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February 24, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.._:.

THE WEATHER
GENERALLY FAIR

r 3k Ak

4I ahtu

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
D~AY AND I) GH'TVIRE
SERVICE

TODAY

PRICE FIVE C

VOL. XXXI. No. 96.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1921.

PRICE FIVE C:

JAPAN'S MADT
OVER ISLAND OF
COLBY NOTE SAYS U. S. NEVER
CONSENTED TO GRANT
BY LEAGUE ,

New Type Of Opera To te Presented J9J[ MANNED 10
For Play, " Top o' Th' 7lornin"[DINGS

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CLAIMS POSSESSION
VALUABLE CABLE
Action on Matter Delayed for
tation; May Be Referred
Supreme Council

IS
POST
Consul-
to

Different in locale, characters and
atmosphere from any previous Union
opera is "Top o' th' Mornin'," the
1921 Irish musical comic opera fan-
tasy. It was decided last year to
produce something in 1921 altogether
unlike "George Did It," and Russell
Barnes, '20, author of the 1920 opera,
set to work to combine Irish wit and
humor with American ingenuity. He
believed that he could obtain the
proper atmosphere and colorful back-
ground by using Irish and American
characters.
He commenced writing the book
and lyrics for "Top o' th' Mornin' "
shortly after finishing "George Did
It," and by June 1 of last year had
handed in the complete first act and
the scenario for the second act. Three
other writers submitted operas but
Barnes' was easily the best.
SEN-B ARK HO SE
O fF CABINET LIST

}

A total of 52 characters will be * .i i.-a-..- s - - - -a-- - -a -
used. There are 12 speaking parts,
and 40 in the chorus, of which 24 Will Appear Tonight, Giving Excerpts
have girl parts and 16 are men. From Her Eighth Series of
All music has been accepted for this P resentaitions
year's opera, and most of the num-
bers have been returned by the Cin- READER HAS INTERPRETED
cinnati orchestrators with complete PLAYS ON TWO CONTINENTS
orchestrations. "The music is the
best since I have been here," was the Members of the University will be
comment of E Mortimer Shuter, opera given an opportunity to hear one of3

AVENUES OF LIFE,
SAYS DEOFIELO
FORMER SECRETARY OF COM-
MERCE ENUMERATES BENE-
FITS OF GOOD ROADS
IMPROVEMENT GIVEN AS

(By Associated Press) I
Paris, Feb. 23. - The Americanb
note respecting mandates occupied thet
council of the League of Nations o
throughout the day. The note wasE
discussed in the strictest privacy and-
the council decided this evening to is-
sue only a brief summary for publi-
cation.
The note deals specifically with the
mandate attributed to the emperor of
Japan over all former German islands1
in the Pacific north of the equator,
and calls attention to the fact that
the United States government has
never gvien its consent that the Is-
land of Yap be included in the terri-
tory under Japanese mandates. The
reservation is taken on the grounda
that Yap has a very important bear-
ing on the matter of cable communi-
cation and that no power can limit
or control the use of the island.
The United States declares itself
not bound by the terms of- the man-i
date and asked that the question be
submitted to a new investigation.
Members of the council consider itf
necessary to confer with their gov-
ernments regarding the Americanf
note, and with this in view they for-t
warded the text today. It is there-1
fore considered unlikely that any de-g
cision will be reached at this session.t
It was suggested this afternoon that
the whole matter be referred to theg
Supreme council as it is declared thatg
it was in reality that body which at-,
tributed Yap, along with othert
Northern Pacific islands, to Japan, and
this was the principal point raised in
Secretary Colby's note.
Further than this it is expected thati
the council will merely acknowledge
receipt of the note.
WEATHERBEE WILL
PLAY FOR PROM'
Nobe Weatherbee's ten-piece orches-
tra has been engaged to play for the
Sophomore Prom which will be held
March 11 at the Union. Tickets are
to be placed on sale for $5 at 4:30
o'clock this afternoon at the ticket
desk in the Union lobby. Every pre-
caution is to be taken to insure the
distribution of tickets among sopho-
mores only.
Payment of dues is necessary before
a ticket can be secured, and applic-
ants who have not paid up may do so
at the time of purc'hasing the ticket.
Only 215 tickets are to be sold-for the
Prom, and they will be sold to the
first sophomores who come this after-
noon.
According to the chairman, L. Per-
kins Bull, '23, both tuxedos and full
evening dress will be worn.
,-ENGINEERS MEET FRIDAY
FOR FORMAL DINNER-DANCE
Junior engineers will have their
formal dinner-dance this Friday even-
ing at the Union. Tickets will be on
sale until 10 o'clock Thursday even-
ing. Parties desiring tables may
make reservations for four couples
by calling A. B. Evans, chairman of
the social committee at 2642-R.
Music during the dinner will be
furnished by the Michigan Union,
from 7 to 9 o'clock. Immediately fol-
lowing the dinner, dancing will be
held in the assembly hall. The social
committee announces that corsages
are banned.

