDERATION-LLOYD GEORGE
(By Associated Press)
London, March 3.-Germany today
was given until Monday noon to ac-
cept the fundamental conditions laid
down by the Supreme Allied Council
at Paris. The German delegates were
informed that if Germany does not ac-
cept those terms, the Allies will take
immediate steps.
The first step will be the occupa-
tion by Allied troops of the cities of
Duisburg, Dusseldorf and Ruhrort, at
the mouth of the Ruhr, 14 miles west
of Essen.
Second, each Allied country will
place such a tax on German merchan-
dise as it may deem proper.
Third, a customs boundary along
the Rhine, under Allied control, will
be established.
Germany's counter-proposals, which
were submitted to the Allies on Tues-
day, were not susceptible of examina-
tion, Premier Lloyd - George an-
nounced.
Twenty .engineers
Get All A Grades
Twenty engineers - six seniors,
three juniors, seven sophomores and
four freshmen - are announced as
receiving all A marks for the first
semester work in the College of En-
gineering.
They are: C. H. Chen, '21E, A. M.
Courtright, '23E, Neil Crane, '23E, A.
B. Curtis, '22E, W. L. Fink, '21E, T.
R. Halman, '21E, B. F. Hausman,
'24E, R. M. Hazen, '22E, J. N. Landis,
'21E, C. C. McArthur, '24E, E. F.
Moore, '21E, L. K. Mower, '23E, W. J.
e Piper, '23E, D. C. Seitz, '23E, A. H.
t Stuart, '23E, T. C. Thompson, '24E, I.
B. Whinery, '21E, G. W. Whitney, '23E,
H. L. Wilcox, '24E, J. T. Woolfenden,
'22E.

SENIOR, JUNIOR MEN TO
MEET SUNDAY AT UNION
All senior and junior men are
requested to meet at 3:30 o'clock
Sunday afternoon in the As-
sembly hall of the Union to hear
and discuss the reports of the
various committees on student
government. .
THE STUDENT COUNCIL,
LeGrand A. Gaines, Jr.,
President.
MRS , EDDY UU UUADDE

MARTHA COOK GIRLS GIVE
OF $80 AS NUCLEUS FOR
FUND

INITIAL PUBLIC AUDIT OF MICHIGAN
UNION ACCOUNTS SHOIS NO ERDORS;
I MRE THAN 100,000 ITEMS CHECKED

SUN

President-Elect Harding Arrives in'
Washington; Approves Prepara-
tions for Inauguration;
WILSON EXPECTS TO CARRY
OUT CUSTOMARY CEREMONIES!
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 3.--After eight!
eventful years in authority, the Dem-1
ocratic administration of Woodrow
Wilson closed up its books today and
rested to await the termination of its
tenure at noon tomorrow.
While the final balance was being
struck by the outgoing officials, War-'
ren G. Harding, Republican President-
elect, came to Washington, gave his
approval to the simple inaugural cer-;
emonies which will attend his induc-
tion into office, completed formally his
cabinet and finished his part of the
inaugural preliminaries by going to
the White House for a call of cour-
tesy on Mr. Wilson.
Wilson to Practice Law
For his part, the retiring President
provided, the last of the long succes-
sion of sensations scattered through-
out his eight years in office by an-
nouncing that when he leaves the
White House he will take up the
practice of law.
Meantime in striking contract to
the usual holiday turmoil of inaugu-
ration eve, the streets of the capital
reflected only in a mild degree the
complete re-arrangement about to be
made in the national government.
Flags and bunting were broken out
in recognition of the impending event:
and tonight the dome of the capitol
was illuminated for the first time
since the celebration of the armistice,
but the small crowd which had cheer-
ed Mr. Harding in his movements
about the city had entirely stopped by,
evening.

ceremonies will be far and away the
simplest of recent years. Four troops
of cavalry will escort the President
and the President-elect to the capitol
but no parade will be permitted and
there will be little of the panoply" of
former inaugurals at the taking of the
oath on the East Portico.
Writer Throws
Searchlight On
College Lovers
Romance - the stuff of which nov-
els are written and dreams are fill-
ed - that unconsciously attracts
people to the movies, and which adds
spice to the hum-drum news which
the daily newspapers contain - is a
potential factor in the careers of
American university students. At
least, so it is claimed.
But, asks a writer who is collect-
ing data on this subject, to what ex-
tent is it true that romance affects
students only in a slight way, in the
form of flirtations which pass with
the waning of the new moon, or are
their romantic adventures lasting and
successful? The writer, who has seni
to all universities a questionnaire
with questions similar to the above,
also wishes to learn if love affairs
which begin at college have a happy
ending, or do they leave those con-
cerned with regrets and broker
hearts?
The results of this questionnaire
will be published in a magazine arti-
cle, the writer claiming that thereb3
he can put the facts in black and
white before parents. So, in order to
avoid having our personal love affairs
and adventures known to the world;
it behooves us to beware where we
keep our trysts and also to make

