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February 02, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-02

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,THER

SNOW;WARMER
[ TOADY

LASf r tigan

iI3 atij

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT ITIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXX. No. 90. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENT

SUES HENRY FORD
FO R $5ODDOOF
ACCUSES DEARBORN INDEPEND-
ENT, AUTO KING'S PAPER,
OF LIBEL
ATTACKS ON "MECCA,"
"APHRODITE," ALLEGED
American Stage Under Influence of
Scum of Nation, States
Article, Claim
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Feb. 1.-The praecipe in a
$5,000,000 damage suit against Henry
Ford and his paper, the Dearborn In-
dependent, was filed in circuit court
today by Morris Guest, play producer,
who alleged that an article in the In-
dependent on Jan. 22, 1921, contained
"libelous, slanderous, and false state-
aients" concerning Mr. Guest and cer-
tain stage productions he has han-
died.
flay Condemned
The article mentioned in the suit
was said to have attacked "Aphro-
dite" and "Mecca" in particular, term-
ing them the most "salacious, specta-
cles ever shown in America."
Guest's attorneys announced it had
had planned to file similar suits
n Detroit today. The article which
was alleged to have been libelous was
;loted in the praecipe. It asserted
tat the American stage was "under
tth influence of a group of ticket spec-
ultors, prize ring habitues, and Bow-
erv-characters." -
Debased Public, Claim
Aftr saying that "Mr. Guest stalks
befoe his fellow Jews as the most
sur e'sful lreducer if the year," the
arti le declares that Mr. Guest was
not V great producer, but a "great
panl'4er to a public whose taste he has
bfeer no mean factor in deba ,
-- -* aewspapesa
was a umnmbel'
ticket spec-
2' ne of the pub-

i

CITY TO NOMINATECMICHIGAN MEETS
OFFICERS IN MARCHLL AGGIES SATURDAY
nauri a nnr n une --_--- -

Nominations for city officers under
the present and the proposed charter
will be made at the primary elections
March 2, and the petitions for the
placing of names on the ballot must
be in the hands of the city clerk by
4 o'clock Feb. 9, according to an-
nouncement from the city clerk's of-
fice.
The city officers which are to be
elected by the city at large at the
coming election in April are to be,
under the present charter, a mayor
and a president of the common coun-
cil. Under the proposed charter, two
councilmen at large must be elected
who will take office if the charter,
which is to be voted on at the same
time, is approved. All of these men
will be nominated March 2.
TICKETS TO SOPHOMORE
PROM WILL COST 55AD
NUMBER TO BE SOLD LIMITED
TO 215, CAPACITY OF
UNION
A price of $5 has been set by the
Senate Committee on Student Affairs
for the tickets to the Sophomore
prom, and they will go on sale in
about two weeks. The number of
tickets to ba sold has been limited
-to 215, the capacity of the Union.
Every precaution will be taken to
insure that sophomores only obtain
tickets. The plan which has been
adopted by the Sophomore prom com-
mittee is to place the tickets on gen-
eral sale, as it will be absolutely im-
possible to handle the matter in any
other manner.
- On the day of the sale the treasur-
ers of each class will look up the pros-
pective buyers in their records before
a sale can be consummated. Every
ticket will be numbered, and the buy-
er will sign his name to a numeri-
cal list which will be used for rec-
ognition on the night of the Prom. It
is thought that by such procedure the
salo of tickets will be limited to soph-
C l1or" only.
('ArfT h BY hETECTIVES

