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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 04, 1921 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1┬░ rir.L 1YiIt,.I1L

F A.

._

VER'SITY LIBRARY OWNS
VALUABLE COIN COLLECTION1
Approximately 10,000 copper, silver,
d gold coins, valued at $15,000, are
w owned by the library, according
Lib:arian W. W. Bishop. About
00 of the coins are copper and have'
en collected in America, Europe
d Africa.
The coins are the result of a num-
r of donations to the University, thel
ost important of which is a collec-
)f from Ptolemaic Egypt which is
nsidered the most complete assort-
ent of this period in the world.
A room will be provided in the pro-
sed museum for these coins, which
e essential to the study of history,
ie arts, and archaeology.
Cleveland Golfers Hocking Clubs
Cleveland, O., Feb. 3.-Cleveland
tectives making daily rounds of

pawnshops here declare the one thing
they never run across among the list
of articles "hocked" is the golf club.
Whether golfers as a class are be-
yond financial difficulties to the extent
of pawning their sticks or whether
their clubs are last,"to be hocked" inI
an emergency is unknown, but it
seems that golf clubs are among the
few things which may not be found in
pawnshops.
Local Clothiers Investigate Markets
C. W. Wagner and G. A. Hoffstetter
are spending a week in the East,!
studying the present market condi-
tions. Both men are connected with
Wagner & Co., local clothiers.

. I
H91NEWS SEA VIGEHEREI
Electrical Engineering Department
Willing to Co-operate With
Press
PACIFIC COAST SCHOOLS NOW

a

non stated that he felt that radio had
now reached the stage when it was
no longer merely a plaything. "When
the signal corps gets its set up, how-
ever.," he added, "they will probably
keep a regular watch as it has been
suggested we ought to do."
Motorcycle Industry Not Hard Hit
In contrast to the automobile situa-
tion there has been no shutting down
1 of the motorcycle industry. While not

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.

Ii.

The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $625,000.00
Resources .........$5,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron
707 North University Ave.

TVTT L E'S
LUNCH ROOM
A Nice Cozy Place Where
You Enjoy Your ~Feal
One half block South
of "MAJ"

I

ii

Use the advertising columns of The
Michigan Daily to reach the best of
Ann Arbor's buyers.-Adv.
Patronize Daily .advertisers.-Adv

t:. 4
{'

TAXI

999

x
I-

A Dodge Car
and Do dge
Service
enough said

999

TAX I

999

*,

ON CRANE'S
STATIONERY
The M
STAT
112 S. MAIN

' t1lI I 816I IIlII I[lll i 11i 1lli llilltlltl11I B 11111C11: i
LINEN LAWN & HIGHLAND LINEN
AND CORRESPONDENCE CARDS
ayer-Schairer Co.
IONERS, PRINTERS & BINDERS
STREET PHONE 1404
i91IliIlIUlI6lI11IlIlillillillillillillllllllillEIIIIIII110i19011tIllI1I

. I

AL

SENDING WIRELESS NEWS
In the old days before the war,
when amateur radio was in full swingt
Michigan's station over on the engi-
neering building was nationally
known and her old call, "8XA," was
nightly heard allthe way from Frisco
to the Atlantic and clear across the
gulf to the south. But of late the set
has been practically out of operation
and its call is now among the list of
the has-beens, wirelessly speaking.
When questioned recently, however,
regarding the possibility of re-install-
ing at Michigan something of a simi-
lar, though more practical, nature to
that in vogue before the war by the
installing of a radio news service for
the carrying on of dispatch work
along a near-commercial line between
the various schools in this part of the
country, Prof. Joseph H. Cannon, of
the electrical engineering department,
expressed his approval of the idea,
and stated that the station here would
be ready to co-operate.
Coast Schools Co-operate
The suggestion that such a service
mightube instituted came partially as
a result of the finding of a report in
the University of Washington Daily to
the effect that arrangements are now
under way among the colleges of the
coast to establish an exchange radio
news service in connection with the
Pacific Intercollegiate Press associa-
tion.
According to the story a message
has already been picked up from the
University of California by a Seattle
amateur reading, "We are ready to
communicate," and Stanford and Ore-
gon universities, as well as the Uni-
versity of Montana, are ready for the
work to begin. The Oregon Agricul-
tural college also expects to have its
set ready for operation by March 1.
The purpose of the service is to
make possible the handling of news
dispatches betwen the various colleges
and to enable them to send back and
forth the reports from various ath-
letic contests by wireless, instead of
having to use the telephone or wire
as at present. It was in the hope that
such an arrangement might be worked
out in this part of the country as well
fas in the West that the subject was
brought up.
Lack of Responsibility
"The only reason," Professor Can-
non said, "why we have not put this
station in operation on the same plan
as before the war is that we were
always troubled in the radio room by
the presence of a lot of youngsters
who had no business to be there. We
had to pay operators in order to have
someone responsible for the appa-
ratus, but they seemed to want to go
down there and use the set more as
a plaything than for any serious
work.
"We can't afford to pay out $600 a
year," he went on, "simply for the
pleasure of a few students, and so we
closed down the station from contin-
uous work. But," he added, "if any
of the students want to do any serious
experimental work that set will be
open for their use."
Professor Cannon also added that
if the publications wished at any time
to use the University apparatus for
the handling of any sort of news dis-
patches or for the receiving or trans-
mitting of the scores of athletic con-
tests he would have no objection to
the set being used.
Radio to Be Used More.
In fact a letter was recently re-
ceived from Purdue to the effect that
the score of the Purdue-Michigan bas-
ketball game last Monday night would
I be sent out by radio from Lafayette