Michligain Graduate Provides
Surprise Among Appoint-
ments

Real

ALL BUT THREE OF CABINET
APPOINTEES hAVE ACCEPTED)
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Feb. 23. - With for-
mal acceptances received from all but
three of the men chosen by President-
elect Harding for his cabinet, it is
prictically certain that the men chos-
en will all assume their respective
duties March 4. Edwin Denby, Mr.
Harding's choice for the secretary of
the navy, the real surprise of the
choices, as his name had not been
mentioned in connection with a cab-
inet position, is on his way for a con-
ference with the President-elect,
which is expected -to seal his appoint-
ment.
Was Detroit Lawyer
Mr. Denby, a graduate of the Uni-
versity of Michigan, law '96, was born
in Evansville, Ind., Feb. 18, 1870, and
received his early education in the
Evansville high school. He began his
practice of law in Detroit with the
firm of Keena and Lightner. His prac-
tice was interrupted by the outbreak
of tha Spanish-American war, during
which he served as a third gunner's
mate on the gunboat, Yosemite.
In t902 he was elected to the Mich-
igan legislature and in 1904 to con-
gress, serving three terms. He then
resumed his practice of law and be-
came interested in the manufacture
of motor trucks. When the United
States entered the war against Ger-
many in 1917, Denby, then 47 years
old, enlisted as a private in the Ma-
rine corps and later rose to the rank
of major. Denby Is an Episcopalian,
a Mason and a member of several
clubs in Detroit.
Cabinet Choices
The other choices for the cabinet
follow:
Secretary of state-Charles Evans
Hughes, New York.
Secretary of the treasury-Andrew
Mellon, Pennsylvania.
Secretary of war-John W. Weeks
Massachusetts.
AtTorney general-Harry M. Daugh
erty, Ohio.
Postmaster general-Will H. Hays
Indiana.
Secretary of the navy-Edwin Den
by, Michigan. -
Secretary of interior-A. B. Fall
New Mexico.
Secretary of agriculture-Henry C
Wallace, Iowa.
Secretary of commerce - Herber
Hoover, California.
Secretary of labor-James J. Davis
Pennsylvania.
ADDITION TO MEDIC BUILDING
IS PRACTICALLY COMPLETE]
Work on the new addition to th
Medical building is practically com
completed, according to an announce
ment by C. E. Pardon, superintenden
of the buildings and grounds depart
ment. This addition, which provide
for a dissecting laboratory and a ba
teriological laboratory, will accomm
date approximately 80 students.

