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February 04, 1921 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-04

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,.

E WEATHER

r Lit

4Iaitj

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

PROBABLY SNOW; SOME
WARMER TODAY

VOL. XXX. No. 92. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTS

ATHLETIC ASS'N
RENDERS ANNUAL
FINANCIAL REPORT
DEFICIT OF $6,249.15 CAUSED BY
PAYMENT OF OLD
LOANS
TOTALS THREE TIMES
AS LARGE AS IN 1919
Football Only Sport-to Show Profit;
frack Team Loses
$8,000
Books and accounts of the Athletic
association for the last fiscal year,
July 1, 1919, to June 30, 1920, show
total receipts of $148,251.45 and dis-
bursements, including amounts paid
on past loans and to visiting teams of
$155,500.60, which accounts for the de-
ficit of $6,249.15, according to the re-
port of Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, chair-
man of the Board in Control of Athlet-
ics, recently presented to the Univer-
sity Senate. Totals were practically
three times as great as those of the
previous year and more than the
amounts of any previous year in the
history of the association.
Grid Makes $32,000
As in other years the only sport
which actually showed a profit was
football. Receipts were $73,766.76
and disbursements, including guaran-
tees to visiting teams, amounted to
$41,176.10. A net profit was thus de-
clared of $32,590.66.
Track was by far the most expen-
sive sport, $10,010.31 was paid out,
while only $1,806.81 was collected,
showing a loss of $8,203.50. Another
costly item was the up keep of Ferry
field, $15,782.90 was expended and ap-
proximately $1,000 taken in.
Baseball, which gave the second
highest returns, $5,193.29, lost nearly
as much as was received. The deficits
in other sports ranged as follows,
basketball, $4,790.66, and intramural
activities, which were almost a dead
loss, $6,239.66.
Profits of Present Year
The report also included a state-
ment of the profits of the present foot-
ball season. The total profits were
$70,086.93, only $3,680.83 less than the
total receipts of the previous season.
The largest return was made on the
Illinois game at which $19,746.74 was
taken in in net profits. Chicago fol-
lowed closely with a net gain of $17,-
888.21. The smallest amount, as is to
be supposed, was turned in at the Case
game, $732.25.
Games played away from home net-
ted large sums also. The profit from
the Ohio State game, which school has
not yet made their return, has been
estimated at $124500;00 and a like
amount was sent in from Minnesota.
One game only, the Tulane contest,
showed an actual loss of $1,093.90.
Flianees in Good Shape
As is indicated by this report the
finances of the association are in ex-
cellent shape. On June 30, 1920, the
association was indebted to the
amount of $10,729.28 made up of a
$3,000.00 note and an overdraft of
$7,729.28. Between this time and the
beginning of the college year, $10,000
was borrowed; making. a total indebt-

edness at that time to the bank of
$13,000, all of which was paid off by
Oct. 2. On Jan. 1, 1921, the associa-
tion had on deposit a free fund of ap-
proximately $40,000, made up of $30,-
000 in time certificates, and the bal-
ance in general account.
Making allowance for the expenses
for the balance of the present year it
would seem reasonable to anticipate
that the association should have on
hand a surplus of more than $15,000,
FRATERNITY STEWARDS
To fraternity and sorority
stewards:
Many Michigan athletes are in
need of work. It may be that
you will need men to work either
in your dining room or kitchen.
If so call Hammond, phone 188,
so that athletes may be given.
,these jobs.

