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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 01, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-01

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THEWEATHER
UNSETTLED; IROBAB

~r ie ifr i an

ttl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT 1IRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 89. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENT

CALIFORNIA

TRIP

FOR

TRACK

MEN

Y.~c 11C.A WILL
INTERESTFOREIGN
STUDENTS IN U.5.
CHARLES D. HURREY, '00, TO
CARRY ON WORK AMONG
AIM IS BENEFIT TO
INTERNATIONAL TRADE
Conditions in Various Universities
Over the World to Be Clostiy
Studied
To awaken the interest of foreign
students in universities of the United
States is the purpose of Charles D.
Hurrey, '00, general Y. M. C. A. sec-
retary of the committee on friendly
relations among foreign students. Ar-
riving in Ann Arbor Sunday, he has
endeavored to meet the students from
other countries enrolled in the Uni-I
versity of Michigan.
Michigan Declared Hospitable
"From what I have been able to
learn so far," he said, "Michigan has
been very hospitable to the so-called
foreign students and has endeavored
to make them feel a vital part of the
University. Much of the credit for
this should be given to the Michigan
Union, which is one of the greatest in-
stitutions of its kind in the country.
But much more can and should be
done to get the foreign students to
come here. That is exactly what I am
trying to make not only Michigan but
other universities see. If America
would only realize it, these students
are the future leaders of their na-
tions; they think and write and speak;
they influence public opinion. In the
long run they can promote or hinder
international trade according to the
impressions they receive of American
business men and methods."
This, as Mr. Hurrey expressed it, is
the "larger purpose" of the commit-
tee. It is for the carrying out of this
purpose that he is visiting the vari-
ous universities in. this country. He
is gaining the attitude of the foreign.
students in order that he may carry
their expressions back with him to
their countries. He plans to sail for
South' America Feb. 23, where he will
remain until spring, observfing the
activities in the various universities.
From there he is going to Portugal,
Spain, and Italy to observe student
life in the institutions of those coun-
tries. Mr. Hurrey will return to this
country in June to tell American uni-
versities what he has learned.
American Ideas Adopted
"I am much interested in making a
comparative study of University ac-j
tivities in both Latin America and
Latin Europe," he stated. "They havet
largely adopted the American idea of
activities and I wish to see what
progress they have made with their
publications, campus societies, and
fraternities. They have gained these
ideas from their countrymen who
have studied in our schools: Ideas
in politics have also been carried to
them and have had their influence.
"This is the reason that American
universities should put forth every ef-
fort to give foreign students correct

ideas in regard to civic life. In the:
long run these students are going to
be the biggest factors in increasing
our trade with foreign lands."
Literature Sent Abroad
Many universities have been taking
greater steps to bring students from
other countries to the United States.
Harvard has printed special bulletins
in Spanish for circulation in Latin
America. The University of Pennsyl-
vania and the Massachusetts Institute
of Technology have also done this.
Other schools have sent their circu-'
lars to foreign lands. "This," said Mr.:
Hurrey, "is a step in the right direc-
tion. But much more must be done.:
America must realize that her future
in foreign trade relations depends on'
how thoroughly she instructs foreign
students in our ideals and traditions."'

SING SING HEAD TO SPEAR
Warden Kirchwey Will Address Mem-
bers of Sociology Department
Speaking on a subject which will
deal with his work as warden of Sing
Sing penitentiary and of his experi-
ence in the field of research work in
prison management, George W. Kirch-
wey, of New York, will address mem-
bers of the sociology department at
9 o'clock Wednesday morning in
room 101 of the Economics building.
Mr. Kirchwey, who speaks tonight
in Detroit, was dean of the Columbia
law school for more than 10 years,
and served as warden Of the Ossining
institution for one year as successor
to Mott Osborne.. His talk here, while
arranged for students of social sci-
ence and criminology, is open to all
who desire to attend.
FORI6N RELIEF FUND
INCREASED BY 8200

MICHIGAN B[EATS Professors Discuss
Process For
5 Some interesting disclosures on the
practicabilityof Dr. A. A. Mickelson's
method of measuring stellar diameters
were revealed during the discussion
of his process which took place Mon-