director, yesterday.
Scenery will be more elaborate than
ever before. Tableau curtains which
were supplied last year by Beaumont
of New York will be new and original
this year. Carl Bromel, the designer,
has supervision of the Michigan
Union Construction company, who are
now building the scenery in the work-
shop. This organization constructed
the scenery for "George Did It" and
"Come On, Dad."
Costumes will be obtained from
VanHorn and Son of Philadelphia,]
who have furnished them for the last
three Union operas.
Rehearsals of both the chorus and
the cast have been in progress at the
workshop for more than a week.
Second choices for parts are already
being called upon because of first
choices becoming ineligible.
COMEDY C1UB WORKS
FOR STAGEPERFECTION
"BUNTY PULLS THE STRINGS" TO
HAE ELABORATE COSTUMES,
SETTINGS
During the interval between sem-
esters, the Comedy club has been
working to perfect arrangements for
its play, "Bunty Pulls the Strings,"
to be given Wednesday, March 9, at the
Whitney theater
This year the club has made an ef-
fort to have more elaborate scenic
effects than usual. Two new stage
settings have been designed by the di-
rector, Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, of the
English department, and painted by
0. S. Davis, of Detroit. The church at
Lintihaugh, which forms one of the
striking features of the second act,
was designed for the club by Prof. C.
D. Loomis, of the architectural de-
partment. Having spent the past sum-
mer in Scotland, Professor Loomis
was particularly well fitted to suggest
the necessary type of stage setting.
The costumes are being made in
New York and are of the picturesque
crinolinesperiod of sixty years ago.
Well known campus talent is in the
cast and rehearsals have been con-
ducted daily for the past four weeks
Yesterday three rehearsals were held
the cast working at intervals for more
than six hours. 'With still more in-
tensive rehearsals ahead, a finished
production may be expected.
GREEK CHURCHMAN
LECTURES FRIDAY
"The Reconstruction of Europe" i
the subject of the lecture to be give
by the Right Reverend Bishop Nich
olai, head of the Greek Orthodo
. church of Serbia, at 8 o'clock Frida
evening in Natural Science auditor
- ium.
Bishop Nicholai is president of th
, Serbian Child Welfare association am
one of the distinguished men of th
- present day. He has spoken befor
large gatherings throughout the world
, recently appearing at Westminster Ab
bey at London. The lecture is unde
the direction of the Cosmopolita:
club.
.t
, bulletin
(Special to The Daily)
Lansing, Feb ;23. - Unver-
D sity of MIchigan beat Michigan

Agricultural college 17 to 10 in
e basketball here tonight. Karpus
- made nine free throws. Miller,
a-I Whitlock, and Rea each made one
it field goal. Gilkey made one field
- goal for 31. A. C.. The rest of Ag-
s gies' scores were free throws.
- Michigan outclassed opponents at
D all times. Michigan made 14 per-
sonal fouls and M. A. C. 9.

the leading professional readers of
the day when Jane Manner will ap-
pear this evening in Hill auditorium,
under the auspices of the Oratorical
association. Jane Manner entered up-
on her profession of interpreter of lit-
erature after her graduation from the
University of Cincinnati and since
then has done extensive traveling
throughout this country and Europe, I
where she has met with the approval
of critics wherever she has perform-
ed. Thus far Miss Manner has com-
pleted seven series of readings which
she began in 1914 ,and this evening
she will give selections from the
eighth series.
According to Miss Manner the, best!
way to become acquainted with a play
is through the interpretation of the
professional reader. The material is
thus condensed to such an extent that
only the finer qualities of the play
are brought out and the audience is
seldom bored by any dull or uninter-
esting passages that might occur in
the play.
The program this evening will fill
the vacancy caused by the death of
Leland Powers, who was to have spok-
en here on Dec. 18. Tickets for that
date will be accepted this evening.
'ENSIAN TO RE-OPEN
SUBSCRIPTION DRIV

