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January 30, 1921 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY FEATURE SECTION
Published every Sunday as a supplement to
e regular news section of The Michigan
aily.
Contributions must be in the hands of the
litor by Wednesday previous to the date of
esired publication.
All communications or contributions mustE
e signed as an indication of good faith.

SLIM-What's a Lump Among]

be

I% so C JtO} F IT WASN'T 1 M SORRY MRS
FEEL.- " T341S PIPE SCANT } BUT IF
SICK MY 'rEET DON'T NAVE M
:21 CFIATTER HEAT W E.' LL.
TO MOVE
42 1
c ( .
- to o

SORE r-u, NACT ' NOT WSEV FrTH1OSE
NAVE t- STW EEK OYS t N OT HIN CT
~~tii

Sunday Editor.... Joseph A. Bernstein
Assistants
E.P. Lovejoy Thomas H. Adams
W. W. Ottaway Byron Darnton
John I. Dakin
Literary Editor............Stewart T. Beach
Theatres....................Edwin R. Miess
(By E. R. 1.)
The prize boner of the week was
pulled by the fellow ,who said that
Pauline Frederick was playing at the
Maj. in "Madame Ten."
Nearly everything has taken a drop,
but B. V. D.'s are still out of sight.
There was a young lady from Po-
,dunk,
Her uncle she met, he was sodrunk;
You're head-strong, she said,
At least strong in your head,
'Cause yor breath knocked me down
when you blodunk.
1. Do you know that a State street
jewelry store -has to change its name?
2. What one?
1. Hailer and Fooler.
COURTSHIP
In 3 Volumes
Book 1.
Contemplation.
Admiration.S
Flirtation.-l
Infatuation. S

. .

4
I 1

Book 2.
Inspiration.
Invitation.
Hesitation.
Perspiration.
Refutation.
Damnation.
Humiliation.
Book 3.
Demoralization.
Dissipation.
Realization.
Conciliation.
Restoration.
Visitation.
Acceptation.
Exultation.
Conjugation.
Finish:

r

rigorous, and becomes habitually
painstaking, and accurate, so that this
exactitude will hold for any set of
facts, under any conditions. To be
sure, there are fundamental abc's that
must be known, just as one must
know the multiplication table, but this
is subordinate.
Now take a glimpse into the college
itself, and judge whether it is narrow
gauge, or standard.
Is the practice of electing studies in
other colleges discouraged?
Last semester, enrollment blanks
for approximately 200 subjects not of-
fered in the engineering college were
necessary to take care of the demand
for cultural electives,'and the election
of these subjects was encouraged and
advised by members of the faculty!
Speaking of culture, there is an in-
novation in store for the "lit" who
blindfolded, might be beguiled into
the halls of the engineering building,
and unbandaged in the office of the
Dean. Culture? Art? Beauty? His-
tory? All of these and more will be
found embodied in the decorations. If
the Dean has a few moments, and the
student is interested, further revela-
tions await" him in the sort of prob-

lems that the bigger men of this col-

lege like-and are able-to think
about.
Admittedly Practical
The play hours of these men are not
concerned with the stress of bridge
girders, nor is their imagination con-
fined to the erection of power plants.
On the other hand, the engineer is,
admittedly practical. He has to be.
His standards are, to a great extent,
monetary. But his ambitions are not.
They include something bigger, and
vastly more important-doing a serv-
ice, and doing it well.
There is one other point in which
the engineers bear * most favorable
comparison with other professions.
Their .professors can practice what
they preach. A trite phrase but an
adequate one.
More and more are these men com-
ing into prominence, not as builders,
but as citizens. And I think it no error
in saying that the goal, for which the
faculty are aiming in the teaching of
the students, is a training, not only in
engineering, but in living. Living hon-
estly, adequately, and with a sense of
responsibility to others.

Friends? STUDENT CRITIC
THE ;uv " oMAKE
S YSE LANDALALES
GAME AR
SAMEPLAYE.1 HUNCH
ATSMEr(Continued from Page One)
* Paradise" one must wonder, if he
wonders about the book at all, just
o1what there is to it. -
For one thing, Fitzgerald is one of
- the first chroniclers of this era of
O alleged "jazz-madness' which may
have had its origin anywhere-in the
war, prohibition, fussing or in a dozen
different things, and, perhaps, the
book fills a niche as a more or less
authentic history of a type of life
which is surely prevalent in all of our
LME LUt' larger cities. Its story typifies the
unrest which seems to be a part of
the life of every undergraduate, as
f A lTrouble well as of prep school youths and
maidens, who at the. tender age when
Is . nded-AsTh one would suppose them to be safe at
SIt home by the fireside or in bed, are,
instead, cavorting about in this new
"night-life" of America, donning even-
(By Dr. Tom Lovell) ing clothes at twelve, and learning
1. all of the little follies which have
Let us go right back in history till late years, characterized only an
To see where the trouble come in, older generation.
For there stood ADAM and EVE Played Hunch
To show how the trouble begins. To repeart, the book is clever, and its
style gives promilse of better things to
3. come, a promise which, Fitzgerald has
When one starts out quite innocent, sadly belied in a later collection of
How they are tempted to get to know short-stories, "Flappers and Philoso-
And they'll never rest until they find phers," and in other short-stories
The knowledge in searching so. which have appeared from time to
3. time in current magazines. Fitzger-
All right then, about the J-Hop, ald is not a genius, nor is he a prodigy
Where the good and the bad comes in -he is simply a clever boy who had a
That's where the trouble lays "happy hunch" and played it, made
In the one that will commit sin. his mark immediately, and then, un-
less later wirks change his present
4. attitude, passed by forever any future
Loyalty and confidence in combination claim which he may have to recogni-
By putting one's foot down to say, tion from the world of letters.
I'll play the man and stand like a rock,
The J-Hop will only come back that Michigan Daily liners bring re-
way. sults.--Adv.

PurOFsSIO f STICK
SLIPPING is VENERABLEI
(Continued from Page One)

set of facts, we
earn a method
Simple isn't it?

learn them, and then
for their application..
But this training is

i

i

-- -_ i

I-

WEDNESDAY

- SATURDAY

DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS
IN
"The Mark of Zorro"

MUSICAL PROGRAMME
OVERTURE
ORPHEUS - - OFFENBACH
SELECTION
FROM G. PUCINNI'S "LA BOHEME"

I _

Ho B*

WARNER

and

HAROLD LLOYD

REMEMBER.

S

"One Hour Before Dawn"
H. B. WARNER
"When We Were Twenty-One"
The Screen 's Best-Dressed Star

II
N
DI

N1
D
A

6High and Dizzy"
Harold od
Number,Pieas
u9 Speckrl
t.
:v - '--
Clean, snappy, original comedy. Lloyd makes the voices with a
Lloyd gets a laugh and a kiss smile, ring with laughter.
where others get only a laugh. Connect your smiles with Lloyd.
t

T
U
E
S
DI
A
Y

A

I

Twenty-One Candles-
His sweetheart and guardian wait in vain, while the boy,
burning the candle at both ends, flings his youth in the
flame of folly and responds to the lure of an experienced
woman.
This boy must be savedx-but how?
It's a battle of youth against experience.

Y

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