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February 27, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SECTION

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ASSOCIATI
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

ONE

VOL. XXXI. No. 99. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1921. PRICE FIVE (

MICHIGAN SCORES TWO

VICTO RIE

WOLVERINES9BEAT
MIANS IN1FSTu
CONTEST,24T018
ILLINI HELD TO THREE BASKETS
BY EXCEPTIONAL
GUARDING
SENSATIONAL PLAYING
GIVES MICHIGAN WIN
Karpus Scores 10 Free Throws and
Field Goal; Three Pretty Baskets
Caged by Dunne
(Special to The Daily)
Bloomington, Ind., Feb. 26. -
Defeating the Hoosiers 26 to 17,
Iowa practically ended hfdiana's
hopes for Conference basketball
honors here tonight. The bril-
liant playing of the rejuvenated
Hawkeye five overcame al ef-
forts of the Indiana players to
snatch a victory and a chance for
the Big Ten title.
Michigan last night defeated Illi-
nois, tied with Indiana, for the lead
in the Conference, 24 to 18, in the
roughest and most brilliant basketball
game ever played on the Waterman
gymnasium floor. The Wolverines
took the lead at the start and were
never headed.
So close was the Michigan guard-
ing that Illinois, the highest scorer
of the 1921 Big Ten, was able to drop
in but three field baskets, the rest of
the points coming from the foul line.
Carney, sent into the game early in
the second half, was unable to break
through the Michigan defense with his
accustomed skill. Twenty-one fouls
were called on Michigan and 14 on
the visitors.
No Star
The Wolverines were without an
outstanding star, the entire team
playing sensational ball at all tunes.
Dunne's 3 baskets and the 12 points'
gathered by Captain Karpus, 10 from
the foul line and the rest on a field
shot, made these men the leaders in
scoring. Miller, Rea and Williams
played brilliantly on the defense, the
close guarding of the latter pair be-
ing responsible in a great measure for
the low score of the opponents. Two
men, Sabo of the Illini, and Miller of
Michigan, were put out of the game
for personal fouls.
Michigan Among Best
Except for foul goals, neither team
was able to score for the first seven
minutes when Michigan broke the ice
by virtue of Miller's two point coun-
ter. Fifteen minutes elapsed before
Vail counted the only field basket
that the Orange and Blue threw in
the initial period.Williams followed
the ball in masterly fashion and
stopped several Illinois shots after
they had left the hands of the play-
ers.
By winning this game Michigan
may be classed with the best teams
in the West. In the last five Confer-
ence games the Wolverines have been
undefeated, though numbering Chica-
go, Purdue, and Ilinois on the oppos-
ing list.
Wrestling Match Staged
Between the halves of the game a
,fast seven minute wrestling match,
between Bouchan and Gilland was
put on by the Boxing club. The men
were so evenly matched that no de-
cision was possible. The crowd, by its

attention and applause, gave evidence
of extreme interest in the mat game
(Continued on Page Eight)
THE WEATHER

Wireless Crries
Contest Reports
For probably the first time, Con-
ference student newspapers last
night made connection by wireless to
report the progress of an athletic con-
test, when Michigan joined with Pur-
due and Illinois and told them the
story of the game as it progressed.
Though Illinois was not equipped
for long distance transmission, the
powerful station at Purdue not only
took the reports from Michigan, but
also repeated the score -to Urbana.
Arrangements have been made to
handle the account of tomorrow
night's game in a similar manner. The
Purdue Exponent has stated that, if
the experiment is satisfactory tomor-
row night, it will make an effort to
secure the stories of later contests the
same way.
SCHEDULED FOR TUESDAY
PICTURES, VAUDEVILLE, MUSIC
BY UNION ORCHESTRA
ON BILL
"'The Metropolitan Movie" is the
title of the entertainment to be given
under Union auspices at 7:30 o'clock
Tuesday evening, March 1, at Hill aud-
itorium. Two vaudeville acts, a Lois
Weber feature production of the Fam-
ous Players Lasky series, and a Mack
Senhett comedy constitute the com-
bined program. Music will be furn-
ished by the Union orchestra under
the direction of Prof. Earl V. Moore.
Proceeds will be turned into the
operating fund of the Union to meet
any deficiencies which may arise. The
admission fee will be 30 cents. The
utor :91 ssuae2u'.uu no etmmoa
M. Winters, '23L, chairman, Guy Moul-
throp, '22, Venner Brace, '23, and
Walter Velde, '23.
BLANCIIARD FAVORS STATE
CONTROL OF TRUNK LINES
Due to an unfortunate error it was
stated in yesterday's Daily that Prof.
A. H. Blanchard denounced state su-
pervision of trunk lines. The state-
ment should have read that state
highways in Michigan should be con-
structed and maintained under the
control of the State Highway depart-
ment.
Professor Blanchard also claimed,
at the last session of the highway
conference, that state highways in
general should be constructed and
maintained under the sole supervision
of the State Highway department held-
responsible for their existence. He
further statedthat many trunk, high-
ways were in unsatisfactory condition
due to their supervision being placed
in the hands of county officials.