VICTOR C. VAUGHAN WHO RESIGN-'
ed After Serving 45 Years on the
Medical Faculty.
FEBURYSES
FEATRESCRITICS
EXPRESSION OF CAMPUS OPINION
ON LITERARY COLLEGE IS
PREDOMINANT
(By L. M. W.) '
Recognizing that one man's ideas
seldom carry the same weight as the
properly collected and interpreted1
thought of a group, Chimes has at-
tempted in the February issue, which
went on sale Wednesday, to secure a
really representative' expression of
opinion on the literary college The
opening article, "A Brief Slant at the
Lit School," is made up of pieces of
frank criticism arranged in a coher-
ent whole which makes an exceeding-
ly interesting piece of reading
It may be complained with juktice
that practically all the criticism is
, contra, and very little pro. But the
constructive idea back of the article is
to point out the wrongs, imaginary or
real, which students see in present
teaching methods, and thereby to
make plain the need for remedy; there
is hardly a place for praise in such a
program. .
Among the other special articles of
the issue, Katharine Holland Brown's
"The Short Story of Today," and Dean
Victor C Vaughan's "The Medic," take
first place. Athletics are given prom-
inence in writeups of "The Intramural
Idea," by Director Elmer D. Mitchell,
and of hockey, by James Hume, '23.
The conclusion of Laurence La
Tourette Driggs' "Keeping Watch Be-
low," signalizes the completion of a
real literary triumph for Chimes. Fic-
tion from the campus is well repre-
sented by the third prize story in the
recent contest, Mildred Barton's "But-
terfly of Happiness." Business admin-
istration students were doubtless at-
tracted by the title, "Is There a Chance
in South America?" on an article of
George E. Sloan's based on personal
contact with the continent to the south
of us.

CONFERENCE PURPOSE
Civilization of Nation Measured by
Highways, Declares
Burton
"The highway movement interests
me because it brings to the obsolete
an abundance of life; because by
bringing the open road to every man's
door it also brings truth and sun-
light," said William C. Redfield, for-
mer secretary of commerce of the
United States, before the highway
conference last night in Hill audi-
torium.
"We are importing thousands of
eggs from China. You have perhaps
taken part in the campaign to relieve
suffering in that country. Yet the
eggs cannot be used for relief be-
cause there are no roads. I shall
never forget a practical illustration
which I saw in the same state and in
the same hour," said the former secre-
tary of commerce. "I came upon a
farmer with one bale of cotton in a
wagon drawn by four horses, his
wheels in the mud up to the hubs.
Farther on I saw a farmer with five
bales of cotton in a wagon drawn by
two horses on a hard surfaced road.
When will Americans wake up to the
fact that economy is not the stopping
of necessary expenditures? Wise ex-
penditures is economy."
He then described the development
of transportation in the United States
from the waterway to the railroad and
thence to the highway.
Highways Important
President Marion L. Burton in in-
, troducing Mr. Redfield emphasized the
importance of highways. "You can
measure the civilization of any nation
by the, development of its highways,,"
he said. "I am not at all uncertain
that in the America- Just ahead the
development of highways will be as
important as the development of rail-
roads we have just witnessed."
Previous to the meeting in Hill aud-
itorium A. R. Kroh and Tom Snyder
spoke at a banquet at the Union. In
speaking of the back-to-the-farm
movement Mr. Kroh related how the
Babylonians flocked to the magnifi-
cent cities, how they became consum-
- ers instead of producers, and how as
result nothing remains of the country
ex" pt rocks and dust. He gave fig-
ures to show that the people in this
country are flocking to the cities and
are becoming consumers instead of
producers.

