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February 26, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEATHER
LED; PROBABLY
OR RAIN TODAY

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DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

XXXI. No 98. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1921. PRICE FIVE

COAL :MEN REDU CED",
OUTPUT TO BOOST
226 INDICTED BY GRAND JURY
- -IN INVESTIGKTION BY
GOVERNMENT
OPERATORS CONSPIRED
WITH MINERS, CLAIM
Each Agreed to Aid Other in Raising
Wages and Profits, 18 Month
Research Shows I
IndIanapolis, Feb. 25.-Co-operation
between op rators aid minors in six
states forced higher /prices for soft
coal by restrictink production,'"it was
charged today iby a federal grand jury
indictment returned in court here.
Two hundred 'and twenty-six defend-
ants, Including 127 operators and min-
ers and 99 operators, associations or
companies were accused of conspir-
acy under the. Sherman anti-trust law.
The defendants live in Missouri, Illi-
nois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and
Pennsylvania.
Arraignment May 3
Judge A, E. Anderson who received
the indictment set May 3 for arraign-
ment and in issuing writ* for arrests
of the defendants he fixed the bond of
each at $10,000. Names of all defend-
ants, except 12, were made puybic
District Attorney Vannuis.
Prominent operators, inicl i ig
Thomas T. Brewster, Edward Carl
Fearls, Jackson Derring, Will Tenna,
and William K. Cavanaugh, and high
officials of the United Mine Workers
Union, including its president, John
L. Lewis, and its secretary, William
Green, were among te defendants.
The national coal association was
among the corporate defendants.
I'vestigatod 18 Months #,
i The indictment covered specifically
the last three years in the coal in-
dustry and followed an investigation
that has been cpnducted almost con-
tinuously the last 18 months by
agents of the federal department of
justice.
The charge is made by the indict-
ment that at various joint conferences
the miners and operators agreed to be
partners .in mining and distributing
coal, and that they would aid one an-
other in plans to increase wages, in-
crease prices, create a shortage Land
otherwise limit production and dis-
tribution. Creation of fctitious mark-
et prices and the provocation of min-
ers strikes by operators also was'
charged by the indictment.
Charge Agreement,
The charge is made that the agree-
ment entered into between the oper-
ators and miners provided that coal
should not be sold at any time for a
price that did not yield a profit to
the operators; that the increases of
wages to the miners should be added
to the price of coal; that competition
among operators should be eliminat-
ed; that no coal be sold below the
cost of production and that the means
of increasing cost and production in
the price of coal should be by clos-
lng and keeing idle the mines.
The operators established a uniform
cost accounting system for the opera-
tion of the mines, it is charged, and by
agreement employed a greater num-
ber of miners than was reasonably
necessary to operate the mines prop-
erly.

SCHOOL Of'MUS
GIE RE ITAL TOMORROW
Albert Lockwood, pianist, and the
University Symphony orchestra will
contribute the next program in the
series of complimentary recitals by
the University School of Music at 3
o'clock tomorrow afternoon in Hill
auditorium.
The program includes Liszt's popu-,
lar "Second Hungarian Rhapsody,"
which has never been heard in Ann
Arbor in its brilliant orchestra tran-
soription by Mueller-Berghaus, and
also the "Rhapsodie d'Auvergne" by
Saint-Saens. This piece is built up-;
on the folk tunes of the Auvergne,
mountains of Central Southern France.
Other numbers are the "Todtentanz"
of Liszt and Schubert's "Unfinished

S.n C A. Requests Campus Opinion
On Proposed Charter A nd By-Laws

In pursuance of a policy to secure
campus opinion in regard to the pro-
posed charter and by-laws of the Stu-
dents' Christiap association, the offi-
cials of the organization have pub-
lished them in this issue of The
Daily. They may be found on page
four.
The publication of the charter and
by-laws recently adopted by the board
of trustees of the association is the
direct result o a meeting of, members
of the association held last Thursday
afternoon at Lane hall, where a mo-
tion was passed requesting that this
action be taken before the papers
OFFER JOURNALISMr
PLAN TO0 REGENTS
State Newspaper Men Recommend tle
Amplification oi Courses to
Form Department
FACULTY REPRESENTED AT
IMPORTANT DETROIT MEETING
Develoment of ,the present courses
in journalism into a department of
the literary college. with the possi-
bility of a separte schodl of jour-
nailsm, was urged in a recommenda-
tion made to the board of Regents by
a representative body of state news-
paper men, meeting at Detroit yester-
day.
The resolution, which is in the form
of a request addressed to the Re-
gents, states that tlhe editors pledge
their hearty co-operation toward the
amplification of the work in journal-
ism. The meeting was attended by
Dean John R. Effinger, of the literary
college, Prof. F. N. Scott and Prof.
John L. Brumm, of the rhetoric de-
partment. President Marion L. Bur-
ton, who was to attend, found it im-
possible to do so.
Possibilities Considered
The proposal as drawn up states
that the general subject of the teach-
ing of journalism has been discussed
with those at the University wo have
it under their direction. It contin-
ues: "We, the undersigned repyesen-
tatives of the press of Michigan, re-
spectfully request your honorable
body to consider the matter' of am-
plification of the teaching of journal-
ism at the University. We would in-
vite .your attention in particular to
two aspects of this matter: First, the
desirability of developing these cours-1
es into a department of the College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts; see-
and,,the possible elevation of the de-
(Continued on Page Six)
Tike aleTor
PFrom Overflow
Set For Today
Permission for a Sophomore Prom
overflow dance to be given in Bar-
bour gymnasium was given by the
committee on student affairs -yester-
day afternoon, and the committee has
formulated tentative plans for the af-
fair, which will be given providing'
that 200 sophomores purchase tickets
this afternoon.
At 2 o'clock today in the main cor-
ridor of University hall sophomores
wil be given a chance to secure the
tickets, which will be sold at $5. If
the total of 200 is not sold, the money
will be refunded to the buyers and
the overflow party called off.
"If the many sophomores who were