PLAN SIX RECITALS
FOR EXAM PERIOD
Twilight recitals will be given in
Hill auditorium at 4:30 o'clock on six
days of the examination period. The
programs will be of a popular nature,
and numbers requested during the sec-
ond week will be played. Concerts
will not last longer than 45 minutes,
and no encores will be given.
Prof. Earl V. Moore will give the re-
citals on Tuesday and Thursday of the
first week and on Tuesday of the sec-
ond week, while Mr. H. R. Evans will
give the concerts on Monday and Fri-
day of the first week and Monday of
the second week.
The programs for the first Tuesday
and Thursday are as follows
Program for Tuesay, Feb. 8
Concert Overture in A ......Maitland
Slumber Song ................
Allegretto ....................Parker
Vesperal (Soir dans la plaine)..
.d'Evry
Romance sans paroles ........Bonnet'
Toccata ......... ........Boelman
Program for Thursday, Feb. 10
Allegro (from Symphony VI)..
.Widor
Serenade ...................Schubert
Pastorale, Op. 26...........Guilmant
Toccata and Fugue in D minor ..Bach
Reverie ....................Moore
Russian March............Schminke
PROPOSED BILL
AIDS UNIVESITY
Increase in Existing Mill Tax Would
Add More Than Million
to Revenue
PRESENT COST OF OPERATION
OF SCHOOL GIVEN AS CAUSE
Additional financial aid for the Uni-
versity is provided in a bill introduc-
ed Wednesday in the house of repre-
sentatives of the state legislature by
Peter B. Lennon, representative from
Genesee county. The bill recom-
mends an increase from three-eighths
to five-eighths of a mill in the tax
which supports the University. This
will mean an annual addition of
$1,130,000 to the revenue of the insti-
tution.
In presenting the bill, Representa-
tive Lennon pointed out that increas-
ed cost of operation of the University
has made the addition to the mill tax
absolutely necessary.
According to Shirley W. Smith, sec-
retary of the University, the bill was
presented after the decision of the
Board of Regents at their last meet-
ing that they could no longer put off
asking for an increase in the yearly.
income from the state.
Under present conditions the sum.
derived from the mill tax and from
student fees falls about $600,000 short
of meeting the annual running ex-
penses of the University. As yet
there has not been an actual cash
deficit as has been the case in many
other educational institutions which
have been striving to meet constantly
rising cost of operation with a fixed
income. The fact that there is. no
cash deficit is due to the existence of
a small surplus accumulated in other
years when expenses were not so
high. In addition to using up this
surplus, the Regents have been com-1
pelled to anticipate the income for
this year by drawing for pre'sent use

funds which ordinarily would be ex-
pende during the period from July to
December.
With the increase proposed by the
new bill the operating loss will be
overcome, and provision will be made
for the further expansion of the Uni-
versity.
SOPH ENGINEERS TO MEET
SATURDAY, AT 11 O'CLOCK
There will be a meeting of the soph-
omore engineers Saturday morning at
11 o'clock in room 348, Engineering
building. At this time plans for a
class party will be discussed and, also
a plan whereby reduced rates on slide
rules can be obtained. President J. E.
Johns is very anxious that every mem-
ber of the class be present.
Heaviest Frenchman Dies
Bourges, France, Feb. 3. - Pierre
Guindolet, reputed to be the heaviest
man in France, tipping the scales at
555 pounds, has just died here. He
was 28 years old.

NINE POLICEMEN
KILLED IN SINN
FEIN AMBUSH

J.O.Nurfin Announces One-man
Athletic Control At Mlichigan; No
Action As Yet 2y Regents On Plan