TRACK TEAMBEATS"'" Prom Overf PANAMA PREPARES CLARATIN OF
Dance''Cancelled
MARON EAIY DacxA ON COSTA RICA: WAITS ONL'
FaIlure of the necessary 200 soph-
onii res to sign up for a 'Prom over-
Chic go Snowed Under By Lop-Side!flow dInce resulted in the committee's
Score d xye r calling off all+plans- for such an af-
of Yit -1 toI f A nI-01 in u wein t i at

Thiirty-Onie

QUARTER, HALF MILE RECORDS
BROKEN BY BUTLER, BARTKEY,
(Special to The Daily)1
Chicago, Feb. 26. - Doubling the
score on their opponents, the Uni-
versity of Michigan tracksters in1
Bartlett gymnasium tonight easily de-;
feated the Chicago track team 64 to+
31.
Two Chicago track records were
broken when Butler turned the 440
in 51 4-5. Running the 880 yard run
in 1:58 2-5, Bartky of Chicago also
broke a Maroon track record.
SUMMARY
Fifty yard dash-First,rLosch (M),
second, Kelly (M), third, Murphy
(C); time-5 4-5. Pole vault-Wes-
brook (M), second, Naylor (M) and
Hall, tied; height, 11 feet. Shot put-
Won 'by Stipe (M), Tidy (M), third,
McWilliams (C); distance, 41 feet x
2 1-2 inches. Mile-Won by Krought
(C), Douglas (M), third, Kernan (C) ;
time, 4:45 1-5. Quarter-Won by
Butler (M), second, Hall (C), third,1
Everetts (C), 51 4-5 sec. Breaks track'

taire As only W0 men were in line aL
2 o'clock yesterday afternoon in Uni-
versity hall, no money was taken in,'
and the committee definitely announc-!
ed that th' project was abandoned.
When permission was, granted by
the committee on student affairs for
an overflow party, it was stated that
only sophomores could attend, and for
this reason no effort was made to
sell tickets to members of other;
classes.

SHALL WE TAP?
Ye gods! what next? The
latest" is called "tapping" at
the University of California.
Any girl appearing on the cam-
pus with too short a skirt, too
much rouge, or too many "vamp-
ish" features is tapped on the
shoulder by a member of a com-
mittee chosen for that purpose
and warned that reform is the
best policy.

LN

AST Of EXTRA SERIES
TO 'BE- GIVENMONDAY,

YORK CHAMBER
SOCIETY ON PRO-
GRAM

MUSIC

The New York Chamber Music so-I

record.
50 yard high hurdles-Won by Sarg-
ent (M), second, Hall (C), third
Cruickshank (M). Time, 7:00 sec-
onds. 50 yard low hurdles-won by
Cruikshank (M),. second Hall (C),
third, Sargent (M). Time, 6 2-5 sec-
onds. Two mile-won by Standish,
(M), second, Dooley (C), third, High-,
land (C). Time, 10:29 2-5. High
jump-won by Walkeid (M), Platts
(M), and Schneberger (C), tied for
second. Heighth, 5 feet 9 inches. Half"
mile-won by Bartkey (C). second,
Burkholder (M), third, Burns (M).
1:58 2-5. Breaks track record and
is better than Western Conference in-
door record. Relay-won by Mich-
igan (Burns, Wheeler, Douglas, and
Butler). Time 3:31.[