Iickelson 's
r leasuring Stars

FINAL REPORT BRINGS TOTAL
, CONTRIBUTIONS CLOSE.'
TO $8,000

OF

Swelling the grand total to $7,180.85,
final reports have been turned in on
the Foreign Relief Fund drive which
was conducted on the campus from
Tuesday to Saturday of last week.
Additional contributions coming in
late Monday raised the total more
than $200.
"While we failed in obtaining Michi-
gan's full quota in this drive," said
Fred J. Petty, '21, chairman of the
fund committee, yesterday, "the cam-
pus should be commended on the ex-
cellent manner in which it has re-
sponded to the solicitors. The com-
mittee realizes that Michigan's allot-
ted amount was exceptionally high
and is gratified at the outcome of the
drive."
Proceeds from the campaign are to
be divided into three funds: The Chi-
nese Famine fund, the European Chil-
dren's fund and the European Stu-
dents' fund. Complete apportionment
of the money received has not been
nade, but of the full amount,,$3,495.85
is to go to the Chinese Relief fund.
Exams .Heralded
Vly New Gargol
Heralded by a cover in imitation of
the bluebooks whose appearance will
be so familiar to the campus within a
few days, the February number of the
Gargoyle made its appearance yes-
terday, with its aim declared to be
the dispelling of gloom caused by im-
pending exams, a postponed J-Hop,
and a student body immersed in a
state of coma. That the campus is
willing to forget its troubles is wit-
nessed by the sale of the issue, the
demand exceeding 2,500 copies.
Among the features is a collection'
of poems entitled, "The College
Child's Garden of Verses," which en-
deavors to present the well-known
Mother Goose rhymes from the stand-
point of the "collich man." A page
of cartoons by W. W. Gower, '23, of-
fers the Gargoyle's estimation of the
other campus publications.
STUDENTS MUST PAY RENT UP
TO FEB. 21, SAYS COMMITTEE
Unless students who are leaving
their present quarters re-rent their
rooms, they must pay rent 'up until
Feb. 21, according to the decision of
the committee on student conditions
which met yesterday afternoon at the
Union.
At this meeting the grievances of
more than 40 students and 10 land-
ladies were heard.
Engineering Lab Gets Studebaker
Through the efforts of Guy P.
Henry, '01E, chief engineer of the
Studebaker company, a Studebaker
automobile chassis, six-cylinder stock
model, has been given to the automo-
tive laboratory of the engineering col-
lege. The chassis, which arrived yes-
terday, will be used for experimental
purposes.

WONDERFUL DEFENSE HOLDS{
BOILERMAKERS TO FIVE
FIELD GOALS
WOLVERINE TEAM
AGAIN UPSETS DOPE;
Keeps Possession of Ball Practically
All of Time; Purdue Drops to ,
Second Place.
(Special to The Daily)
Lafayette, Ind., Jan. 31. - Michigan
tonight continued upsetting dope by
defeating Purdue, until tonight unde-
feated leader of Big Ten basketball,
by a score of 28 to 23, in one of the,
most bitterly contested court games
ever witnessed in Memorial gymna-
sium. Michigan's wonderful and in-
spired defense kept the Boilermaker
quintet to five field goalsethe re-
mainder of their points being made
on free throws by Captain White.
The Wolverine five kept possession
of the ball practically all the time,
and although the score was close at
all stages of the game, their clever
passing baffled the efforts of the Boil-1
ermaker court men to jump into the
lead. In their hard fight to defeat
the Conference leaders, Karpus and
Miller went out of the game on per-
sonal fouls, and their places were tak-
en by Whitlock and Weiss.
Rea hoops Two
Keeping up his spectacular shooting
which began Saturday night at Chi-
cago, Bud Rea, Wolverine guard, drop-4
ped in two long baskets. Duke Dunne
made three field goals, and Miller,1
Williams, and Weiss were responsible
for one basket each. Captain Karpus
counted two from the field and hoop-1
ed eight free throws.
Captain White was the Purdue
star. Counting on 13 fouls made pos-
sible by Michigan's hard playing,'
White by his excellent shooting kept
his team close to the Wolverines- at;
all times.
By virtue of its victory tonight;
Michigan has a percentage of .500
with a record of four victories and
four defeats. The playing of the
Wolverines in the last few games in-
dicates a powerful quintet, which got'
off in early season to a bad start.
Purdue Drops to Second
The Boilermakers, who by their
(Continued on Page Eight)
BUSINESS CONDITIONS
NOT IMPROED, REPORT,
JANUARY - REVIEW SHOWS NEW
ENGLAND BETTER; SOUTH
WORSE