TWO ATTACKS START INCREASE
IN IRISH INSURGENT 1
OUTBREAKS
BRITISH NAVAL HERO
AMONG DAY'S VICTIMS
aurdered Inspector Had Saved Lives
of 600 American Soldiers
During War
(By Associated Press)
Dublin, Feb. 3. - Nine policemen
were killed and two wounded today
when two lorries ran into an ambus-
cade of Irish Insurgents between
Drumkeen and New Pallas, County
Limerick.
Another big attack occurred Wed-
nesday evening when 100 armed men1
attempted to rush the Rathcornac bar-
racks near Sermoy. The police, us-
ing rifles and bombs, beat off their
assailants. No casualties have beent
reported.
District Inspector Dead
District Inspector Francis W. Crav-
en was one of the victims of the am-1
buscade Wednesday at Ballinalee. In-
spector Craven served in the navy
during the war and received the Amer-
ican distinguished service and navy
crosses and the British distinguishedf
order. While commanding the British
destroyer Mounsey he saved 600f
American soldiers from the American
transport Otranto, when that vesselt
was lost as a result of a collision with
the steamer Kasamir off the Scottishi
coast in October, 1918.
Thirty minutes after the Otrantoi
jumped the rocks off Islay island thes
Mounsey, 'herself damaged by thei
heavySeas, came to the rescue.-
Craven Warnedt
Captain Davidson of the Otrantot
warned Lieutenant Craven not to at-c
tempt to reach the side of the trans-
port. Craven, however, carried out his
maneuver and succeeded in getting to
the side of the Otranto, from which he
took 600 American soldiers.I
Inspector Craven retired from the t
Navy with the rank of lieutenant-
commander and only joined the Royalt
Irish constabulary a few weeks ago.
CRANESPEAKS TODAY
ON LEAGUEOf NTIONS'
WILL LECTURE UNDER AUSPICESt
OF COSMOPOLITAN
CLUB;
Prof. Robert Crane, of the political
science department, will deliver an
address on "The League of Nations"
in room 206 University hall at 7:30'
o'clock this evening. The address
will be under the auspices of the Cos-
mopolitan club.
Professor Crane will explain the
machinery of the League of Nations,1
and give the function of each separate
part, as far as it is possible to do so.
He will make a comparison between
the league as at present constituted
and the probable league of the future.
The attitude of the United States to-
ward the league will be discussed, as
well as the substitute and alternative
plans for the league which have been
put forth by different factions. Pro-
fessor Crane will answer questions as
to what matters concern the league,
and what its value really is under
present conditions.
This lecture is the first of a series
to be given under the direction of the
Cosmopolitan club. Arrangements for
the series have been made by S. H.
Lui, '22. The next number will be
given by Prof. Wilbur R. Humphreys,

of the English department, on Feb.
25. His subject is "Proverbial Un-
wisdom."
Attendance at the lectures is not
limited to members of the Cosmopoli-
tan club, and any students interested
in the topics under discussion are in-
vited to attend.
Ann Arbor Men in New York
G. W. Wagner and G. A. Hoffstet-
ter, of the Wagner men's outfitting
company, are spending a week in the
East studying present market condi-
tions.

James. Murfin, nmember of the
Board of Regents, announced at the
University club luncheon in Detroit,
Thursday, that one-man athletic con-
trol would be established at the Uni-
versity of Michigan imemdiately, ac-
cording to an article in Thursday's
Detroit News. Mr. Murfin stated that
the plan was backed by President Mar-
ion L. Burton and by the Regents.
UNION STATES RESONS
FOR NOT ALLOWING BALL,
ARCHITECTS' DANCE BANNED TO
PREVENT EXPENSIVE '
PARTIES
That Union dances are intended for
the whole membership and not for
any particular group is the reason
given by Paul W. Eaton, '21, presi-'
dent of the Union, for the refusal of
the board of directors to grant the stu-I
dents of architecture permission to
use the Union assembly hall for their
ball. In a statement yesterday he ex-
plained the attitude of the board as
follows:
"Some criticism has arisen among
members of the Union over the recent
action of the board of directors in re-
fusing the architects permission to
use the assembly hall for their arch-
itects' ball. It therefore seems advis-
able to state publicly the attitude of
the board on such matters.
"The board strongly feels that it is
its duty to all Union members to .con-
duct the weekly dances as in the past,
for the benefit of the whole and not of
any particular group, making themI
democratic by keeping the price of a
ticket within reach of all. It there-
fore considers it against good policy
to relinquish any control over the sale
of dance tickets to any group or
school to be sold by the same within
itself or generally on the campus for
a sum higher than the regular price.
Two colleges beside the architects
have expressed a desire to take the
tickets for the dance in which their
college has the preference and sell
them for $5. This would result in
more expensive parties and the Union
would thereby expose itself to justifi-
able criticism, not only from such
members as are in the habit of criti-
cising, but from its many friends as
well.
"If it is the wish of any group or
college to plan for a dinner and later
attend the regular Union dances, then
the board feels that that is without
its jurisdiction and entirely up to the
individuals or .group so desiring."
DINNER PLANNED
BY '22 ENGINEERS
Junior engineers will hold their
formal dinner in the main dining
room of the Union on the night of
Feb. 25. Tickets for the event will
be placed on sale by members of the
social committee Saturday of this
week. Only 150 tickets will be sold.-
Following the dinner the engineers
will attend the regular Union dance.
They will be given preference of tick-
ets for the dance, and tickets will be
on sale to them from 5 o'clock Wed-
nesday, Feb. 23, until 1 o'clock Thurs-
day, Feb. 24. It is announced that
corsages will be banned.
M. A. C. BASKETBALL GAME
TICKETS DISTRIBUTED TODAY
Tickets for theM. A. C. basketball
game Saturday night will be distrib-