SECOND OPPORTUNITY WILL
GIVEN TO SIGN FOR
- YEAR-BOOK

BE

A campaign for the purpose of se-
curing subscriptions for 500 addi-
tional copies of the 1921 Michiganen-
sian will be launched Monday, Feb.
28, by the business department of that
publication. The drive will be of
three days' duration, and tables will
be placed at convenient parts of the
campus where students may sign sub-
scription blanks. Subscriptions will
also be accepted at the Michiganen-
sian office in the Press building.
According to the business depart-
ment, reports from the other confer-
ence schools indicate sales averaging
from 40 to 60 per cent of the entire
student population. Michigan, how-
ever, is far behind the others in this:
matter with a percentage approxi-
mating between 20 and 25 per cent of
the student body.
The 1921 year-book will have many
new features, including professional
art work, a larger athletic section, and
32 pages to be devoted to individual
snapshots of prominent students
whose names were selected by a Stu-
dent council committee.
Whitney Attends Educational Meet
Prof. A. S. Whitney, of the educa-
tional department, attended a meeting
of federal and interstate citizens' con-
ference on education at Lansing yes-
terday.

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LA

SOCIEDAD HISPANICA
LECTURE IS POSTPONED

"Women Writers of Spanish Amer-
ica," the lecture which was scheduled
to be given at 7 o'clock tonight un-
der the auspices of La Sociedad His-
panica, has been postponed until
further announcement
The next meeting of the society will
be held at 7:15 o'clock Thursday even-
ing March 3, in the Cercle Francais
room in University hall.

BURTON AND SHARPE RECEIVE
VISITORS, GUESTS, FRIENDS
"At home" day at the home of Pres-
ident Marion L. Burton and Mrs. Bur-
ton wasrattended byimore than 200
guests from the faculty and student
bodies. Ambassador William Graves
Sharpe and Mrs. Sharpe received with
President BurtoA and Mrs. Burton.
Among the out of town guests were:
Mrs. J. Playfair McMurrick, Toronto;
Mrs. Richard P. Strong, Cambridge;
Mrs. William A .Webster, Minneapolis;
Mrs. Fred B. Snyder, Minneapolis; and
Mr. A. M. Todd, of Kalamazoo, who is
the guest of President-emeritus H. B.
Hutchins and}frs. Hutchins.
Pool Fund Gets Donations of $700
Two donations to the Union swim-
ming pool fund totaling $700, were re-
ported yesterday by Homer Heath,
general-manager of the Union. The
donors were Charles R. Wells, '73, of
Bay City, and James Inglis, of Ann
Arbor, a directors' member. The gifts
were $500 and $200 respectively, and
were unsolicited.

Final Plans For Temporary Stands
On Ferry Field Are Completed

Final plans for the temporary stands
to be erected on Ferry field were ap-
proved by the Board in Control of
Athletics at a meeting Saturday night
in the Union. The new stands de-
signed by the stadium engineers will
have a seating capacity of 15,200. This
will provide a total of 37,600 seats,
which may be increased to 38,000 with
emergency boxes. It is estimated that
by the sale of standing room a crowd

ed to the western extremities of both
stands. These two structures will be
built only as far as the running track.
Between the two tracks a movable
stand will be built in two sections
which will complete the stadium. This
wooden "U" will be the same height
as the North stand.
The movable sections will be built
on rollers. The bottom tier of 15
rows will match the baseball stands

I

K. 0. T. C. NOTICE
19 Students
are required to complete the en-
rollment in the infantry unit of
the R. 0. T. C. Enroll now in
room 241, Engineering building.

of more than 40,000 can be efficiently and will be moved to the diamond
handled. when the football season is complet-
The specifications adopted provide ed. The upper tier will be rolled
for an extension of the east end of the back off the track and stored.
present North stand to balance it with A type of construction which corre-
the South stand which now extends sponds with the North stand will be
several yards beyond it. This addi- used. This stand has been recently
tion, which will be stationary, will be inspected by various engineering ex-
42 tiers of seats high as is the North perts and declared to be very well
stand, and will accommodate 1,100. built and still good for a long period
"U"-shaped extensions will be add- {of years.

. CHANGES OF ADDRESS
Any subscriber who has
changed his address this semes-
ter should notify the Daily office
so that his paper may 'be sent
to his new address. Either call
in person at the Daily office or
phone 960 in the afternoon.

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