SAVE LAHRE UMI

State Industries Can Cut Costs By
Consulting University's Research
Records, Says White
DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING
RESEARCH BEGINS SERVICE
"By co-operating with the Univer-
sity a considerable amount of the mil-
lions of dollars which are being spent
annually by private state industries
in independent research could be
saved," said Prof. A. E. White who is
in charge of the newly established
engineering research department. "All
state industries would find it .profit-
able to consult with the University's
existing records on the results of ex-
perimental problems," he continued.
First Step Taken
Yesterday the department of eng-
ineering research took its first active
step toward improving the situation
in the state by sending information
concerning this technical service to
more than two thousand industrial
plants. This service consists of plac-
ing at the disposal of the various con-
cerns all of the existing experimental
data on different phases of industrial
investigation. The technical library
service will cover the translation of
any foreign material relating to the
particular subject at hand, technical
digests, abstracts, bibliographies, and
photostatic reprints of industrial dis-
cussions from current periodicals.
Library Co-operation Desired
Co-operation with local libraries in
this matter is especially desired by
the department. However, as ordinary
libraries do not regularly carry this
kind of material, they will necessarily
communicate with thelibrarian of the
University of Michigan or with the
department of enginering research.
The desired information will then be
sent through the local libraries. The
papers may be kept for a period of
two weeks with time extension priv-
ileges.
Fire, Fire, Call
Of 4 ra ternies
"Fire, fire everywhere!" Boy, page
Samuel Taylor Coleridge and his lim-
itless water. In the last 24 hours four
fraternities have been visited by the
thing which makes the Russians rush
and which made the Indians like wa-
ter.
Clouds of smoke first made their
appearance at the Sigma Nu house at
11:30 o'clock Monday night, issuing
from some waste that had been ig-
nited by the furnace pipes between
the floor and the cellar. A damper
was. put on the threatening sparks
with a pail of water.
A few minutes later more hot stuff
which would have made Vesuvius
glow with envy poured out of the
Trigon house chimney. Wonderful
winter weather was all that saved the
roof as the moulten soot gushed over
the shingles until the fire chief ar-
rived half an hour later.
At 10 o'clock yesterday morning the
pest settled on the Phi Gamma Delta
house. Flames started from the chim-
ney and caught on the roof before put
under control by the fire department.
The last blaze victimized the Nu
Sigma Nu house early yesterday after-
noon. For a time the roof had the
temperature of an Arizona plain in
mid-summer, but the flames were soon!
extinguished without serious damage.
CLOPPET TO GIVE LECTURE
ON ANATOLE FRANCE TODAY
A lecture on Anatole France, the!
well known French author and dil-

ettante, will be given by Jean B. Clop-
pet, director of the Cercle Francais,.
at 4:15 o'clock today in room 203,
Tappan hall. The address, which is
under the auspices of the Cercle
Francais, will treat of Mr. France's
excursions into the various fields of
poetry, literary criticism, short story
writing, and socialism.
Young on Farm Bureau Committee
The forestry department of the
Michigan State Farm bureau has cre-!
ated a committee, of which Prof. L.
J. Young of the University's forestry
department is a member, to propose
to the state legislature improved for-
est fire laws.

Michigan's rejuvenated basketball
team meets M. A. C. in its next game
at 7:30 o'clock Saturday night in the
Waterman gymnasium. The Farmers
have shown to good advantage in
games thus far this season, and the
Varsity's victories over Purdue and
Chicago indicatethat the game should
be hard fought.
Tickets for the game will be dis-
tributed from 9:30 to 12 o'clock and
from 1:30 to 5 o'clock Friday morn-
ing and afternoon in University hall.
The supply of pasteboards is limited
to 2,200, which will be given out as
long as they lagst. Tickets will be
exchanged for athletic coupon num-
ber 34.
EATON TO REPRESENT
UNION T CONFERENCE
GOES AS DELEGATE TO 111. L T.
FOR MUSICAL
CLUBS

l
A

MICHIGAN SIXTH IN SIZE OF U. S.
UNIVERSITIES1 LITERARY COLLEGE
FIRST IN NUMBER OF MEN STUD'ENTEI

Paul Eaton, '21, president of
Union, was named yesterday to
resent Michigan misical clubs