-- - It was thought to be a necessary
SENIORS AND DEAN'S ADVISORY step in determining the diameter of
COMMITTEE TO DISCUSS double stars revolving in an orbit
AMRANGEMENTS perpendicular to the line of vision
from the earth.
Plans for the introduction of the

day afternoon in the Physics building.
Members of the physics and astrono-
my departments tools part in the dis-
cussion.
Dr. Sawyer Gives Interpretation
After an interpretation of the math-
ematical features of the process by
Dr. R. A. Sawyer, of the physics de-
partment, formerly with the physics
department of the University of Chi-
HONOR SYSTEM MAY BE
INTRODUCED IN FINL

honor system in the coming final ex-
aminations in the literary college were
discussed at the first meeting of the
senior honor committee held yester-
day at the Union. The committee aims
to inaugurate the system in the man-
ner outlined in the leaflet distribut-
ed to members of the literary faculty
a few weeks ago.
Petitions Circulated
It is the intention to give the sys-
tem a trial in classes of less than 50
in which seniors predominate with the
idea that it will be extended to the
other classes in the future. Petitions
are being printed which will be sent
to members of the faculty together
with information concerning the sys-
tem as proposed. Each instructor
will be requested to announce to such
of his classes as fulfill the above con-
ditions that he has a petition which
any member of the class who is in-.
terested may circulate.
The instructor is in no way obli-
gated to hold any examination under
the honor system unless he so de-
sires. If some students prefer a pro c-
tored examination the instructor may
give two examinations if he sees fit.,
No one will be compelled to take an
examination under the honor system.
Those who do take an honor examina-
tion will be asked to state on their
bluebooks that they have neither re-
ceived nor given aid during the ex-
amination."
Committee Meets Tomorrow
A sub-committee of the senior hon-
or committee will meet with Dean Ef-
finger's advisory committee Wednes-
day afternoon to discuss final ar-
rangements. Robert C. Angell was
elected chairman of the senior com-
mittee at its meeting yesterday.
DEBS' FREEDOM
AGAIN REFUSED

cago, the astronomical side of the pro-
position was given by Prof. W. J.
Hussey, of the astronomy department.
Professor Hussey showed how the
approximation resulting from the
mathematical computation made the
probable error equal to the diameter
of any body under consideration.
This means that the actual diameter
might be either twice that obtained
or one-half as great.
Only Applicable to Six Stars
Prof. R. H. Curtis, of the astronomy
department, then explained why Mick-
elson's method could only be applied
to six stars, giving for the reason the
fact that the diameters of practically
all stars would be less than the error
in figuring them out. Nevertheless
the method was upheld as a consider-
able advance in science.

FACULTY APPROVES1
Creation of Publications Committee
Also Advocated by Univer-
sity Senate
REGENTS' ACTION NECESSARY
BEFORE PLAN CAN BE USED
The advisability of having a Uni-
versity editor to have charge of the
editing of the official publications of
the University was determined by the
University Senate at their meeting
last night, when a series of resolu-
tions favoring a publications commit-
tee was passed. Action on the mat-
ter rests with the Regents, who will
meet Friday of this week.
Resolutions Passed
The resolutions which were passed
were drawn up by a committee of
which Dean E. H. Kraus acted as
chairman. '
They provide for a senate commit-
tee of nine to be known as the com-
mittee on publications and to be ap-
pointed by the President of the Uni-
versity. This committee will have
charge of the issuing of the official
publications of the University, that is,
University bulletins, announcements,
and such other publications as may
hereafter be assigned to the commit-
tee. This committee will have in-
structions to formulate rules and reg-
ulations with respect to the prepara-
tion of copy, which, as heretofore, is
to be prepared by the officers con-
cerned.'
Student Publications Not Included
The committee will further be given
the authority to devise a more eco-