ciety with Carolyn Beebe as pianist
and director will give the last concert
on the Extra Concert series tomorrow
night in Hill auditorium.
.Each and every member of this
group is an artist of repute as a sol-
oist and is experienced in ensemble
routine. Because of this and because
of the conscientious , work of the
leader of the organization a program
of the first rank may be looked for.
The society consists of the follow-
ing musicians: Pierre Henrotte, vio-
lin; Paul Lemay, viola; Livio Man-
nucci, violoncello; Emil Mix, double
bass; Carolyn Beebe, piano; Georges
Grisez, clarinet; William Kincaid,
flute; Rene Corne, oboe; Ugo Savo-
lini, bassoon; Joseph Franzl, French
'horn.
The program to be provided is as
follows:
Nonetto, in F major, Opus 31.... Spohr
For violin, viola, violoncello, dou-
ble bass, flute, oboe, clarinet, bas-
soon, French horn.
Allegro
.C11hriU. Alhl U

Coy Spring Again
Proves Coquette
Spring was here!
While haberdashers and milliners
were beginning to prepare for an ear-
ly sale of straw hats and other spring
paraphernalia, and while ambitious
gardeners were consulting seed cata-
logues and the baseball men were
hoping for outdoor practice, Old Man
Weather came along and shattered
the fond hopes and plans of his help-
less mortal victims.
If Mr. Weather Man had tried twice
as hard, he could not have achieved
his purpose with more successful re-
sults. Starting with a light flurry on
Friday evening, the snow continued to
fall steadily, the instruments at the
University observatory recording a
downfall of seven inches of snow at
noon yesterday.
Reports from other cities in the
state indicate that the storm is prov-
ing more serious than in Ann Arbor,
which has not been affected as great-
ly as other sections, due to the fact
that but little wind is accompanying
the storm here. Late last night only
a light snowfall was reported, which
gives rise to the hope that Old Man
Weather may have had a change of
mind, and will return again to tease
us with fanciful delusions of le beau
printemps.
LOCAL LEGION POST FAVORS
31ILITARY COMPENSATION BILL
Official recommendation of the ad-
justed-compensation bill for ex-serv-
ice men, which is now before con-
gress, was offered by the University
post of the American legion in the
form of a telegram sent Friday to
Senators Townsend and Truman, both
from Michigan.
The text of the telegram is as fol-
lows:
"The University of Michigan post,
American Legion, respectfully urges
you to support the adjusted-compen-
sated bill for ex-service men."
CALL ISSUED FOR TRYOUTS
FOR FRESHMAN GLEE CLUB

PRESIDENT EXPECTS TO ASAl
DICTATORIAL POWERS
IMMEDIATELY
U. S. CONSIDERS STEPS
TO PREVENT STRUGG
Refuses Panama Request to Re
Guns Surrendered Several
Years Ago
BULLETIN
Panama, Feb. 26. - Hostiliti
between Panama and Costa Ri
showed possibilities today of d
veloping into a conflict involvii
all the Central American stat
and Columbia. Leading Coli
Mans residing in Panama ha
sent a wireless message aski
the Columbian government
furnish them arms against Cos
Rica.
They also asked the Columbi
government what action it wou
take against Costa Rica, which
a member of the recently form
union of American states.
Panama, Feb. 26.-It was knoi
officially tonight that Preside
Delisario Porris has signed
proclamation declaring war
Costa Rica but is holding it te:
porarily for a special session
the national assembly to confi
the declaration and confirm h
ii dictatorial powers for the d
fense of the republic. He is
sured&the entire country is behi
him.
The threatened region is I
scene of hurried preparations
repel an invasion and every ava
able rifle in the country is bei
pressed into service.. The sho
age of arms presents an extrem
ly serious difficulty.

i

j tcnerzo: Negro
Purdue Wrestlers Defeat Purple nale: Vivace
Purdue defeated Northwestern last Suite in C, opus 6.... Eugene Goossens
night in a wrestling contest held at For piano, flute, violin.
Lafayette by a score of 30 to 12, ac- ( Impromptu: Moderato e espres-
cording to a radio message received at sivo
the University station last night. Serenade: Andante grazioso

Purdue Returns to First Place I
Evanston, Feb. 26.-Purdue went
into a triple tie for first place with
Illinois and Indiana in Western Con-
ference basketball by defeating North-
western here tonight 24 to 15.
Wisconsin Defeats Chicago
Madison, Feb. 26.-Wisconsin de-
feated the Chicago basketbal Rteam
by the score of 25 to 19.