the
rep-
and

Guest's career I 'Tes-t 1-'enry. icolored. charged with
'Cid v con. th ?urd(:c of his wife. Lulu Henry,
is }> t'e theatr's last Friday m;ornng, was taken into
J'cl' conriued .)A at< 2:0 o'clock yesterday aft-
_e : i1 in Detroit, by Harry Smith,
x;Y ENTS dei t sheriff of Washtenaw county,
r VAH ad .arren C.1 ichardson, a- colored
«0et ctive. The arrest was made at
-r Qr corner of Hastings and Clinton
sne s, and quite accidental, Henry
Regardimig Minor i)eta, 5 an his f r year old daughter hap-
Present Stains J'-W g to pass by the officers.
_e alleged murderer and the girl
Explaining the atet ord p r- wen brot it back to Ann Arbor at
taining to discharges, retajire pt' G 0 0c ck lst ,eniug. They Were last
confirmation of rating, summei cruis- e Friday morning. Soon aft-
es, victory medals, and organization d . Henry was found in her
of reserves Lieutenant-con-nIri.r rOO above a Washington street fruit
Broadhead, who is the senior naval e- with her head crushed by blows
serve officer of Michigan, wll speah at ro a bllnt istrument. She sue-
a meeting of the University studec i " d hlatn F:it' ght. The pre-
the naval reserve at 8 o'clo'k ompor ary hearmu- ~il b held before
row night. JIUic of th Pece Tunnn.
It is said that men on the iative
reserves do not generally keep in IAt,' GlEE CUB T° ? 1afE
touch with the questions ;it.on IA I:E ! _ 4CE ON 1EB. 22
mander Broadhead will discus. and:
it is with the purpose of making the i ee o the Girls' G ; .ub will
clear, besides acquainting the mee no'uee a from I to 5:30
with present conditions, tat w wfl & lt, n Vmingt-s bt Aday at
speak. : > ernice Ni're.s, '21,
He has been authorized _ organ u'es. . 'he club. L.s enpointed
naval reserves into units for the ir or; f i comittees to make fin-
pose of drill and maintaining -ci ; r eme-ts: Tickets. MaryChase,
ency. Part of his talk will dcx oted '24, Prs, Etty Payne, '21 music,
to explaining plans for the organ'. - bet avi' %- cheekig, JoyceVan
tion of such a unit in Ann Arbor. As.." pubi ily, Dorothy O'Con-
At 7 o'clock tomorrow evening t . l fandy, Ada N,-ten, '22.
meeting will be held at the LnL ;A lh- .- -e r the dance will be
which Commander Broadhead desires urnihFl: , Cor e Rogp.s' 2potlight
to meet all naval reserve officers wchestr and severai novelties have
This will be followed by _i c general : ea prL ed by the music commit-
meeting which all naval r,ves are Tes Tic s for ,he dance have been
requested to attend.i mted i may 'o secured at either
m e C 'un hook storcA :rad from
membr -he firNs' U'ee 'dbb.
EXAMINATION NOl" - AD
The Daily will print i11.an ERAT CLUB
Going On notices for tlh w -
of examinations and up }ri R I Wenley, of the phi-
24 in the Saturday and s i rTih y t;eun, will address the'
issues of the paper. Al ' '..ents Ira1 cl n at its meeting
must be turned in B-F - 1h= in 4 of the Union. Hisi
o'clock on Friday, Feb. -bjCt "s he Puzzle of Liberal-
ir_.'.All em hers of' the club are
riged to no thi- meetng