disappointed in securing - ticjets - to
the Prom sign up for the overflow,
dance, the committee will make every
effort to make the Barbour gym party
the equal of the Prom," said L. Per-
kins Bull, '23, chairman. "At this late
date it will be impossible to have all
the features for the overflow dance
that are planned for tle Prom, but they
committee will endeavor to duplicate
the dance at the Union as far as pos-
sible."
The overflow dance will have no
effect upon the Sophoomre Prom, the
two dances <being entirely separate,
although conducted at the same time
and by the same committee. The
ticket sale this afternoon will be reg
ulated the sdme as was the Prom
sale, sophomores only being allowed
to secure ticke'ts.

were filed at Lansing. The request
was promptly complied with.
Friction Caused
Recetly there has been some fric-
tion over the charter among members
of the association. The plan is to
carry on the work of the Y. W. C. A.
as a segment of ale S. C. A., and since
the board of trustees of this %body
consists of 18 men and 5 women, the
latter are protesting over the ar-
rangement. It is also said that the
aims of the two organizations are
rather different.
On the other hand under the old
charter, student members df the asso-
ciation were allowed no power what-
ever, since the board of trustees held
full control. It is claimed that the
anew charter will better these condi-
tions.
Both Sides Want Comments
However, it is the desire of both
supporters and opponents of the proj-
ect to secure the opinion of the cam-
pus in this matter, and to this end it
is requested that opinions and sug-
gestions be mailed either to C. Stew-
art Baxter, '21, president of the S. C.
A., or tohLois, B. DeVries, '21, presi-
dent of the Y. W. C. A.
DETROITU. Of M. CLUB
CONGRATULATES DENBY
SENDS RESOLUTIONS OF PRAISE
4 TO NEW SECRETARY OF
NAVY
- . ,
(Special to The Daily)
Detroit, Feb. 2.-Rousing cheers
greeted resolutions of congratulation
to' Edwin Denby at the University of
Michigan club of Detroit meeting in
the Cadilla hotel Thursday noon. The
occasion was the appointment of Ma-
jor Denby as secretary of the navy.
The resolutions were drawn up and
presented by United States Customs
Appraiser Robert H. Clancy and Ned
Denby's old football days as one of
Michigan's great centers 'was empha-
sized.
Resolutons Made
The rsolutions are as follows:
"Resolved-That the University of
Michigan club of Detroit tender most
hearty and sincere congratulations to
one of its most loyal and prominent
members, Major Edwin Denby, upon
his appointment as secretary of the
navy; that ths club views with great
satisfaction the elevation to the Pres-
ident's cabinet of a man who has serv-'
ea soi well the University of Michigan
in so many activities and who first
demonstrated remarkable capacity for
devotion and discipline as football
center on the Maize and Blue's foot-
ball team; and that we assure our
respected and beloved friend and
brother that our heartfelt wishes for
his success and well-being will attend
him throughout his career."
Navy Man Gives Talk
Lieut. Com. C. L. Webster. delivered
a vivid and interesting account of his
sesvice in the submarine zone during
the war.
Varsity Wins
Hockey Mtatch
Clever combination play and close
checking by the Michigan defense
proved the undoing of the Varsity-
News, hockey team of Detroit last
night at the Coliseum, and the visit-
ing team succumbed to the Maize and'
Blue squad by a 5 to 1 score. The
game lacked the speed and dash dis-
played in other tilts seen here this

winter, due largely to the fact that
the Wolverines were never forced to
extend themselves and were appar-
ently able to score at will. Since the
Detroit aggregation has won its last
five games played and holds second
place in the Detroit hockey league, it
would seem to indicate that the brand
(Continued on Page Six)