uted by Athletic association officials
from 9:30 to 12 o'clock and from 1:30
to 5 o'clock today in University hall.
The supply of pasteboards is limited
to 2,200 and because of the recent vic-
tories of the Varsity it is not expect-
ed that they will last long. Tickets
will be exchanged for athletic coupon
number 34.
Pi Delta Epsilon Holds Initiation
At a meeting of Pi Delta Epsilon,
national honorary journalistic frater-
nity, held in the Union last night, J.
E. McManis, '21, was initiated. The
remainder of the meeting was given
over to a discussion of problems re-
lating to campus publications.

It would place one man in direct
charge of all University athletic activ-
ities, both extramural and intramural,
and possibly in charge of the Univer-I
sity Health service. Mr. Murfin was
not certain upon the latter point, he
said.
The statement also said that the'
director would draw a high salary,
would hold professional rank and be
an ex-officio of the University Senate
committee on student affairs. Twenty-
five applicants have ben rejected thus
far, Mr. Murfin said.
When informed of the statement of
Regent Murfin, Prof. Ralph W. Aigler,
chairman of the Board in Control-of
Athletics, said he had not been inform-
ed of any definite action on the pro-
posed plan, and that such action
would have to come through the Board
of Regents.
Regent Junius E. Beal said that the
Regents have not yet taken action to-.'
ward the appointment of a director of
athletics, and that he was unable to
verify the statement made by Regent
Murfin before the meeting in Detroit.
MRS. PANKHURST
TALKS HERE.FEB. 18
"Wonsan Voter vs. Bolshevism" is Sub-
ject of Lecture by English
Leader
PERSONAL VISIT IN RUSSIA
MAKES HER AN AUTHORITY
Mrs. Emmeline Pankhurst, the noted+
English suffragette, will lecture in Ann
Arbor on "The Woman Voter vs. Bol-
shevism" on Friday evening, Feb. 18,
in Hill auditorium. According to her
public statement, Mrs. Pankhurst be-
lieves that the American woman will
eventually save this country from the'
terror of Bolshevism, the "shadows of
which are already creeping over our
land."
"Mrs. Pankhurst is a world figure,"
said Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood, of the