Announcement of a donation of $801
made by the women of Martha Cooki
building as a nucleus of the $1,700
fund, to be raised in the Dr. Clara
Sargent campaign, was given at a1
meeting of drive workers held at that
building last night. Gertrude Boggs,
'22, shairman of the drive, outlined
the plan of campaign through which
endeavor will be made to solicit every'
woman on the campus before March
12.
"As our country, which has been so
largely spared the serious effects ofa
the late war, is learning to save its1
soul by giving of itself, so will Mich-
igan benefit by giving to China," said1
Mrs. Katherine Willard Eddy, foreign4
secretary of the national Y. W. C. A.
Prof. John L. Brumm, second speak-
er at the meeting, sees in the Dr.
Sargent campaign, a challenge to the
women of Michigan to develop oppor-
tunities in broader fields, as they have
already done in the more limited1
sphere of scholastic and other Uni-
versity endeavors.
Helen Wong, '24M, brought the view'
point of a Chinese girl to the gather-
ing. "I represent the new China,
which is willing to work for her ad-
vancement," she said. "Last year, I'
heard a girl say that there was no
need helping China, because she was
hopeless. I knew that this girl did
not represent the real American view.
China is no longer backward. We are
asking that a sister republic help us
along." '
JUDGE GEORGE S.
HOSMER, '75L, DIES
Funeral services for Judge George'
S. Hosmer, '75L, of Detroit, who died
Wednesday, will be held at 2:30
o'clock this afternoon at the home in
that city. Judges of the circuit court
of Wayne county, of whom the de-
ceased was the oldest, having served
for 33 years, will take part in the
services.
Judge Hosmer, a circuit judge of
Wayne county since Jan. 1, 1888, was
the dean of the Wayne bench. He
was elected on the Democratic ticket
in the spring of 1887 and had served
the county continuously since he took
the oath of office the following Janu-
ary.
State Street Y. M. C. A. Team Wins
The State street team came off vic-
torious in the Y. M. C. A. drive for
new members, gaining 27 new mem-
bers out of a total of 55 secured. A.
D. Parker, Claude Drake and C. F.
Myers are the captains. A banquet
will be given the winners later. 1

RECEIPTS FOR 13 YEARS EXCEED
DISBURSEMENTS BY
$5,162.38
DETROIT TRUST CO.
MAKES EXAMINATION
Accountants Report System of Cross.
Entering Not Necessary; Urge
Less Bookkeeping
A total of $5,162.38 is shown to be
the amount of receipts over disburse-
ments in the general fund of the
Union after 13 years operation, ac-
cording to the "Report of Audit;" just
made by the Detroit Trust company.
This is the first public audit of the
books since 1907. Amounts still ow-
ing on fixed assets, the principal item
of which is the building, are named
as $387,189.09.
Three accountants of the public ac-
counting department of the Detroit
company did the work in seven weeks
during the latter part of last Novem-
ber and December. Their examination
included figures, of the general fund
since 1907 and the building fund since
1909, the report being made in a
bound book of 72 pages.
No Error Found
More than 100,000 items were check-
ed and not a single error was found.
Only one recommendation was made.
To be certain that no mistakes creep
in, the Union employs an intricate sys-
tem of cross-entering. The account-
ants report that such extreme care is
not necessary, and urge that the book-
keeping be reduced.
The audit covered the general and
building funds, and finds that details
of revenue and expenses in-the con-
duct of the usual activities of the
Union fall under the general fund
heading, while the building fund in-
cludes the construction of the new
building, purchaseof real estate, and
campaign expenses.
Report Written
Liabilities still existing on the
building consist of $200,000 in mort-
gages, $127,189.09 owing to the State
War Preparedness board, and $60,000
due the banks.
Part of the conclusion of the re-
sport which is written by Ralph J.
Daly, certified public accountant, and
approved by Ralph C. Miller, mana-
ger of the public accounting depart-
ment of the Detroit Trust company, is
as follows:
.Work Efficient
"We wish to express our apprecia-
tion of the general efficient work
which the Union organization has done
in the conduct of transactions through-
its business offices. The extensive
volume of clerical duties necessary for.
the collection and disbursement of
building fund items as well as the
usual operating accounting - details
have shown extreme accuracy in all
items coming under our observat on..
The entire office organization refects
a business management comparable
with the most highly commercial es-
tablishments and we feel that special
commendation is worthy of being ex-
tended.
FUNERAL OF JUDGE GRANT
IS SET FOR 2 O'CLOCK TODAY
Funeral services for Judge Claudius
B. Grant, '59, of Detroit, who passed
away last Monday -forenoon at St.
Petersburg, Fla., will be held at 2
o'clock this afternoon at St. Andrew's
church. Interment will be made in
Forest Hill cemetery. The remains
will arrive in Detroit this morning
and will be brought here directly by
special interurban car. Friends de-

siring to sent flowers are asked to
send them directly to the church.

3
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Biulletin

Bloomington, Ind., March 3.-
Purdue defeated Indiana in a
Western Conference basketball
game here last night by the score
of 28 to 29. By reason of this v-ic-
tory Purdue went into second
place in the Big Ten standing and
Indiana was retired from that po-
sition to a triple tie for third
place with Michigan and Wiscon-
sin. The game was fast and close-
ly contended all though. The score
at the end of the first half stood
at 16-14 in favor of Purdue. White
and Miller starred for the Purdue
team and for the Indiana five De-
Hority and Marxson bore the
brunt of the attack. Indiana had
many chances at the basket but
failed to make its shots count.

Ceremonies Simple sure that those to whom we tell oura
In accordance of the desire of the life secrets are not the secret report-
President-elect tomorrow's inaugural ers of some enterprising magazine.

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