Divertimento: Allegro giososo
Suite, Through the Looking Glass,
Op. 12...........Deems Taylor
For piano, violin, viola, violoncello,
double bass, flute, clarinet, oboe,
bassoon, French horn.
PRESIDENT BURTON LEAVES
FOR ATLANTIC CITY MEET

Will Address National Conference
Future of Educa-
tion

on

Editors hacking Amplification Of
Journalism Work Are Leading Hen

(By Associated Press)
Washington, Feb. 26.-Faced
the seriousness ofthe situation o
als of the state department began
night consideration of steps to tal
case it should be necessary to atte
to avert war between Panama
Costa Rica.
Official confirmation that Presi
Porris has .gone so far as to sig
declaration of war was yet lac
and from Costa Rica no informa
had been received, notwithstan
an inquiry to the American lega
The obvious remedy offered of I
ing American troops to avert a- c
was dismissed by those who be
both governments could be induct
listen to friendly counsel, and if
to issue a stern warning that i:
vention would stop the troubles.
The information received by the
partment continued to be practi
the same as that contained in ,
dispatches. The request of the
ama government for aid in recov
the guns surrendered many years
to the United' States authorities
not be complied with, it was said
the reason that they long ago
disposed of and the money rett
to Panama. The United States it
also said, was not eager to assi
apning the Panamanians since
would enable them to bring abou
precise situation the departmei
anxious to avert.
Stylus to Hold Meeting Tues(
Stylus will hold a meeting at
o'clock Tuesday evening in New
residence.

Those editors throughout the state,
who are presenting a request for the
amplification of the work in journal-
ism at the University to the Board of
Regents at their next meeting, typify
the class of newspaper men who are
foremost in their profession, accord-
ing to a statement of Prof. John L.
Brumm, of the rhetoric department,
given yesterday.
"Their opinion regarding the pres-
ent courses and needs is the opinion;
of men who are recognized by people
[in their own occupation. And their

make any proposed change effective
and .conducive to better instruction
in journalism is one that means
much," said Professor Brumm.
Twenty-one editors and writers
were present at the recent meeting in
Detroit, where a recommendation was
unanimously adopted to be presented
to the Regents, favoring the exten-
sion of the courses in journalism to
the end that a separate department
be formed and later the possible eleva-
tion of that department into a sep-
arate school, co-ordinate with the sev-
eral other professional schools at the
University.

President Marion L. Burton and Mrs.
Burton left yesterday afternoon for
Atlantic City where the President will
attend the conference of the national
Education association. He will deliv-
er an address on "The Probable Future
of Education in the United States; Its
Policies and Programs," before the
session on Tuesday.
Residents of the state of Michigan
and University alumni who are in At-
lantic City will give a banquet in hon-
or of President Burton and Mrs. Bur-
ton at the Hotel Breakers on Mon-
day night.F
President Burton will deliver an ad-
dress Wednesday night at a banquet
of University alumni in Philadelphia
and will return to Ann Arbor Thurs-
day or Friday.

With the view of ineicasing the per-
sonnel of the Freshman Glee club to
100 members, Frank L. Thomas, lead-
er of the organization, has issued a
call for 15 freshmen interested in the
work.
It is requested that all men desiring
to try out for the club report at Mr.
Thomas' studio in the School of Music,
where they will be given an interview
and an opportunity to try out. The
club will hold its first rehearsal at
7:15 o'clock Thursday, March 3, in,
the main reading room of the Union.

Generally Fair; Rising Temperature promise of co-operation in order to

------------------------------------------------------------

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