dramatics at the Intercollegiate Con-
ference on UndergraduateaGovern-
ment to be held April 15 and 16 at
Cambridge, Mass. The selection was
made by a committee appointed by the
Union board of directors: Donald J.
Porter, '21, C. Stewart Baxter, '21,
and Prof. John C. Parker, of the en-
gineering college. The board had
previously decided to send a delegate
and had voted that his expenses be
paid.
Four Delegates Wanted
LeGrand A. Gaines, 121E, president
of the Student council, who was elect-
ed last week, will represent the stu-
dent governing body. In accordance
with the four department plan of the
conference the University has been
asked to send delegates representing
student governing bodies, publica-
tions, musical clubs and dramatics,
and athletics.
The publications have not yet se-
lected a delegate but it is likely that
theBoard in Control of Student Pub-
lications will take favorable action
soon, according to Prof. E. R. Sun-
derland, secretary of the board. The
Athletic board, according to Prof.
Ralph Aigler, chairman, will discuss
the matter at its February meeting.
40 Universities Invited
For the discussion of common
problems, the committee, composed of
representatives of Princeton, Cor-
nell, Pennsylvania, Dartmouth and
Massachusetts Institute of Technolo-
gy, has invited 40 universities and col-
leges each to send four delegates to
the conference.
NOTED CHEMIST TO DISCUSS
CONSTITUTION OF METALS
Dr. Zay Jeffries, chief of research
for the Cleveland division of the
Aluminum company of America, will
speak on "Atoms and Metals" at 8
o'clock tomorrow night in room 165 of
the Chemistry building. Prof. A. E.
White of the chemical engineering de-
partment says that Dr. Jeffries is one
of the best informed men in the coun-
try on the constitution of metals.
"I know that, although his subject
is primarily chemical," continued Pro-
fessor White, "Dr. Jeffries will han-
dle it in such a way that all engineers
irrespective of what department they
are in will be interested in the lec-
ture. For this reason I hope there
will be a good attendance from all
fields of scientific activity."
Preceding the address there will be
an informal dinner at the UMion for
the speaker. Those who wish to at-
tend should communicate with either
Prof. W. P. Wood or Prof. C. Upthe-
grove.
FORMER PRODUCTIONS OF THE
CLASSICAL CLUE REVIEWED
An illustrated lecture on "Former
Productions Given by the Classical
Club" was delivered by Dr. Orma F.
Butler, of the latin department, at a
meeting of the Scroll held at 7:30
o'clock last night in room A, Memo-
rial hall. Following the lecture,
plans were discussed relative to an
informal dance to be given by the
club Feb..25, in Barbour gymnasium.
The name "Classical club" was re-
cently changed to Scroll, and a new
constitution was drawn up.

MRS. HARDING BEGINS
SHOPPING IN NEW YORK
New York, Feb. 1.-The wife
of the President-elect began sel-
ecting today the contents of her
White House clothes cabinet.
Mrs. Harding did not go shop-
ping but conducted a hotel suite
campaign for clothes. Fifth
avenue's modistes, tailleurs, and
furriers followed one another
into her room at the Ritz-Carl-
ton, where she spent nearly
eight hours inspecting their of-
ferings.
Mrs. Harding made it clear
that there will be no foreign
frills in -her wardrobe. "'Tm
100 per cent American," she
told a reporter.
Wilson To Call
Special Session
Washington, Feb. 1. - President
Wilson is expected to issue soon at
the request of President-elect Hard-
ng a call for a special session of the
new senate for March 4 to act on
Mr. Harding's nomination of cabinet
and other important officers. Such.a
special session is customary at thel
change of each administration and
usually lasts only a few days.
President-elect Harding will issue
after his inauguration a call for a
special session of the small congress
for early spring, but he desires to
have the more important of his offi-
cital appontments confi,'rmed before
that time so that his adminstration
machinery can be permanently estab-
lished with the least possible delay.