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15 Members of Squad to Be Chosen
for Event; Coach and Manager
Will Go, Too
Michigan will. meet the University
of California in a dual track and field
meet at Berkeley, Calif., on Saturday,
April 9, according to an official an-
niouncement emanating- from the ot-
flice of P. G. Bartelme, director of out-
door athletics, yesterday afternoon.
Acceptance Wired Thursday
Negotiations were opened by the
Far Western institution several days
ago, when three Eastern universities
were reported to have received of-
fers for this meet. Michigan, Illi-
nois, and Wisconsin were the teams
desired by California and when after
a meeting of the Board in Control of
Athletics last Thursday night, accept-
ance was wired from the local office,,
the final arrangements were com-
pleted.
Coach Steve Farrell, Manager
Fischer, and 15 members of the Var-
sity squad, yet to be chosen, will
leave Ann Arbor Saturday night, April
1, on the first lap of the long jour-
ney. Because of the unusual length
of time which the trip will consume
it will be impossible to enter a Mich-
igan team at three big meetings which
were on the original schedule.
Ruling Prevents Eastern Meets
This is due to a ruling of the Uni-
versity authorities which states that
no athletic team representing the
University shall spend more than six
days away from recitations during a
single season. The Penn Relays at
Philadelphia, the Eastern Intercol-
legiates at Cambridge, Mass., and the
Drake Relays at Des Moines, Iowa, are '
the big events which will be dropped
from the 1921 schedule in order to
make the California trip.
Choice Is Unanimous
The entire proposition was placed
before the "M" men of the track squad
at a meeting several days ago and it
was the almost unanimous opinion of
the men that the Western trip should
be made at the expense of the others.
Fourteen events will be included in
the program for the meet, consisting
of the official events as prescribed
by the Western Intercollegiate con-
ference, including the javelin throw.
The University of Illinois fell before
the California track squad last year
in one of the most closely contested
meets of the outdoor season.
EATON ANNOUNCES
N E W COMMITTEE

WOLVERINE CINDER
SQUAD TO MEET
FAR WEST TEAM
BERKELEY TO BE SCENE OF DUAL
TRACK AND FIELD
MEET
ILLINOIS, WISCONSIN
OTHERS CONSIDERED

. (By Associated Press) nomical and effective method of dis-
Washington, Jan. 31. - Industrial tributing the publications than that in
operations have not increased suffi- Washington, Jan. 31.-Recommend- use at the present time. The work of
ciently to effect a material resump- ations by the department of justice this committee will not conflict with
tion in the widespread unemployment that the 10 year sentence of Eugene the work of the present Board in Con-
prevailing a month ago, according to V. Debs, long a prominent Socialist trol of Student Publications.
the review of business and financial leader, and now serving a 10 year A report of the committee on ath-
conditions of the country for Janu- sentence at Atlanta, Ga., for violation letic affairs was also read and ac-
ary issued tonight by the federal re- of the war time espionage law, be cepted at the meeting. This report
serve board. commuted, effective Feb. 12, Lin- covered the activities of the commit-
A slight increase in the activities coln's birthday, were rejected today tee and the financial condition, but is
of' leading New England industries by President Wilson and commutation not ready for publication at the pres-
during the month probably has refused. ent time.
brought a measure of relief there, the The decision of the President came
review said, but in the South and as no surprise because of his previous COMEDY CLUB TO
West the situation has become more refusal to intervene in the case on the
acute. ground that Debs had sought to hand- PRESENT PLAYLET
Wage reductions have continued, the icap the government through opposi-
report said, and the curtailment has tion to the selective service act during Comedy club members will hold an
led to sections of the country where the war, and that the granting of important meeting at 7:30 o'clock
wage rates have hitherto been main- clemency in this case might induce Tmpsday eeing at 7:30 clc
taine.d at high level. similar tactics on the part of others Tuesday evening in Sarah Caswell
Prices of certain staples, notably in the event of another war. An- Angell hall, according to notice given
grain, cotton and other agricultural nouncement of the President's ,decision out by Albert C. Jacobs, '21, president.
products rose early in January, the was made two hours after the recom- At that time a one-act play will be
board reported, but later in the month mendations of the department of jus- given by several members of the club
declined again. Other 'leading com- tice had been submitted to him. under the direction of Caroline Nap-
modities, however, such as crude and The case was reviewed by a special ier, '22. All members are urged to be
refined oils and bituminous coal, not board now taking up all convictions present, especially those recently
greatly affected in earlier months, under the espionage act and the find- taken into the society. Some import-
were increasingly weak, and iron and ings were endorsed by Attorney Gen- ant problems concerning the organ-
steel continued to decline. eral Palmer. ization will be taken up at this time.

Announcement of the appointment
of a Union library committee was
made yesterday by Paul Eaton, '21,
president of the Union. Sectional clubs
will be encouraged to have their home
papers sent to the building so that all
members can read them there. At
present only the largest metropolitan
dailies are taken by the Union.
The committee will also solicit
books for the library which is to be
in the second floor reading room as
soon as it is completed. Those ap-
pointed were: C. J. Riley, '22, chair-
man; H. E. Wilson, '23L, Mahlon J.
McGregor, '23L, Adrian T. Hess, '23,
Carl J. Miller, '22E, and Armand Mc-
Phee, '21.
R. o. T. C. NOTICE I
45 Students
are required to complete the en-
rollment in the infantry unit of
the R. O. T. C. Enroll now in
room 241, Engineering building.

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