BIG TEN EDITORS
MUCH IN FAVOR OF
ANNUAL MEETING
INTERCHANGE OF JOURNALISTIC
IDEAS PURPOSE OF AS
SOCIATION
ANN ARBOR PROPOSED
FOR FIRST CONVENTION
Plans Provide for Delegates 'from All
Campus Publications to Discuss
Common Problems
Aiming to form a Conference Edi-
torial association which will create a
better understanding between Big Ten
schools and provide interchange of
journalistic ideas, The Daily 'has writ-
,ten editors of the various publications
at each university proposing the
scheme and inviting them to Ann Ar-
bor for the first convention, to be
held this spring. Favorable replies
have been received from seven of the
nine schools addressed.
To Consider Vital Interests
The association would call together
every year the editors of all college
publications-news, opinion, literary,
and humorous. Common, interests
of the universities would be discuss-
ed, newspaper methods brought up,
and many burning topics of the day in
intercollegiate circles argued out
around the council table. Among
these would be such questions as the
present scramble for athletes, the hon-
or system, student government, col-
lege morals, unions, and professional
football.
Though plans for the convention
have not reached the point of setting
a date, suggestions from a number of
schools make it apparent that the
most fqvorable time would be late in
the spiing, preferably the last part
of May or early June, in order to give
time to the editors for next year who
would attend the meeting. a
Seven Colleges Affirm Idea
The college papers whose editors
replied favoring the idea and promis-
ing co-operation are the Daily Ohio
State Lantern, the Minnesota Daily,
the Purdue Exponent, the Daily Illini,
the Daily Iowan, the Daily Maroon,
and the Daily Northwestern. Those
not yet heard from are the Indiana
Daily Student and the Wisccnsin Daily
Cardinal.
0RI9iNAL NEW YORK PLAY
PICURES ARE RiCEITED
"BUNTY PULLS THE STRINGS,"
SUCCESSES RECALLED BY
FLASHLIGHTS
Three large flashlight pictures of
the original New York productions of
"Bunty Pulls the Strings," have just
been received from New York by
Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, of the Eng-
lish department, director of the Com-
edy club production of that play.
They recall the sensational success
of this quaint Scotch comedy upon its
first introduction to an American audi-
ence. At the Haymarket theater in
London it scored in a way that set all
England talking about it, but Amer-
ican producers hesitated to risk such
a novelty before an American audi-
ence. It was Lee Shubert and W. A.

Brady who recognized it as an Am-.
erican attraction.
Actors Inexperienced
As the original company of Scotch
actors could not be secured for an
American tour, another company was
organized for the venture. Molly
Pearson, whose work was a feature in
"Lassie," the Scotch opera of the pres-
ent season, was the original Amer-
ican Bunty. Graham Moffat, the au-
thor, had his mother play a part. None
of the actors were well known or
largely experienced, but the quality
of the play made it a success. The
Theater magazine for November, 1911,
comments as follows:
"It scored both as a piece and by
its execution one of the most sensa-
tional successes of recent years. Such
notices as appeared in the press on
the following day were a revelation
as far as praise and appreciation were
concerned. The second night, always
a critical one for a new production,
(Continued on Page Six)

'Ensian Final '
Order IDate Set
To avoid a repetition of labor trou-
bles which delayed the appearance of
the 1920 year book, the business de-
partment, of the 1921 Michiganensian
announces that all orders for copies
of the book' must be turned in be-
fore Wednesday evening, March 2.
Editorial copy and other material
will be sent to the printers on that
date, and it is important that all in-
tending to subscribe for the book do
so before then. The three day cam-
paign for 500 additional subscriptions,
which commences Feb. 28, will be the
last chance to secure the book.
'EC
A O C.L