MIUSIC BY PROFI
STANLEY ON MAY
FESTIVAL PROS RAM
INVITATION COMES IN FORM OF
PETITION OF
CITY
COMPOSITIONS ARE OF
EXCEPTIONAL MERIT
School of Music Head Responsible in
Large Measure for Festival's
Success
Prof. Albert A. Stanley, director of
the University School of Music, has
accepted an invitation to give several
of his own compositions at the May
Festival this year.
The petition which he received came
from more than a hundred of the im-
portant men of Michigan who appre-
ciate the work that Professor Stan-
ley -has done here, and who think
that his own work should be given a
place in the program of this year's
May Festival. The petition was start-
ed by Prof. Hugo P. Thieme and was
signed by President Marion L. Bur-
ton, President-emeritus Harry B.
Hutchins, and many others.
Knows Best in Music
Professor Stanley has made Ann
Arbor known all over the country
through the May Festival. His knowl-
edge of the best that there is in mu-
sic has made Ann Arbor one of the
places in the country where an ap-
preciation of music is on the highest
plane.
The works of Dr. Stanley are writ-
ten with a thorough knowledge of mu-
sic and are distinctly learned in their
character. A few years ago when a
distinguished French pianist, Aroul
Pugno, came to this city and read one
of Professor Stanley's compositions,
he said, "That man knows music. He
is a learned man."
Professor Thieme, in speaking for
the signers of the communication,
said, "We think that it is no more
than right that in his last year some
of his own compositions should figure
in the programs of the May Festi-
val."

Oratorical association. "People who
know her say she is entirely different1
from the common caricature of the
suffragette. Rather, she is a refined,4
cultured English woman with a charm-
ing personality which endears her toj
all who meet her. This fact is sur-
prising to most people who know of
Mrs. Pankhurst only as a militant.
suffragette."t
In order that she might study Bol-
shevism at first hand, Mrs. Pankhurst
visited Russia following the war. She
spent six months in that country and
saw enough to make her realize the'
dangers of a Bolshevistic regime.
She met Russian leaders personally
and talked with them about the com-
munist idea.
She has been lecturing in the United
States and Canada for the past year
on the subject of Bolshevism and
comes to Ann Arbor with the informa-
tion she gained during her sojourn in
Russia.,
NAVAL RESERE UNIT
Lieutenant-Commander R. T. Brod-
head, senior Naval reserve officer of
Michigan, spoke before meetings of
officers and men of the Naval reserve
force last night at the Union, outlin-
ing plans for reorganization of the
unit, and answering questions relative
to discharges, confirmation of rating,
retainer pay, and summer cruises.
Commander Brodhead has been au-
thorized to organize the Naval re-
serves in this state into units for the
purpose of maintaining efficiency. The
plan of organization will be similar
to that of the Naval militia which has
now passed out of existence.
The difficulty in handling the large
amount of discharges and requests for
retainer pay was explained. Summer
cruises, which will start May 15 and
continue until October, will be offer-
ed to those on the reserve rolls, some
of these being only week-end cruis-
es, in order that the civilian life of
the men will be interfered with as
(Continued on Page Eight)

Professor Stanley is also reading
the proof on one of his most difficult
and one of his most learned works,
"Greek Modes." This is being pub-
lished by the University and will re-
flect honor on Professor Stanley and
on the University as well.
Petition from Town
The petition is a spontaneous re-
quest on the part of the people of
this city who know about- music and
who wish to do justice to him and his
work. "It is a tribute that does not
always come to men," said Professor
Thieme regarding the petition.
Professor Stanley, in reply to the
petition, made the following acknowl-
edgment:
A communication, signed by H. B.
Hutchins, M. L. Burton and many
other friends, recently received, con-
tains references to the services ren-
dered by me in the past on the value
of which I feel they place too high
(Continued on page Eight)
NILES AND CROSWELL HEAR
EXTENSION SERVICE LECTURES
Profs R. M. Wenley, of the philosophy
department, delivered a lecture on
"The Situation in British Domestic
Politics," last night at the high school
at Niles.
"Dollars and Sense in Education"
was the subject of the address given
by Prof. W. D. Henderson, of the ex-
tension division, last night at Cros
well.
Both lectures were given under the
auspices of the University Extension
service.
FEB. 6 LAST ISSUE
The Daily will suspend publi-
cation with the issue appearing
Feb. 6.
The first issue in the next se-
mester will appear Feb. 23.
All notices for events occur-
ing between these dates must be
in The Daily office by 5 o'clock
Saturday night.

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