as the game progressed and only the
fact that this communication was re-
ceived too late to permit the use of
the set for that purpose prevented the
station from taking advantage of it.
In regard to the complaint that the
station had not been used lately for
amateur communication, as it was
used before the war, Professor Can-

in a normal condition the industry is
active and running smoothly. Motor-
cyclists in general have not abandoned
their machines because of the open
winter. Dealers and manufacturers
expect a normal and prosperous sea-
son during the coming year.

I

DRESS WELL AND'
SAVE MONEY
Nobody likes to look "econom-
ical"-
BUT everybody likes to save
money
Do this by having your clothes
MADE TO YOUR MEASURE
You spend less because you buy
less often-
SUITS AND OVERCOATS
$35.00 AND UP
Albert Gansic, Tailor
113 South Main Street
Second Floor

Any way you look at it - whether from the
standpoint of purity, therefore safety; or from
the standpoint of food value, of genuine good-

v

Ilq

GOODHEW. FLORAL CO.
PHONE 1321 225 EAST LIBERTY

I

ness; you are justified in ordering

:n r'
ic~FRAlm

9s
They"'eiHre!
Tulips, Daffo ills, Freesia,
Narcissus and Hyacinths.
Plants and Flowers

I1

U 4

Mr. Steward:

SUITS and OVERCOATS

i

Are you satisfied with
your market service.
We would like to meat
you and figure your bill.
We steak our reputa-
tion on our ability to
please you.

.... .

- II 1111111t111I111111 H1111111111 11 i1T( 111111111111I~1111 111111 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111
- f
WY .. , , ~IRa
Qd E o :AVEiaa> CCF. OrTY-' 0"T4 STREET
Tele~phone ?Murr-ly Hill 88oo
Our representative will be at the
'HOTEL STATLER
Monday and Tuesday
February 14 and.15
with samples of Ready-made Clothing
Furnishings, Hats and Shoes
We have made Substantial Reductions
;. in Prices throughout our Stock of
Ready-made and Custom Clathing
S┬░TREMONTCOR. BOYLSTON20 BELLEVU AvxN-I
,l1[- 11i 111111i 1 1 1 1 1 11i fil1 1 ffyff/11s l 11[ 1 l 11111-iaJ1 1 1 1 1-1

331i3% Off

HATS, CAPS, GLOVES
AND ALL FURNISHINGS

THE

CENTURY MARKET

213 N. MAIN3

The Phone is 1091

20 Per Cent Off

2Price OVE RCOAT 1-2 ce

I

Wadhams &Co.
TwO COMPLETE STORES

SALE

STATE STREET

MAIN STREET

We will put on sale Friday and Saturday
only any overcoat in the store at just

HALF

PRICE

Student Christian Association

These overcoats are all High Grade.

No

EMPLOYMENT OFFICE

cheap, shoddy merchandise to offer, all
guaranteed to give you entire satisfaction.
When you buy a Fitform overcoat of
us you are getting the best money will buy.

Students desiring work please call
between the hours of

1.and 10 P.M.
week days only

9

Phone calls received from 9 a. m.

on except Sunday

Ready to Serve
AT ANY TIME
Open from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Pot of hot tea and bowl of ride
PLAIN CHOP SUEY
35 CENTS
CHINESE and AMERICAN Style
I Short Orders
Quang Tun, Lo
613 LIberty St J.

We are taking a big loss, so act quick,
Watch them go!

THE RATE FOR STUDENT WORK

is now 40o per hour

i

TOM

CORBETT

1I 116 EAST LIBERTY STREET II

I

I

L

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