'ON WARNElD LS
NUMBER OVER

l1$0

BEING CONSIDERED
HOME, TO APPEAR I
FORE DEAN

National Business Men Secured
Addresses en Subjects Vital
to Students

for

EDMUND D. FISHER, DETROIT
BANKER, FIRST OF SPEAKERS
Five speakers with acknowledged
reputations of success in various
business enterprisesahave been secur-
ed by the Commerce club to come
here to address members and the
student body. Governor Groesbeck,
Norval A. Hawkins, former manager
of sales of the Ford Motor company
F41mund D. Fisher, vice-president of
the Bank of Detroit, J. U. Sweeney,
'03L, of Detroit, secretary of the As-
sociated Employers' association,*'and
C. lyl. Jickling, '17 of Detroit, editor:
of "The Buick .Weekly" and other
publications, have accepted invitations
to talk.
. Practical Service, Club's Aim
Tihs speakers' program is a part
of the plan of the Commerce club to
be of practical service to its mem-
bers and to the student body. The
talks will be given a t intervals of
several weeks. Some will be for mem-
bers only and others for the entire
student body. The Groesbeck . nd
Hawkins lectures will be open to all
students. Admission to other talks
will be only upon presentation of a
club membership card.,
Edmund D. Fisher speaks on the
subject, "Banking and Foreign
Trade," at 8 o'clock Tuesday even-
ing, March 1, in Natural Science audi-
torium. As vice-president of the Bank
of Detroit, member of the Permanent
Group on Paraguay and a member of
the Inter--American High commission,
he is said to be an authority on bank-
ing. Only Commerce club members
will be admitted. Memberships, how-
ever, can still be obtained for $1 at
the office of the club, 11 Natural Sci-
ence building.
Dinner to Honor Mr. Fisher
A dinner in honor of Mr. Fisher
will be given at 6:15 o'clock next
Tuesday evening, and on account of
the limited number of tickets, those
who wish to attend are urged to make
arrangements at the Commerce club's}
office at once.

WILL BE NOTIFIED MOP
ON RECEIPT OF GRAI
Figure Not Large in Proportio
Enrollment in Literary
Colleie
Nine hundred and fifty-two
dents have been placed on the hi
probation, and warned lists, ac
ing to a statement made yesterday
ernoon by Registrar Arthur G.
The above figure is in proportik
the number of students enrolle
the literary college and is not o.
large. The majority of student
the lists are in the .freshman
sophomore classes.
Of the 952 students 180 have'
summoned to appear before Dean
R. Effinger to give reason why
should not be dismissed from the
versity. The students in the a
cases are those whose work is
poor a nature that they are being
sidered for the home list.
Four hundred and eighty-three
dents have been placed on the p:
tion. list and 285 on the warned
Foir students withdrew from the
iversity before any hction was t
on their scholastic work. Beside
students on the above list 85 o
are being considered, their grade
some cases, having not yet been
ported.
One hundred and twenty-seven
been removed from the warned
probation lists. All students on
lists will be notified upon recei
their grades Monday of the a
taken.
STATE -ENATORS
INSPECT CAMP
An inspection of University b
ings was made yesterday by the
tire finanace and appropriations
mittee of the senate of the state
islature. The seven members s
the day in conference with Pres
Marion L. Burton and in g
through the University hosp
Dental building, Medical bull
Museum, University hall and the
gineering building. A conference
held in the afternoon on matte:
connection with the University
get now before the legislature.
senators were guests of Pres
Burton at luncheon in the Unio
noon.
The members who were here Nv
Chairman Roy Clark, Eau Claire
thur E. Wood, Detroit;' Bayard
Davis, Lawton; Ernest G. 'Br
Sand Creek; Burney E. Brower,.d
son; Frank H. Vandenboom,
quette; and Charles A. Sink, Am
bor.

HIGdHWAY ENsINEERING CONFERENCE COMES, TO
Addr esses by A. H. Hlinkle and Prof.1 systemn of Indiana highways wei

Blanchard Arouse Interest

With the Friday morning session
the seventh annual conferen'ce on
highway engineering and highway
transport came to an end. The last
meeting of the conference was char-
acterized by interest and enthusiasm,
the climax coming after a speech by
A. H. Hinkle, chief engineer of main-
tenance of the Indiana state highway
department.
In Mr. Hinkle's speech he minutely
outlined the maintenance organization
under his direction in the state of In-
diana. Road organization officials
should be free from all political in-
terference, was his opinion.
"Some Red Tape Necessary"
In stating his conviction he said
"Organizations must be free from all
useless red tape. , Some red tape is
necessary, but this should be made as
simple as possible. If a simple defi-
nite report were required from each
employe, dishonesty and padded pay-
rolls would be rapidly diminished."
A map of the state was then project-
ed on the screen and the extent and

plained, Over 3,300 miles of highw
are under the supervision of
maintenance division of the Indi
state highway department.
Immediately following Mr. Hink
talk Professor Blanchard, respond
to a remark by a member of tIe c
vention, denounced state supervis
of trunk lines. His contention
that trunk lines should be mainta
ed. and kept up by the organizal
responsible for their construct
"County officials are continually bu
ing the state and as long as this c
tinues, little real progress can be
complished,' 'he stated.
Discussion Held Over
Exception was taken to Proses
Blanchard's remark and open disc
sion followed until Professor Blat
ard, as chairman of the meeting; :
ed that this question should
brought up a t the 1922 conference
Total enrollment for the confere
numbered 279, exceeding last ye
record by over 100 delegates. Accc
ing to the opinions of several d
gates interviewed, the, 1921 con
ence was successful in e very way

Blulletin

When this issue went to press
at a late hour last night no word
had beep received from the Mich-
igan swimming team concerning
the result of the meet with the
Cleveland Y. I. C. A. which took
place last night in that city.
I.

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