OVER THE WIRE

STATISTICS ARE COMPILED BY
RAYMOND WALTERS
OF LEHIGH
MEDICAL SCHOOL RANKS
FOURTH IN ENROLLMENT
Record Breaking Figures Due to Large
Registration of Freshmen and
Ex-Service Men
Enrollment of men undergraduates
in the literary college of the Univer-
sity is highest of all other universi-
ties in the United States, according to
an announcement made by Raymond
Walters, of Lehigh university, who
has compiled the figures. Michigan's
men, undergraduate literary enroll-
ment is placed at 3,039, with Harvard,
California, Columbia, and Princeton
next in line.
Libleral Arts Second
Enrollment in the liberal arts col-
lege here is second of all American
universities, being outnumbered only
by the University of California, which
places its total number of students at
5,671 to Michigan's 4,574.
Michigan is sixth in total university
enrollment, with Columbia first, Cali-
fornia second, Chicago third, Penn-
sylvania fourth, and New York fifth.
Its total enrollment is placed at 10,-
158, which is 203 more than in 1919
for full time regular students, and
987 more for total enrollment.
Michigan leads numerically in the
departments of science and engineer-
ing with 2,094. Of the five largest law
schools in the country this University
is fifth with a 347 enrollment.
Medical School Fourth
The Medical school ranks fourth
with 491 students, the dental college
the same, with a 440 enrollment. Mich-
igan has the fourth largest summer
school.
The record breaking enrollment
here, as in other American universi-
ties, is a result of large freshmen
classes and abnormal registration of
upperclassmen who have returned to
study after service in the war.
SOPH LITS MAKE RESOLUTION
CONCERNING PROM AT MEETING
Class Also Heartily Endorses Plans
Regarding Honor System;
Committees Named
Adopting a resolution relative to
the Sophomore Prom, heartily endors-
ing the honor system for the literary
college, and appointing two commit-
tees was the substance of the meet-
ing of the sophomore literary class
yesterday afternoon.
The resolution follows: "Be it re-
solved, That the sophomore literary
class, being fully cognizant of the in-
dividual and collective moral support
involved, hereby welcomes the re-
ponsibility of conducting the Sopho-
more Prom in such a manner that it
may retain the high standard which it
has enjoyed through the efforts of
the classes which have preceded this
class. That it pledges itself to do all
in its power to keep the.faith which
the committee on student affairs has
imposed on it."
Vernon Hillery, clas president, ap-
pointed Elmer Runt chairman, V. H.
Method, Edward Lambrecht, W. H.
Sweet, and Paul Kilbourn on the class
unity committee while R. E. Adams,
Jr., chairman, T. P. Banks, and G. W. -
Hyde compose the new athletic com-
mittee.
New Engineering Course Announced
A course in engineering mechanics,

embracing subject matter in engi-
neering mechanics 2 and part of en-
gineering mechanics 5, will be given
next semester under the catalogue
heading of Engineering Mechanics
2A.

Berlin, Feb. 1.-Dr. Walter Simons,
the foreign minister, declared in the
Reichstag today .that the government
would refuse to negotiate on the bas-
is of the Entente decision regarding
reparation and would formulate coun-
ter propositions. His position was
supported by all the party leaders ex-
cept the communists, who heckled and
Jeered him when he concluded speak-
ing.
Dr. Simons said the German gov-
ernment was unable either to refuse
or agree to participate in the forth-
coming London conferenca because it
had not yet been invited to send rep-
resentatives.
Washington, Feb. 1. - President
Wilson, accompanied by Mrs. Wil-
son, tonight went to the theater for
the first time since he was taken ill
more than a year and a half ago.
New York, Feb. 1.-A resolution di-
rected against Japan's occupation of
Vladivostok and Eastern Siberia was
adopted today at the conference in
Paris of all the elements opposed to
Bolshevism, according to a cable
message made public tonight by A. A.
J. Sack, director of the Russian in-
formation bureau in the United States,
and spokesman for the Russian dem-
ocratic anti-Bolsheviki forces.
The resolution, while not specify-
ing Japan by name, says "the confer-
ence must especially, most emphat-
ically insist upon a final cessation of
intervention in the Far East." The
text of the resolution notes "with
satisfaction the friendly policy of the
United States of America towards
Russia."

Club Meetings to Be Held as Usual
Girl Reserve work will be contin-
ued during examinations, according tof
the usual program, except in cases1
where a club meeting would interfere
with the examinations of the leaders,
in which case the meeting will be
postponed. A valentine party is be-
ing planned for all groups Feb. 11,

R. 0. T. C. NOTICE
42 Students
are required to complete the en-
rollment in the infantry unit of
the R. O. T. C. Enroll now in
room 241, Engineering building.

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